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  1. M. B. E. Smith (2005). Commentary: How Much Should Lawyers Know When Picking a Jury? Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (2):2-54.
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  2. M. B. E. Smith (2000). Review Essay / Can a Lawyer Be Happy? Criminal Justice Ethics 19 (2):44-52.
    William H. Simon, The Practice of Justice: A Theory of Lawyers? Ethics Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998, viii + 253 pp.
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  3. Leslie Green, Kent Greenawalt, Nancy J. Hirschmann, George Klosko, Mark C. Murphy, John Rawls, Joseph Raz, Rolf Sartorius, A. John Simmons, M. B. E. Smith, Philip Soper, Jeremy Waldron, Richard A. Wasserstrom & Robert Paul Wolff (1998). The Duty to Obey the Law: Selected Philosophical Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  4. M. B. E. Smith (1997). Do Appellate Courts Regularly Cheat? Criminal Justice Ethics 16 (2):11-19.
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  5. M. B. E. Smith (1996). Review Essay / Rights and Responsibilities. Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (1):75-85.
    Lloyd Weinreb, Oedipus at Fenway Park: What Rights There Are and Why There Are Any Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1994, viii, 221 pp.
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  6. M. B. E. Smith (1992). Review Essay / the Best Intuitionistic Theory Yet! Thomson on Rights. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):85-97.
    Judith Jarvis Thomson, The Realm Of Rights Harvard University Press, 1990, viii, 383pp.
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  7. M. B. E. Smith (1991). Reply to David Luban. Law and Philosophy 10 (4):427 - 432.
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  8. M. B. E. Smith (1990). Should Lawyers Listen to Philosophers About Legal Ethics? Law and Philosophy 9 (1):67 - 93.
    In the recent spate of philosophers' writing on legal ethics, most contend that lawyers' professional role exposes them to great risk of moral wrongdoing; and some even conclude that the role's demands inevitably corrupt lawyers' characters. In assessing their arguments, I take up three questions: (1) whether philosophers' training and experience give them authority to scold lawyers; (2) whether anything substantive has emerged in the scolding that lawyers are morally bound to take to heart; and (3) whether lawyers ought to (...)
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  9. M. B. E. Smith (1989). Review Essay / the Obligation to Obey the Law: Revision or Explanation? Criminal Justice Ethics 8 (2):60-70.
    Kent Greenawalt, Conflicts of Law and Morality New York: Oxford University Press, 1987; xii, 383pp.
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  10. M. B. E. Smith (1980). Rights, Right Answers, and the Constructive Model of Morality. Social Theory and Practice 5 (3-4):409-426.
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  11. M. B. E. Smith (1979). Ethical Intuitionism and Naturalism: A Reconciliation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):609 - 629.
    I argue that, If one adopts a minimal naturalism (of a kind rejected by moore, Hare, "et al".), One would adopt a methodology which yields conclusions identical to that yielded by intuitionistic methodology (of a kind employed by ross, Prichard, "et al".). I dilate upon the advantages which thus accrue to each theory, And I defend my minimal naturalism against a variety of objections.
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  12. M. B. E. Smith (1974). Foot and Hare on Naturalism. Metaphilosophy 5 (3):187–197.
    In "moral arguments" ("mind", 1958), Philippa foot displayed what she claimed to be a deduction of an evaluative conclusion from a non-Evaluative premise. In "freedom and reason", R m hare attacks foot-Style deductions on two grounds: he first offers a "reductio", Comparing them to a racist deduction; he then offers an explanation of where all of these arguments go awry. I argue in my paper's first part that hare's explanation rests upon a defective criterion of entailment. In passing I show (...)
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  13. M. B. E. Smith (1973). Wolff's Argument for Anarchism. Journal of Value Inquiry 7 (4):290-295.
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  14. M. B. E. Smith (1972). Indifference And Moral Acceptance. American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (January):86-93.
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