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  1.  91 DLs
    Lyle Munro (1997). Framing Cruelty: The Construction of Duck Shooting as a Social Problem. Society and Animals 5 (2):137-154.
    Australia's Coalition Against Duck Shooting sees duck-shooting as a social problem and as an injustice with moral, legal and environmental consequences. The small animal liberationist group has succeeded in dramatically reducing the numbers of duck shooters in Victoria, which is the home of duck-shooting in Australia. The Coalition's framing work with the public via the electronic media involves three parts: a diagnosis , a prognosis and a motivational frame , all of which construct hunting as a cruel, antisocial blood sport (...)
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  2.  42 DLs
    Lyle Munro (1999). Contesting Moral Capital in Campaigns Against Animal Liberation. Society and Animals 7 (1):35-53.
    This article addresses a countermovement to the animal liberation movement and its campaigns against vivisection, factory farming, and recreational hunting in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia. As moderate welfarists, pragmatic animal liberationists , and radical abolitionists who advocate animal rights, animal protectionists campaign for animals. The countermovement defends acts that animal protectionists decry. Meanwhile, sociologists accord little study to interplay between the movements . In Buechler's and Cylke's collection of 34 papers on social movements , only one (...)
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  3.  12 DLs
    Lyle Munro (2002). The Animal Activism of Henry Spira (1927-1998). Society and Animals 10 (2):173-191.
    This paper profiles the animal activism of the late American animal activist Henry Spira, whose campaign strategies and tactics suggest a number of links with the nineteenth century pioneers of animal protection as well as with approaches favored by contemporary animal activists. However, the article argues that Spira's style of animal advocacy differed from conventional approaches in the mainstream animal movement in that he preferred to work with, rather than against, animal user industries. To this end, he pioneered the use (...)
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  4.  5 DLs
    Lyle Munro (2001). Future Animal: Environmental and Animal Welfare Perspectives on the Genetic Engineering of Animals. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):314-324.
    Genetic engineering is a social invention as much as a biological one. Ordinary citizens interested in the well-being of life on the planet should therefore be involved in the ethical debates concerning the future of nonhuman animals. The creations of genetic engineers ought to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by what the American philosopher R. G. Frey calls Frey is an advocate for putting animals in perspective, which means that animals matter, but not as much as humans. He therefore (...)
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  5.  2 DLs
    Lyle Munro (2001). Caring About Blood, Flesh, and Pain:Women's Standing in the Animal Protection Movement. Society and Animals 9 (1):43-61.
    Using the results of a survey of animal rights activists, advocates, and supporters, the paper reveals much more convergence than divergence of attitudes and actions by male and female animal protectionists. Analysis of the divergence suggests that the differences between men and women in the movement are contingent upon such things as early socialization, gendered work and leisure patterns, affinity with companion animals, ambivalence about science, and a history of opposition to nonhuman animal abuse by generations of female activists and (...)
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  6.  2 DLs
    Lyle Munro (2008). The Social Scientific Study of Nonhuman Animals: A Five-Volume Collection

    Animals and Society: Critical Concepts in the Social Sciences (Vols 1-5).
     [REVIEW]
    Society and Animals 16 (1):91-93.
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  7.  1 DLs
    Lyle Munro (1999). From Vilification to Accommodation: Making a Common Cause Movement. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (1):46-57.
    The history of the vivisection debate is a case study in the use of vilification not unlike its rhetorical use by adversaries in the pro-life/pro-choice controversy. According to Vanderford, vilification in that debate serves a number of functions: to identify adversaries as ; to cast opponents in an exclusively negative light; to attribute diabolical motives to one's adversaries; and to magnify the opposition's power as an enemy capable of doing great evil. In the vivisection debate, both sides have attempted to (...)
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