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  1. M. A. Box (2008). Crito's “Impartial Observations on a Late Dramatick Work,” From the Caledonian Mercury, No. 5456 (Saturday 18 December 1756), [2–3]. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 34 (2):245-252.
    The following review by "Crito" was reproduced in shortened form in 1888 (Dibdin, Annals, 89-90) and is not now readily available. It is transcribed and edited here as illustrative of the events prompting David Hume's dedication to John Home of Four Dissertations in 1757. The possibility that Crito was in fact Hume deserves exploring, though the question remains speculative given the evidence available.The review appeared as a letter in the Caledonian Mercury and the Edinburgh Evening Courant, both on 18 December (...)
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  2. Donald Ainslie, Julia Annas, Margaret Atherton, Neera Badhwar, Donald Lm Baxter, Martin Bell, Lorraine Besser-Jones, Richard Bett, Simon Blackburn & M. A. Box (2005). Hume Studies Referees, 2004–2005. Hume Studies 31 (2):385-387.
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  3. M. A. Box (2004). Scepticism and Literature. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 30 (1):204-207.
  4. M. A. Box (2004). Scepticism and Literature: An Essay on Pope, Hume, Sterne, and Johnson (Review). Hume Studies 30 (1):204-207.
  5. M. A. Box (2004). Scepticism and Literature: An Essay on Pope, Hume, Sterne, and Johnson. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 30 (1):204-207.
  6. M. A. Box, David Harvey & Michael Silverthorne (2003). A Diplomatic Transcription of Hume's “Volunteer Pamphlet” for Archibald Stewart: Political Whigs, Religious Whigs, and Jacobites. Hume Studies 29 (2):223-266.
  7. Donald Ainslie, Kate Abramson, Karl Ameriks, Elizabeth Ashford, Martin Bell, Simon Blackburn, Martha Bolton, M. A. Box, Vere Chappell & Rachel Cohan (2001). Hume Studies Referees, 2000-2001. Hume Studies 27 (2):371-372.
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  8. M. A. Box (1996). The David Hume Library. Hume Studies 22 (2):383-385.
  9. M. A. Box (1995). Adam Potkay's The Fate of Eloquence in the Age of Hume. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 21 (2):333-339.
  10. M. A. Box (1990). Abbreviations. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press.
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  11. M. A. Box (1990). Contents. In Mathematical Logic Quarterly. Princeton University Press. 113-115.
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  12. M. A. Box (1990). CHAPTER I. The Climate of Opinion. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press. 1-52.
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  13. M. A. Box (1990). CHAPTER II. The Treatise. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press. 53-110.
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  14. M. A. Box (1990). Chapter III. The Essays, Moral and Political. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press. 111-162.
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  15. M. A. Box (1990). CHAPTER IV. The Enquiries. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press. 163-256.
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  16. M. A. Box (1990). Index. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press. 257-268.
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  17. M. A. Box (1990). Preface. In The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press.
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  18. M. A. Box (1990). The Suasive Art of David Hume. Princeton University Press.
    Recognized in his day as a man of letters equaling Rousseau and Voltaire in France and rivaling Samuel Johnson, David Hume passed from favor in the Victorian age--his work, it seemed, did not pursue Truth but rather indulged in popularization. Although Hume is once more considered as one of the greatest British philosophers, scholars now tend to focus on his thought rather than his writing. To round out our understanding of Hume, M. A. Box in this book charts the interrelated (...)
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