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  1. Lynn Gillam, Clare Delany, Marilys Guillemin & Sally Warmington (forthcoming). The Role of Emotions in Health Professional Ethics Teaching. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101278.
    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical framework to (...)
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  2. Rosalind McDougall, Clare Delany, Merle Spriggs & Lynn Gillam (2014). Collaboration in Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Method for Achieving “Balanced Accountability”. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):47-48.
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  3. Lynn Gillam, Marilys Guillemin, Annie Bolitho & Doreen Rosenthal (2011). Human Research Ethics in Practice: Deliberative Strategies, Processes and Perceptions. Monash Bioethics Review 28 (1):07-1.
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  4. Clare Delany, Merle Spriggs, Craig L. Fry & Lynn Gillam (2010). The Unique Nature of Clinical Ethics in Allied Health Pediatrics: Implications for Ethics Education. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (04):471-480.
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  5. Marilys Guillemin, Rosalind Mcdougall & Lynn Gillam (2009). Developing “Ethical Mindfulness” in Continuing Professional Development in Healthcare: Use of a Personal Narrative Approach. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (02):197-.
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  6. Lynn Gillam (2007). Response. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (2):153-153.
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  7. Lynn Gillam & Priscilla Pyett (2003). A Commentary on the NH&MRC Draft Values and Ethics in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research. Monash Bioethics Review 22 (4):8-19.
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  8. Lynn Gillam (2000). The New National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans: A Commentary. Monash Bioethics Review 19 (1).
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  9. Anita Silvers, David Wasserman, Mary B. Mahowald & Lynn Gillam (2000). Book Reviews-Disability, Difference, Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy. Bioethics-Oxford 14 (3):276-278.
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  10. Lynn Gillam (1998). The 'More-Abortions' Objection to Fetal Tissue Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (4):411 – 427.
    One common objection to fetal tissue transplantation (FTT) is that, if it were to become a standard form of treatment, it would encourage or entrench the practice of abortion. This claim is at least factually plausible, although it cannot be definitively established. However, even if true, it does not constitute a compelling ethical argument against FTT. The harm allegedly brought about by FTT, when assessed by widely accepted non-consequentialist criteria, has limited moral significance. Even if FTT would cause more abortions (...)
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  11. Lynn Gillam (1997). Arguing by Analogy in the Fetal Tissue Debate. Bioethics 11 (5):397-412.
    In the debate over fetal tissue use, an analogy is often drawn between removing organs from the body of a person who has been murdered to use for transplantation, and collecting tissue from an aborted fetus to use for the same purpose. The murder victim analogy is taken by its proponents to show that even if abortion is the moral equivalent of murder, there is still no good reason to refrain from using the fetal tissue, since as a society we (...)
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  12. Arthur L. Caplan & Lynn Gillam (1996). When Medicine Went Mad: Bioethics and the Holocaust. Bioethics-Oxford 10 (2):180-181.
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  13. Robin Levin Penslar & Lynn Gillam (1996). Research Ethics: Cases and Materials. Bioethics-Oxford 10 (3):265-265.
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