22 found
Sort by:
  1. Lynn A. Jansen (forthcoming). Another Voice: Doctor Vs. Scientist? Hastings Center Report.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lynn A. Jansen (forthcoming). Local IRBs, Multicenter Trials, and the Ethics of Internal Amendments. Irb.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Lynn A. Jansen & Steven Wall (2013). Rethinking Exploitation: A Process-Centered Account. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (4):381-410.
    The term “exploitation” has gained wide currency in recent discussions of biomedical and research ethics. This is due in no small measure to the influence of Alan Wertheimer’s path-breaking work on the topic (Wertheimer 1999, 2011). Wertheimer presented a clear and compelling non-Marxist account of the concept of exploitation—one that stressed the connection between exploitation and unfair distributive outcomes. On this account, when one party exploits another, she takes advantage of the other to gain unfairly. A number of contemporary bioethicists (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Lynn A. Jansen, Paul S. Appelbaum, William Mp Klein, Neil D. Weinstein, William Cook, Jessica S. Fogel & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2011). Unrealistic Optimism in Early-Phase Oncology Trials. Irb 33 (1):1.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lynn A. Jansen (2009). Consensus and Independent Judgment in Clinical Ethics: Or What Can an Eighteenth-Century French Mathematician Teach Us About Ethics Consultation? Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (1):56.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lynn A. Jansen (2009). The Ethics of Altruism in Clinical Research. Hastings Center Report 39 (4):26-36.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lynn A. Jansen & Steven Wall (2009). Paternalism and Fairness in Clinical Research. Bioethics 23 (3):172-182.
    In this paper, we defend the ethics of clinical research against the charge of paternalism. We do so not by denying that the ethics of clinical research is paternalistic, but rather by defending the legitimacy of paternalism in this context. Our aim is not to defend any particular set of paternalistic restrictions, but rather to make a general case for the permissibility of paternalistic restrictions in this context. Specifically, we argue that there is no basic liberty-right to participate in clinical (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lynn A. Jansen (2008). Doctor Vs. Scientist? Hastings Center Report 38 (2):3-3.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Micah D. Hester, Dyrleif Bjarnadottir, Mark Bliton, Michael Boyland, Ken DeVille, Stuart Finder, Richard E. Grant, Chris Hackler, Lynn A. Jansen, Nancy Jecker, Kathy Kinlaw, Tracy Koogler, Eugene Kuc, Tim Murphy, David Ozar, Toby Schonfeld, Wayne Shelton & Alissa Swota (2007). Ethics by Committee: A Textbook on Consultation, Organization, and Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kathleen Cranley Glass, David B. Resnik, Stephen Olufemi Sodeke, Halley S. Faust, Rebecca Dresser, Nancy M. P. King, C. D. Herrera, David Orentlicher & Lynn A. Jansen (2006). Protection of Human Subjects and Scientific Progress: Can the Two Be Reconciled? Hastings Center Report 36 (1):4-9.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lynn A. Jansen (2006). Hastening Death and the Boundaries of the Self. Bioethics 20 (2):105–111.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Lynn A. Jansen (2005). A Closer Look at the Bad Deal Trial: Beyond Clinical Equipoise. Hastings Center Report 35 (5):29-36.
    : Some commentators have recently proposed that "clinical equipoise," although widely accepted, is not necessary for morally acceptable research on human subjects. If this concept is rejected, however, we may find that trials not in the best medical interests of their subjects--bad deal trials--could be justified. To avoid exploiting participants, we must find a way to distribute the risks fairly, even if it means embracing radical changes in the way clinical research is conducted.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Richard E. Champlin, Ka Wah Chan, Leonard M. Fleck, John Harris, Matti Häyry, Søren Holm, Kenneth V. Iserson, Lynn A. Jansen & Martin Korbling (2004). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian of the Pamela and Kenneth Fong Optometry and Health Sciences Library. This Library Serves the University of California, Berkeley–University of California, San Francisco Joint Medical Pro-Gram and the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:117-118.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Lynn A. Jansen (2004). No Safe Harbor: The Principle of Complicity and the Practice of Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):61 – 74.
    In recent years, a number of writers have proposed voluntary stopping of eating and drinking as an alternative to physician-assisted suicide. This paper calls attention to and discusses some of the ethical complications that surround the practice of voluntary stopping of eating and drinking. The paper argues that voluntary stopping of eating and drinking raises very difficult ethical questions. These questions center on the moral responsibility of clinicians who care for the terminally ill as well as the nature and limits (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Lynn A. Jansen (2004). Child Organ Donation, Family Autonomy, and Intimate Attachments. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (02):133-142.
  16. Lynn A. Jansen (2003). The Moral Irrelevance of Proximity to Death. Journal of Clinical Ethics 14 (1-2):49.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Lynn A. Jansen & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2003). Bioethics, Conflicts of Interest, the Limits of Transparency. Hastings Center Report 33 (4):40-43.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Lynn A. Jansen (2002). Evil, Forgiveness, and the Moral Community. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (1):21-25.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Lynn A. Jansen & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Proportionality, Terminal Suffering and the Restorative Goals of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):321-337.
    Recent years have witnessed a growing concern that terminally illpatients are needlessly suffering in the dying process. This has ledto demands that physicians become more attentive in the assessment ofsuffering and that they treat their patients as `whole persons.'' Forthe most part, these demands have not fallen on deaf ears. It is nowwidely accepted that the relief of suffering is one of the fundamentalgoals of medicine. Without question this is a positive development.However, while the importance of treating suffering has generally (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lynn A. Jansen (2000). The Virtues in Their Place: Virtue Ethics in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):261-276.
    We are currently in the midst of a revival of interest in thevirtues. A number of contemporary moral philosophers havedefended a virtue-based approach to ethics. But does thisrenewal of interest in the virtues have much to contributeto medical ethics and medical practice? This paper criticallydiscusses this question. It considers and rejects a number ofimportant arguments that purport to establish the significanceof the virtues for medical practice. Against these arguments,the paper seeks to show that while the virtues have a genuinerole to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lynn A. Jansen & Lainie Friedman Ross (2000). Patient Confidentiality and the Surrogate's Right to Know. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):137-143.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Lynn A. Jansen (1998). Assessing Clinical Pragmatism. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (1):23-36.
    : "Clinical pragmatism" is an important new method of moral problem solving in clinical practice. This method draws on the pragmatic philosophy of John Dewey and recommends an experimental approach to solving moral problems in clinical practice. Although the method may shed some light on how clinicians and their patients ought to interact when moral problems are at hand, it nonetheless is deficient in a number of respects. Clinical pragmatism fails to explain adequately how moral problems can be solved experimentally, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation