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  1. M. D. Eddy (2010). Tools for Reordering: Commonplacing and the Space of Words in Linnaeus's Philosophia Botanica. Intellectual History Review 20 (2):227-252.
    While much has been written on the cultural and intellectual antecedents that gave rise to Carolus Linnaeus?s herbarium and his Systema Naturae, the tools that he used to transform his raw observations into nomenclatural terms and categories have been neglected. Focusing on the Philosophia Botanica, the popular classification handbook that he published in 1751, it can be shown that Linnaeus cleverly ordered and reordered the work by employing commonplacing techniques that had been part of print culture since the Renaissance. Indeed, (...)
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  2. M. D. Eddy (2008). 'An Adept in Medicine': The Reverend Dr William Laing, Nervous Complaints and the Commodification of Spa Water. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (1):1-13.
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  3. M. D. Eddy (2006). The Medium of Signs: Nominalism, Language and the Philosophy of Mind in the Early Thought of Dugald Stewart. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (3):373-393.
    In 1792 Dugald Stewart published Elements of the philosophy of the human mind. In its section on abstraction he declared himself to be a nominalist. Although a few scholars have made brief reference to this position, no sustained attention has been given to the central role that it played within Stewart’s early philosophy of mind. It is therefore the purpose of this essay to unpack Stewart’s nominalism and the intellectual context that fostered it. In the first three sections I aver (...)
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  4. M. D. Eddy (2004). Elements, Principles and the Narrative of Affinity. Foundations of Chemistry 6 (2):161-175.
    In the 18th century, the concept of ‘affinity’, ‘principle’ and ‘element’ dominated chemical discourse, both inside and outside the laboratory. Although much work has been done on these terms and the methodological commitments which guided their usage, most studies over the past two centuries have concentrated on their application as relevant to Lavoisier's oxygen theory and the new nomenclature. Kim's affinity challenges this historiographical trajectory by looking at several French chemists in the light of their private thoughts, public disputations and (...)
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  5. M. D. Eddy (2004). Peter Walmsley: Locke's Essay and the Rhetoric of Science. In Margaret A. Simons, Marybeth Timmermann & Mary Beth Mader (eds.), Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press. 25.
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  6. M. D. Eddy (2001). Geology, Minerology and Time in John Walker's University of Edinburgh Natural History Lectures (1779-1803). History of Science 39:95-119.
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