Search results for 'Lynda I. A. Birke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lynda I. A. Birke (1994). Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Open University Press.score: 2010.0
  2. Lynda I. A. Birke (2000). Feminism and the Biological Body. Rutgers University Press.score: 2010.0
  3. Marc Bekoffis, Bob Bermond, Lynda Birke, Bernice Bovenkerk, Baruch A. Brody & Jeffrey Burkhardt (2008). RSPCA. Jonathan Balcombe has Been Associate Director for Education in the Animal Research Issues Section of the Humane Society of the United States Since 1993. He has Degrees From York University and Carleton University, Toronto, and a Doctoral Degree in Ethology From the University of Tennessee. [REVIEW] In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 1080.0
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  4. Lynda Birke (2006). Meddling with Medusa: On Genetic Manipulation, Art and Animals. [REVIEW] AI and Society 20 (1):103-117.score: 960.0
    Turning animals into art through genetic manipulation poses many questions for how we think about our relationship with other species. Here, I explore three rather disparate sets of issues. First, I ask to what extent the production of such living “artforms” really is as transgressive as advocates claim. Whether or not it counts as radical in terms of art I cannot say: but it is not at all radical, I argue, in terms of how we think about our human place (...)
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  5. Lynda Birke (2002). New Section of S&A: Conceptual Animal Issues. Society and Animals 10 (1):3-4.score: 630.0
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  6. G. A. Birks (1956). Towards a Science of Social Relations (I). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 7 (26):117-128.score: 48.0
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  7. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2006). On the Repugnance of the Repugnant Conclusion. Theoria 72 (2):126-137.score: 15.0
    The aim of this paper is to discuss the plausibility of a certain position in the philosophical literature within which the Repugnant Conclusion is treated, not as repugnant, but as an acceptable implication of the total welfare principle. I will confine myself to focus primarily on Törbjörn Tännsjö’s presentation. First, I reconstruct Tännsjö’s view concerning the repugnance of the RC in two arguments. The first argument is criticized for (a) addressing the wrong comparison, (b) relying on the controversial claim that (...)
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  8. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2010). What is a Good Sports Parent? Nordic Journal for Applied Ethics - Etikk I Praksis 4 (1):215-232.score: 15.0
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  9. David Rhys Birks (2013). Wellbeing, Schizophrenia and Experience Machines. Bioethics 27 (2):81-88.score: 15.0
    In the USA and England and Wales, involuntary treatment for mental illness is subject to the constraint that it must be necessary for the health or safety of the patient, if he poses no danger to others. I will argue against this necessary condition of administering treatment and propose that the category of individuals eligible for involuntary treatment should be extended. I begin by focusing on the common disorder of schizophrenia and proceed to demonstrate that it can be a considerable (...)
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  10. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2010). Good Athlete - Bad Athlete? On the 'Role-Model Argument' for Banning Performance-Enhancing Drugs. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):332-340.score: 15.0
    The paper critically discusses a role-model argument (RMA) in favour of banning performance-enhancing drugs in sport. The argument concludes that athletes should be banned from using performance-enhancing drugs because if they are allowed to use such drugs they will encourage, or cause, youngsters who look up to them to use drugs in a way that would be harmful. In Section 2 the structure of the argument and some versions of it are presented. In Section 3 a critical discussion of RMA (...)
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  11. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2004). A Woman's Choice? On Women, Assisted Reproduction and Social Coercion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):81 - 90.score: 15.0
    This paper critically discusses an argument that is sometimes pressed into service in the ethical debate about the use of assisted reproduction. The argument runs roughly as follows: we should prevent women from using assisted reproduction techniques, because women who want to use the technology have been socially coerced into desiring children - and indeed have thereby been harmed by the patriarchal society in which they live. I call this the argument from coercion. Having clarified this argument, I conclude that (...)
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  12. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2004). A Woman's Choice? – On Women, Assisted Reproduction and Social Coercion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):81-90.score: 15.0
    This paper critically discusses an argument that is sometimes pressed into service in the ethical debate about the use of assisted reproduction. The argument runs roughly as follows: we should prevent women from using assisted reproduction techniques, because women who want to use the technology have been socially coerced into desiring children - and indeed have thereby been harmed by the patriarchal society in which they live. I call this the argument from coercion. Having clarified this argument, I conclude that (...)
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