Search results for 'Lyn Cowan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  20
    Lyn Cowan (2002). Tracking the White Rabbit: A Subversive View of Modern Culture. Brunner-Routledge.
    Like Alice following the white rabbit into a topsy-turvy world where the laws of logic don't apply, subversive thinking unearths the mysteries behind the mundane. Tracking the White Rabbit is a fascinating, original work that invites us to use depth psychology to challenge our deepest assumptions about world politics, theology, social norms, everyday speech, and usual ideas of sex and emotion. Raised in an environment of McCarthyism and rock-and-roll, Jungian analyst Lyn Cowan shows readers-through provocative essays on memory and (...)
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  2. Steven B. Cowan (1996). A Reductio Ad Absurdum of Divine Temporality: STEVEN B. COWAN. Religious Studies 32 (3):371-378.
    Theists believe that God is eternal, but they differ as to just what God's eternality means . The traditional, historic view of most Christian philosophers is that eternality means that God is timeless. He is ‘outside’ of time and not subject to any kind of temporal change. Indeed, God is the creator of time. Lets call this view divine timelessness.
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  3.  5
    Michael Cowan (forthcoming). Advertising, Rhythm, and the Filmic Avant-Garde in Weimar : Guido Seeber and Julius Pinschewer's Kipho Film. Rhuthmos.
    Ce texte a déjà paru dans la revue October, N° 131, Winter 2010, p. 23–50. Nous remercions Michael Cowan de nous avoir autorisé à le reproduire ici. In September of 1925, readers leafing through Der Kinematograph or Lichtbildbühne or another such film journal might have encountered a strangely familiar sight : in an advertisement for a major exhibition of the German film and photography industries entitled “Kipho” (“Kino und Photo”), which was to be held in Berlin from September 25th (...)
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  4. Rosemary Cowan (2002). Cornel West: The Politics of Redemption. Polity.
    In this new book Rosemary Cowan provides a clear and highly accessible introduction to the work of Cornel West, a provocative and eclectic thinker who has emerged as one of America's foremost public intellectuals.
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  5. James Cowan (1990). D. H. Lawrence and the Trembling Balance. Penn State University Press.
    The "trembling balance" in Lawrence's work, considered either as theoretical system or in its phenomenological form, is characterized by the dynamic qualities of interrelatedness and flux. Cowan shows that, in Lawrence's conception, the dynamic experience of life's quickness necessarily involves giving up static equilibrium in the ebb and flow of human consciousness between self and other, bringing about a sequence of stability, instability, resilience, and creative change. Lawrence's conception of art as a recreation of the "trembling balance" of life (...)
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  6.  14
    John Cowan (2006). On Becoming an Innovative University Teacher: Reflection in Action. Society for Research Into Higher Education & Open University Press.
    "This is one of the most interesting texts I have read for many years ... It is authoritative and clearly written. It provides a rich set of examples of teaching, and a reflective discourse." Professor George Brown "...succeeds in inspiring the reader by making the process of reflective learning interesting and thought provoking ... has a narrative drive which makes it a book too good to put down." Dr Mary Thorpe "...a delightful and unusual reflective journey...the whole book is driven (...)
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  7. Nelson Cowan (2001). The Magical Number 4 in Short-Term Memory: A Reconsideration of Mental Storage Capacity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):87-114.
    Miller (1956) summarized evidence that people can remember about seven chunks in short-term memory (STM) tasks. However, that number was meant more as a rough estimate and a rhetorical device than as a real capacity limit. Others have since suggested that there is a more precise capacity limit, but that it is only three to five chunks. The present target article brings together a wide variety of data on capacity limits suggesting that the smaller capacity limit is real. Capacity limits (...)
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  8. Nelson Cowan, Candice C. Morey, Zhijian Chen & Michael Bunting (2007). What Do Estimates of Working Memory Capacity Tell Us. In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. OUP Oxford
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  9. Nelson Cowan (2012). Focused and Divided Attention to the Eyes and Ears : A Research Journey. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press 32.
  10.  39
    Robert Cowan (2015). Perceptual Intuitionism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):164-193.
    In the recent metaethical literature there has been significant interest in the prospects for what I am denoting ‘Perceptual Intuitionism’: the view that normal ethical agents can and do have non-inferential justification for first-order ethical beliefs by having ethical perceptual experiences, e.g., Cullison 2010, McBrayer 2010, Vayrynen 2008. If true, it promises to constitute an independent a posteriori intuitionist epistemology, providing an alternative to intuitionist accounts which posit a priori intuition and/or emotion as sources of non-inferentially justified ethical beliefs. As (...)
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  11. C. W. Churchman & T. A. Cowan (1945). A Challenge. Philosophy of Science 12 (3):219-220.
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  12. Robert Cowan (2015). Cognitive Penetrability and Ethical Perception. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):665-682.
    In recent years there has been renewed philosophical interest in the thesis that perceptual experience is cognitively penetrable, i.e., roughly, the view that the contents and/or character of a subject’s perceptual experience can be modified by what a subject believes and desires. As has been widely noted, it is plausible that cognitive penetration has implications for perception’s epistemic role. On the one hand, penetration could make agents insensitive to the world in a way which epistemically ‘downgrades’ their experience. On the (...)
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  13.  78
    Robert Cowan (2015). Clarifying Ethical Intuitionism. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):1097-1116.
    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in Ethical Intuitionism, whose core claim is that normal ethical agents can and do have non-inferentially justified first-order ethical beliefs. Although this is the standard formulation, there are two senses in which it is importantly incomplete. Firstly, ethical intuitionism claims that there are non-inferentially justified ethical beliefs, but there is a worrying lack of consensus in the ethical literature as to what non-inferentially justified belief is. Secondly, it (...)
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  14. Nelson Cowan (2001). Metatheory of Storage Capacity Limits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):154-176.
    Commentators expressed a wide variety of views on whether there is a basic capacity limit of 3 to 5 chunks and, among those who believe in it, about why it occurs. In this response, I conclude that the capacity limit is real and that the concept is strengthened by additional evidence offered by a number of commentators. I consider various arguments why the limit occurs and try to organize these arguments into a conceptual framework or “metatheory” of storage capacity limits (...)
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  15.  4
    Robert Cowan (forthcoming). Epistemic Perceptualism and Neo-Sentimentalist Objections. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    Epistemic Perceptualists claim that emotions are sources of immediate defeasible justification for evaluative propositions that can sometimes ground undefeated immediately justified evaluative beliefs. For example, fear can constitute the justificatory ground for a belief that some object or event is dangerous. Despite its attractiveness, the view is apparently vulnerable to several objections. In this paper, I provide a limited defence of Epistemic Perceptualism by responding to a family of objections which all take as a premise a popular and attractive view (...)
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  16.  2
    Chris Donlan, Richard Cowan, Elizabeth J. Newton & Delyth Lloyd (2007). The Role of Language in Mathematical Development: Evidence From Children with Specific Language Impairments. Cognition 103 (1):23-33.
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  17.  33
    Robert Cowan (2014). Moral Perception, by Robert Audi. Mind 123 (492):1167-1171.
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  18.  3
    George A. Cowan (forthcoming). Conference Opening Remarks. Complexity.
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  19.  3
    Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan & Glenda Andrews (2007). Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236-242.
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  20.  19
    Bainard Cowan (1983). Deconstruction and Criticism. Review of Metaphysics 36 (3):690-692.
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  21.  1
    Sharon Cowan (2004). ``That Woman Is a Woman!''The Case of V. And the Mysterious (Dis) Appearance of Sex: Bellinger Bellinger. Feminist Legal Studies 12 (1):79-92.
  22.  82
    Steven B. Cowan (2003). The Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge Revisited. Religious Studies 39 (1):93-102.
    The Molinist doctrine that God has middle knowledge requires that God knows the truth-values of counterfactuals of freedom, propositions about what free agents would do in hypothetical circumstances. A well-known objection to middle knowledge, the grounding objection, contends that counterfactuals of freedom have no truth-value because there is no fact to the matter as to what an agent with libertarian freedom would do in counterfactual circumstances. Molinists, however, have offered responses to the grounding objection that they believe are adequate for (...)
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  23.  69
    J. L. Cowan (1972). Inverse Discrimination. Analysis 33 (1):10 - 12.
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  24.  27
    Steven B. Cowan (2011). Compatibilism and the Sinlessness of the Redeemed in Heaven. Faith and Philosophy 28 (4):416-431.
    In a recent issue of Faith and Philosophy, Timothy Pawl and Kevin Timpe seek to respond to the so-called “Problem of Heavenly Freedom,” the problem ofexplaining how the redeemed in heaven can be free yet incapable of sinning. In the course of offering their solution, they argue that compatibilism is inadequateas a solution because it (1) undermines the free will defense against the logical problem of evil, and (2) exacerbates the problem of evil by making God the “author of sin.” (...)
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  25. Jane K. Cowan (2009). Culture and Rights After Culture and Rights. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  26.  22
    Sharon Cowan (2005). “Gender is No Substitute for Sex”: A Comparative Human Rights Analysis of the Legal Regulation of Sexual Identity. Feminist Legal Studies 13 (1):67-96.
  27.  1
    Patricia M. Greenfield, Heidi Lyn & Sue E. Savage-Rumbaugh (2008). Protolanguage in Ontogeny and Phylogeny Combining Deixis and Representation. Interaction Studies 9 (1):34-50.
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  28.  61
    J. L. Cowan (1965). The Paradox of Omnipotence. Analysis 25 (Suppl-3):102-108.
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  29.  8
    Paul Boyle, Sarah Gruber, Thomas Webler, Heidi Lyn, Jessica Sickler, Diana Reiss, John Fraser & Katherine Lemcke (2006). Social Narratives Surrounding Dolphins: Q Method Study. Society and Animals 14 (4):351-382.
    In preparation for development of an exhibit on the cognitive abilities of dolphins, the Wildlife Conservation Society sought to determine potential visitor's social perspectives about dolphin intelligence, and how these beliefs might influence acceptance of scientific information. The study reported here used Q methodology to identify these underlying social perspectives. The study of adults and the study of children each revealed three distinct perspectives. While consensus emerged among adults on points about dolphins' high intelligence and communication abilities, the three perspectives (...)
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  30.  41
    J. L. Cowan (1974). The Paradox of Omnipotence Revisited. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):435-445.
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  31.  18
    Denis Cowan (1984). A Note on Objective Identity and Diversity (PR III.1.7). Process Studies 14 (1):46-48.
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  32.  11
    J. L. Cowan (1968). Purpose and Teleology. The Monist 52 (3):317-328.
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  33.  16
    Jessica Sickler, John Fraser, Thomas Webler, Diana Reiss, Paul Boyle, Heidi Lyn, Katherine Lemcke & Sarah Gruber (2006). Social Narratives Surrounding Dolphins: Q Method Study. Society and Animals 14 (4):351.
    In preparation for development of an exhibit on the cognitive abilities of dolphins, the Wildlife Conservation Society sought to determine potential visitor's social perspectives about dolphin intelligence, and how these beliefs might influence acceptance of scientific information. The study reported here used Q methodology to identify these underlying social perspectives. The study of adults and the study of children each revealed three distinct perspectives. While consensus emerged among adults on points about dolphins' high intelligence and communication abilities, the three perspectives (...)
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  34.  6
    Bainard Cowan (1983). Reflection, Time, and the Novel. Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):134-136.
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  35.  5
    Noelle L. Wood & Nelson Cowan (1995). The Cocktail Party Phenomenon Revisited: Attention and Memory in the Classic Selective Listening Procedure of Cherry (1953). Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 124 (3):243.
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  36. Steven Cowan (2009). Molinism, Meticulous Providence, and Luck. Philosophia Christi 11 (1):156-169.
     
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  37. Steven Cowan (2009). On Target with “Molinism, Meticulous Providence, and Luck”: A Rejoinder to Scott A. Davison. Philosophia Christi 11 (1):175-182.
     
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  38.  2
    Peter R. Mueser, Nelson Cowan & Kim T. Mueser (1999). A Generalized Signal Detection Model to Predict Rational Variation in Base Rate Use. Cognition 69 (3):267-312.
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  39.  6
    C. W. Cowan & R. Tumulka (2014). Epistemology of Wave Function Collapse in Quantum Physics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axu038.
    Among several possibilities for what reality could be like in view of the empirical facts of quantum mechanics, one is provided by theories of spontaneous wave function collapse, the best known of which is the Ghirardi–Rimini–Weber theory. We show mathematically that in GRW theory there are limitations to knowledge, that is, inhabitants of a GRW universe cannot find out all the facts true of their universe. As a specific example, they cannot accurately measure the number of collapses that a given (...)
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  40. Steven Cowan (2008). “It Would Have Been Good For That Man If He Had Not Been Born”: Human Sinfulness And Hell As A Horrendous Evil. Philosophia Christi 10 (1):239-250.
     
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  41.  7
    Nelson Cowan & Michael A. Stadler (1996). Estimating Unconscious Processes: Implications of a General Class of Models. Journal of Experimental Psychology 125 (2):195-200.
  42.  41
    Joseph L. Cowan (1969). The Gambler's Fallacy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (2):238-251.
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  43. Nelson Cowan, Candice C. Morey & Chen & Zhijian (2007). The Legend of the Magical Number Seven. In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Tall Tales About the Mind and Brain: Separating Fact From Fiction. OUP Oxford
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  44.  10
    Joseph L. Cowan (1968). Pleasure and Pain: A Study in Philosophical Psychology. Macmillan.
  45.  5
    Maria Varelas, Christine C. Pappas, Justine M. Kane, Amy Arsenault, Jennifer Hankes & Begona Marnotes Cowan (2008). Urban Primary‐Grade Children Think and Talk Science: Curricular and Instructional Practices That Nurture Participation and Argumentation. Science Education 92 (1):65-95.
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  46. Terry Turner, Laura R. Graham, Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban & Jane K. Cowan (2009). Anthropology and Human Rights: Do Anthropologists Have an Ethical Obligation to Promote Human Rights. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell
     
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  47. Terry Turner, Laura R. Graham, Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban & Jane K. Cowan (2009). Rights: Do Anthropologists Have an Ethical Obligation to Promote Human Rights? An Open Exchange. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell 198.
     
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  48.  9
    Sharon Cowan (2012). To Buy or Not to Buy? Vulnerability and the Criminalisation of Commercial BDSM. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (3):263-279.
    This paper examines the interaction of law and policy-making on prostitution, with that of BDSM (bondage and discipline, sadism and masochism). Recent policy and legal shifts in the UK mark out prostitutes as vulnerable and in need of ‘rescue’. BDSM that amounts to actual bodily harm is unlawful in the UK, and calls to decriminalise it are often met with fears that participants will be left vulnerable to abuse. Where women sell BDSM sex, even more complex questions of choice, exploitation, (...)
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  49.  1
    Nelson Cowan, John N. Towse, Zoë Hamilton, J. Scott Saults, Emily M. Elliott, Jebby F. Lacey, Matthew V. Moreno & Graham J. Hitch (2003). Children's Working-Memory Processes: A Response-Timing Analysis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (1):113.
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  50. Nelson Cowan (1998). Attention and Memory. Oxford University Press Usa.
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