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  1.  12
    Vicki Xafis, Dominic Wilkinson, Lynn Gillam & Jane Sullivan, Balancing Obligations: Should Written Information About Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Neutral?
    Parents who are facing decisions about life-sustaining treatment for their seriously ill or dying child are supported by their child's doctors and nurses. They also frequently seek other information sources to help them deal with the medical and ethical questions that arise. This might include written or web-based information. As part of a project involving the development of such a resource to support parents facing difficult decisions, some ethical questions emerged. Should this information be presented in a strictly neutral fashion? (...)
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  2.  1
    Rosalind McDougall, Clare Delany, Merle Spriggs & Lynn Gillam (2014). Collaboration in Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Method for Achieving “Balanced Accountability”. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):47-48.
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  3.  22
    Clare Delany, Merle Spriggs, Craig L. Fry & Lynn Gillam (2010). The Unique Nature of Clinical Ethics in Allied Health Pediatrics: Implications for Ethics Education. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4):471-480.
    Ethics education is recognized as an integral component of health professionals’ education and has been occurring in various guises in the curricula of health professional training in many countries since at least the 1970s. However, there are a number of different aims and approaches adopted by individual educators, programs, and, importantly, different health professions that may be characterized according to strands or trends in ethics education.
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  4.  8
    Lynn Gillam, Clare Delany, Marilys Guillemin & Sally Warmington (2014). The Role of Emotions in Health Professional Ethics Teaching. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):331-335.
    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical framework to (...)
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  5.  5
    Lynn Gillam (1997). Arguing by Analogy in the Fetal Tissue Debate. Bioethics 11 (5):397-412.
    In the debate over fetal tissue use, an analogy is often drawn between removing organs from the body of a person who has been murdered to use for transplantation, and collecting tissue from an aborted fetus to use for the same purpose. The murder victim analogy is taken by its proponents to show that even if abortion is the moral equivalent of murder, there is still no good reason to refrain from using the fetal tissue, since as a society we (...)
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  6.  5
    Lynn Gillam & Priscilla Pyett (2003). A Commentary on the NH&MRC Draft Values and Ethics in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research. Monash Bioethics Review 22 (4):8-19.
  7. Arthur L. Caplan & Lynn Gillam (1996). When Medicine Went Mad: Bioethics and the Holocaust. Bioethics 10 (2):180-181.
     
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  8.  2
    Lynn Gillam (2000). The New National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans: A Commentary. Monash Bioethics Review 19 (1).
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  9.  12
    Lynn Gillam (2007). Response. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (2):153-153.
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  10.  27
    Marilys Guillemin, Rosalind Mcdougall & Lynn Gillam (2009). Developing “Ethical Mindfulness” in Continuing Professional Development in Healthcare: Use of a Personal Narrative Approach. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):197.
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  11.  4
    Lynn Gillam, Marilys Guillemin, Annie Bolitho & Doreen Rosenthal (2011). Human Research Ethics in Practice: Deliberative Strategies, Processes and Perceptions. Monash Bioethics Review 28 (1):07-1.
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  12.  1
    Lynn Gillam, Rosalind McDougall & Clare Delany (2015). Making Meaning From Experience: A Working Typology for Pediatrics Ethics Consultations. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (5):24-26.
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  13.  1
    Merle Spriggs & Lynn Gillam (2015). A Cautionary Note on Anonymous Referrals for Clinical Ethics Case Consultations. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (5):32-33.
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  14.  2
    Anita Silvers, David Wasserman, Mary B. Mahowald & Lynn Gillam (2000). Book Reviews-Disability, Difference, Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy. Bioethics 14 (3):276-278.
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  15.  5
    Lynn Gillam (1998). The 'More-Abortions' Objection to Fetal Tissue Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (4):411 – 427.
    One common objection to fetal tissue transplantation (FTT) is that, if it were to become a standard form of treatment, it would encourage or entrench the practice of abortion. This claim is at least factually plausible, although it cannot be definitively established. However, even if true, it does not constitute a compelling ethical argument against FTT. The harm allegedly brought about by FTT, when assessed by widely accepted non-consequentialist criteria, has limited moral significance. Even if FTT would cause more abortions (...)
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  16. Robin Levin Penslar & Lynn Gillam (1996). Research Ethics: Cases and Materials. Bioethics 10 (3):265-265.
     
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  17. Rosalind McDougall, Dominique Martin, Lynn Gillam, Nina Hallowell, Alison Brookes & Marilys Guillemin (2016). Therapeutic Appropriation: A New Concept in the Ethics of Clinical Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (12):805-808.
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  18. Merle Spriggs & Lynn Gillam (2016). Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Contraindication or Ethical Justification for Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery in Adolescents. Bioethics 30 (9):706-713.
    Is Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery for an adolescent with Body Dysmorphic Disorder ever ethically justified? Cosmetic genital surgery for adolescent girls is one of the most ethically controversial forms of cosmetic surgery and Body Dysmorphic Disorder is typically seen as a contraindication for cosmetic surgery. Two key ethical concerns are that Body Dysmorphic Disorder undermines whatever capacity for autonomy the adolescent has; and even if there is valid parental consent, the presence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder means that cosmetic surgery will (...)
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