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    M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well placed (...)
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  2. M. A. Cook (2003). Forbidding Wrong in Islam: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Michael Cook's classic study, Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought (Cambridge, 2001), reflected upon the Islamic injunction to forbid wrongdoing. This book is a short, accessible survey of the same material. Using Islamic history to illustrate his argument, Cook unravels the complexities of the subject by demonstrating how the past informs the present. At the book's core is an important message about the values of Islamic traditions and their relevance in the modern world.
     
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  3. B. W. McGowan & M. A. Cook (1974). Population Pressure in Rural Anatolia, 1450-1600. Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (2):237.
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  4. George T. Scanlon & M. A. Cook (1972). Studies in the Economic History of the Middle East From the Rise of Islam to the Present Day. Journal of the American Oriental Society 92 (2):388.
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