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Mark Bernstein [32]Mark H. Bernstein [8]M. Bernstein [8]Michael André Bernstein [6]
Marica Bernstein [2]Marcia Bernstein [1]Mark Howard Bernstein [1]Moshe Bernstein [1]

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See also:
Profile: Mark Bernstein (Purdue University)
Profile: Michael Bernstein (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Profile: Morgan Bernstein (University of North Carolina, Greensboro)
Profile: Maia Bernstein (Columbia University)
Profile: Mia Bernstein
Profile: Maurice Bernstein (University of Southern California)
  1.  10
    Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur (2006). On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-6.
    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many (...)
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  2. Mark Bernstein (2004). Neo-Speciesism. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (3):380–390.
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  3. Mark Bernstein (1997). Contractualism and Animals. Philosophical Studies 86 (1):49-72.
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  4.  1
    Carly Ruderman, C. Shawn Tracy, Cécile M. Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Z. Shaul & Ross E. G. Upshur (2006). On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):5.
    BackgroundAs a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many were exposed (...)
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  5.  61
    Nir Lipsman, Rebecca Zener & Mark Bernstein (2009). Personal Identity, Enhancement and Neurosurgery: A Qualitative Study in Applied Neuroethics. Bioethics 23 (6):375-383.
    Recent developments in the field of neurosurgery, specifically those dealing with the modification of mood and affect as part of psychiatric disease, have led some researchers to discuss the ethical implications of surgery to alter personality and personal identity. As knowledge and technology advance, discussions of surgery to alter undesirable traits, or possibly the enhancement of normal traits, will play an increasingly larger role in the ethical literature. So far, identity and enhancement have yet to be explored (...)
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  6.  39
    Mark H. Bernstein (1998). On Moral Considerability: An Essay on Who Morally Matters. Oxford University Press.
    In this fresh and powerfully argued book, Mark Bernstein identifies the qualities that make an entity deserving of moral consideration. It is frequently assumed that only (normal) human beings count. Bernstein argues instead for "experientialism"--the view that having conscious experiences is necessary and sufficient for moral standing. He demonstrates that this position requires us to include many non-human animals in our moral realm, but not to the extent that many deep ecologists champion.
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  7. M. Almeida & M. Bernstein (2003). Lucky Libertarianism. Philosophical Studies 22 (2):93-119.
    Perhaps the greatest impediment to a viable libertarianism is the provision of a satisfactory explanation of how actions that are undetermined by an agent''s character can still be under the control of, or up to, the agent. The luck problem has been most assiduously examined by Robert Kane who supplies a detailed account of how this problem can be resolved. Although Kane''s theory is innovative, insightful, and more resourceful than most of his critics believe, it ultimately cannot account for the (...)
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  8.  77
    Mark H. Bernstein (2004). Without a Tear: Our Tragic Relationship with Animals. University of Illinois Press.
    The principle of gratuitous suffering -- The value of humans and the value of animals -- The holocaust of factory farming -- Hunting -- Animal experimentation -- The law and animals -- Women and animals.
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  9. M. Bernstein (2002). Fatalism. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press
     
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  10.  72
    Michael J. Almeida & Mark H. Bernstein (2000). Opportunistic Carnivorism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):205–211.
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  11. Mark H. Bernstein (2005). Can We Ever Be Really, Truly, Ultimately, Free? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):1-12.
  12.  17
    Mark Bernstein (2002). Marginal Cases and Moral Relevance. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (4):523–539.
  13.  2
    Kurt Hugenberg, Steven G. Young, Donald F. Sacco & Michael J. Bernstein (2011). Social Categorization Influences Face Perception and Face Memory. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford
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  14.  2
    Max R. Bernstein & Matthew V. Rockman (2015). The Expendables: Natural Selection Driving Reduced Gene Function. Bioessays 37 (11):1153-1153.
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  15.  72
    Mark H. Bernstein (1981). Moral Responsibility and Free Will. Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):1-10.
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  16.  19
    Mark Bernstein (1988). Justification and Determinism - An Exchange. The Monist 71 (3):358-364.
  17.  75
    Mark Bernstein (1989). Fatalism, Tense, and Changing the Past. Philosophical Studies 56 (2):175 - 186.
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  18.  16
    M. Bernstein (1995). Kanean Libertarianism. Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (1):151-57.
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  19.  17
    Mark Bernstein (1998). Explaining Evil. Religious Studies 34 (2):151-163.
  20.  66
    M. Bernstein (2001). Intrinsic Value. Philosophical Studies 102 (3):329 - 343.
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  21.  63
    Mark Bernstein (2007). Friends Without Favoritism. Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):59-76.
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  22. Marica Bernstein, Samantha Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). The Effect of Motivation on the Stream of Consciousness: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Cingulo-Frontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins 133-160.
  23.  39
    Mark Bernstein (1989). Fatalism and Time. Dialogue 28 (03):461-.
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  24.  48
    Mark H. Bernstein (1983). Socialization and Autonomy. Mind 92 (January):120-123.
    A problem closely related to the perennial free will question is whether autonomy of persons can be reconciled with socialization. If this latter compatibilism can be established, It would have great bearing on the more general issue of freedom being reconcilable with determinism. In several recent articles robert young has tried to demonstrate the consistency of autonomy with socialization, But the author argues that he has failed to notice the depth and global nature of the socialization critic's position, And as (...)
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  25.  32
    Elizabeth A. Armstrong & Mary Bernstein (2008). Culture, Power, and Institutions: A Multi-Institutional Politics Approach to Social Movements. Sociological Theory 26 (1):74 - 99.
    We argue that critiques of political process theory are beginning to coalesce into new approach to social movements--a "multi-institutional politics" approach. While the political process model assumes that domination is organized by and around one source of power, the alternative perspective views domination as organized around multiple sources of power, each of which is simultaneously material and symbolic. We examine the conceptions of social movements, politics, actors, goals, and strategies supported by each model, demonstrating that the view of society and (...)
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  26.  32
    Mark Bernstein (1986). Moral and Epistemic Saints. Metaphilosophy 17 (2-3):102-108.
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  27.  10
    Mark Bernstein (2010). Challenges and Defense. Philo 13 (1):94-111.
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  28. Maurice Bernstein, Christopher Meyers & Laurie Lyckholm (forthcoming). Case Study: A New Liver for a Prisoner. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  29.  30
    Mark Bernstein (1990). Fatalism Revisited. Metaphilosophy 21 (3):270-281.
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  30.  28
    Mark Bernstein (2001). L. W. Sumner, Welfare, Happiness and Ethics:Welfare, Happiness and Ethics. Ethics 111 (2):441-443.
  31.  8
    Mark H. Bernstein (2013). A Response to MacClellan. Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (1):69-71.
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  32.  30
    Michael Almeida & Mark Bernstein (2005). Is It Impossible to Relieve Suffering? Philosophia 32 (1-4):313-324.
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  33.  10
    Mark Bernstein (1985). Love, Particularity, and Selfhood. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):287-293.
  34.  14
    Mark Bernstein (1995). Robert Kane, Through the Moral Maze. Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (2):267-274.
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  35.  3
    Richard L. Allman, Mark Bernstein, Kerry Bowman Should, Kerry Bowman, Mark Bernstein Should & Munchausen Syndrome Proxy (2003). AGICH, GEORGE, J. Joining the Team: Ethics Consultation at the Cleveland Clinic. HEC Forum 15 (4):386-388.
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  36.  2
    Michael Alan Bernstein (1989). [Book Review] the Great Depression, Delayed Recovery and Economic Change in America, 1929-1939. [REVIEW] Science and Society 53:485-486.
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  37.  18
    Mark Bernstein & Kerry Bowman (2003). Should a Medecal/Surgical Specialist with Formal Training in Bioethics Provide Health Care Ethics Consultation in His/Her Own Area of Speciallity? HEC Forum 15 (3):274-286.
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  38.  10
    Mark Bernstein (1997). Robert Kane, the Significance of Free Will. Southwest Philosophy Review 13 (2):171-172.
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  39.  10
    Mark Bernstein (2006). Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):107-110.
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  40.  15
    J. Bickle, C. Worley & M. Bernstein (2000). Vector Subtraction Implemented Neurally: A Neurocomputational Model of Some Sequential Cognitive and Conscious Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):117-144.
    Although great progress in neuroanatomy and physiology has occurred lately, we still cannot go directly to those levels to discover the neural mechanisms of higher cognition and consciousness. But we can use neurocomputational methods based on these details to push this project forward. Here we describe vector subtraction as an operation that computes sequential paths through high-dimensional vector spaces. Vector-space interpretations of network activity patterns are a fruitful resource in recent computational neuroscience. Vector subtraction also appears to be implemented neurally (...)
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  41.  9
    Mark Bernstein (2006). Animal Pragmatism. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):107-110.
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  42.  9
    N. Lipsman, P. Giacobbe, M. Bernstein & A. M. Lozano (2012). Informed Consent for Clinical Trials of Deep Brain Stimulation in Psychiatric Disease: Challenges and Implications for Trial Design. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):107-111.
    Advances in neuromodulation and an improved understanding of the anatomy and circuitry of psychopathology have led to a resurgence of interest in surgery for psychiatric disease. Clinical trials exploring deep brain stimulation (DBS), a focally targeted, adjustable and reversible form of neurosurgery, are being developed to address the use of this technology in highly selected patient populations. Psychiatric patients deemed eligible for surgical intervention, such as DBS, typically meet stringent inclusion criteria, including demonstrated severity, chronicity and a failure of conventional (...)
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  43. Michael André Bernstein (1983). When the Carnival Turns Bitter: Preliminary Reflections Upon the Abject Hero. Critical Inquiry 10 (2):283-305.
    For Bakhtin the “gradual narrowing down” of the carnival’s regenerative power is directly linked to its separation from “folk culture” and its ensuing domestication as “part of the family’s private life.” Nonetheless, Bakhtin’s faith in the inherent indestructibility of “the carnival spirit” compels him to find it preserved, even if in an interiorized and psychological form, in the post-Renaissance literary tradition, and he specifically names Diderot, along with Molière, Voltaire, and Swift, as authors who kept alive the subversive possibilities of (...)
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  44.  9
    Mark Bernstein (2006). On the Dogma of Hierarchical Value. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):207 - 220.
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  45.  8
    Mark Bernstein (1998). Well-Being. American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):39 - 55.
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  46.  7
    Mark Bernstein (1991). Speciesism and Loyalty. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (1):43 - 59.
    It is undeniable that many human practices are detrimental to the well-being of non-human animals. Among other things, we trap and hunt them, experiment upon them, and kill them to use their flesh for food. We cause pain and suffering, and so a moral justification for these activities is required. Traditionally such a justification has taken the form of claiming that humans have some property–intelligence, ability to morally deliberate, etc.–which is both morally significant and missing in non-humans. However, once we (...)
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  47.  6
    Mark Bernstein, Wayne Owens & Michael Almeida (2006). Arthur Ron Miller, 1949-2006. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 80 (2):111 -.
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  48.  2
    Mark H. Bernstein (2011). ”Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship by Gary Steiner Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship Steiner Gary Columbia U Niversity Press„ New York, N Y 978-0-231-14234-2. [REVIEW] Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):96-98.
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  49. M. Bernstein & J. Bickle (2000). Fusing Significance Coding with the Stream of Cognitive and Conscious Sequences: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Motivated Saccadic Eye Movements. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S74 - S75.
     
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  50.  4
    Mark Bernstein (1994). Introduction. Philosophical Studies 75 (1-2):1-3.
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