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  1. M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed. Philosophical Review 91 (1):3-40.
  2. M. F. Burnyeat (1976). Protagoras and Self-Refutation in Plato's Theaetetus. Philosophical Review 85 (2):172-195.
  3. J. L. Ackrill, Julia Annas, M. F. Burnyeat, John M. Cooper, Marcia L. Homiak, Rosalind Hursthouse, T. H. Irwin, L. A. Kosman, Richard Kraut, John McDowell, Alfred R. Mele & Martha C. Nussbaum (1998). Aristotle's Ethics: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The ethics of Aristotle , and virtue ethics in general, have enjoyed a resurgence of interest over the past few decades. Aristotelian themes, with such issues as the importance of friendship and emotions in a good life, the role of moral perception in wise choice, the nature of happiness and its constitution, moral education and habituation, are finding an important place in contemporary moral debates. Taken together, the essays in this volume provide a close analysis of central arguments in Aristotle's (...)
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  4.  27
    M. F. Burnyeat (2015). Enthymeme: Aristotle on the Logic of Persuasion. In Alexander Nehamas & David J. Furley (eds.), Aristotle's "Rhetoric": Philosophical Essays. Princeton University Press 3-56.
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  5. M. F. Burnyeat (1997). The Impiety of Socrates. Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):1-12.
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  6.  65
    M. F. Burnyeat (2002). "De Anima" II 5. Phronesis 47 (1):28 - 90.
    This is a close scrutiny of "De Anima II 5", led by two questions. First, what can be learned from so long and intricate a discussion about the neglected problem of how to read an Aristotelian chapter? Second, what can the chapter, properly read, teach us about some widely debated issues in Aristotle's theory of perception? I argue that it refutes two claims defended by Martha Nussbaum, Hilary Putnam, and Richard Sorabji: (i) that when Aristotle speaks of the perceiver becoming (...)
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  7.  79
    M. F. Burnyeat (2006). The Truth of Tripartition. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):1-23.
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  8. M. F. Burnyeat (1977). Examples in Epistemology: Socrates, Theaetetus and G. E. Moore. Philosophy 52 (202):381 - 398.
  9. M. F. Burnyeat & Bernard Williams (2006). The Truth of Tripartition. In Memoriam. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):1–22.
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  10.  86
    M. F. Burnyeat (1976). Protagoras and Self-Refutation in Later Greek Philosophy. Philosophical Review 85 (1):44-69.
  11.  64
    M. F. Burnyeat & Jonathan Barnes (1980). Socrates and the Jury: Paradoxes in Plato's Distinction Between Knowledge and True Belief. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 54 (1):173 - 206.
  12.  5
    M. F. Burnyeat (2005). Archytas and Optics. Science in Context 18 (1):35-53.
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  13.  53
    M. F. Burnyeat (1976). Plato on the Grammar of Perceiving. Classical Quarterly 26 (01):29-.
    The question contrasts two ways of expressing the role of the sense organ in perception. In one the expression referring to the sense organ is put into the dative case ; the other is a construction with the preposition δiá governing the genitive case of the word for the sense organ.
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  14. Rachana Kamtekar, Mark McPherran, P. T. Geach, S. Marc Cohen, Gregory Vlastos, E. De Strycker, S. R. Slings, Donald Morrison, Terence Irwin, M. F. Burnyeat, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Richard Kraut, David Bostock & Verity Harte (2004). Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Plato's Euthyrphro, Apology, andCrito portray Socrates' words and deeds during his trial for disbelieving in the Gods of Athens and corrupting the Athenian youth, and constitute a defense of the man Socrates and of his way of life, the philosophic life. The twelve essays in the volume, written by leading classical philosophers, investigate various aspects of these works of Plato, including the significance of Plato's characters, Socrates's revolutionary religious ideas, and the relationship between historical events and Plato's texts.
     
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  15. M. F. Burnyeat (2009). Eikōs muthos. In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press 167--186.
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  16. M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed*: M. F. Burnyeat. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:19-50.
    It is a standing temptation for philosophers to find anticipations of their own views in the great thinkers of the past, but few have been so bold in the search for precursors, and so utterly mistaken, as Berkeley when he claimed Plato and Aristotle as allies to his immaterialist idealism. In Siris: A Chain of Philosophical Reflexions and Inquiries Concerning the Virtues of Tar-Water , which Berkeley published in his old age in 1744, he reviews the leading philosophies of antiquity (...)
     
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  17. M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Gods and Heaps. In M. Schofield & M. C. Nussbaum (eds.), Language and Logos. Cambridge University Press
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  18.  8
    M. F. Burnyeat (2006). The Presidential Address: The Truth of Tripartition. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106:1 - 23.
    Since the arguments that Plato provides in the Republic for the thesis that the human soul consist of three parts (reason, spirit, appetite) are notoriously problematic, I propose other reasons for accepting tripartition: reasons that we too could endorse, or at least entertain with some sympathy. To wit, (a) the appetitive part of Plato's divided soul houses desires and tendencies we have because we are animal bodies programmed to survive (as individuals and as a species) in disequilibrium with a variegated, (...)
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  19.  41
    M. F. Burnyeat (2002). "De Anima" II 5. Phronesis 47 (1):28 - 90.
    This is a close scrutiny of "De Anima II 5", led by two questions. First, what can be learned from so long and intricate a discussion about the neglected problem of how to read an Aristotelian chapter? Second, what can the chapter, properly read, teach us about some widely debated issues in Aristotle's theory of perception? I argue that it refutes two claims defended by Martha Nussbaum, Hilary Putnam, and Richard Sorabji: (i) that when Aristotle speaks of the perceiver becoming (...)
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  20.  33
    M. F. Burnyeat (1987). The Inaugural Address: Wittgenstein and Augustine De Magistro. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 61:1 - 24.
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  21.  35
    M. F. Burnyeat (2001). What Was the 'Common Arrangement'? An Inquiry Into John Stuart Mill's Boyhood Reading of Plato. Utilitas 13 (1):1.
    This article is detective work, not philosophy. J. S. Mill's Autobiography records that at the age of seven he read, in Greek,. Which were the other dialogues? On the arrangement common today, it would be Crito, Apology, Phaedo, Cratylus. On the arrangement common then, Theages and Erastai replace Cratylus, which makes seven dialogues. I show that this must be the answer by the evidence of James Mill's commonplace books and his writings on Plato. These reveal which collected edition of Plato (...)
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  22. M. F. Burnyeat (2005). 'Apology'30b 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of Gignesthai (Plato)(Vol 123, Pg 1, 2003). Journal of Hellenic Studies 125:139-142.
     
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  23. M. F. Burnyeat (2008). Eikos Muthos. In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press
     
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  24.  1
    M. F. Burnyeat & Bernard Williams (2006). The Truth of Tripartition. In Memoriam. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):1-22.
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  25.  1
    M. F. Burnyeat (1968). XII—Belief in Speech. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 68 (1):227-248.
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  26. M. F. Burnyeat, Daniel W. Graham, G. E. R. Lloyd, Jonathan Lear, Theodore Scaltsas & Charles H. Kahn (1992). Brill Online Books and Journals. Phronesis 37 (2).
     
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  27.  13
    M. F. Burnyeat (forthcoming). Apology 30B 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of ΓΙΓΝΕΣΘΑΙ. Journal of Hellenic Studies.
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  28.  33
    M. F. Burnyeat (1981). Ronna Burger: Plato's Phaedrus: A Defense of a Philosophic Art of Writing. Pp. 160. Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 1980. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 31 (02):299-300.
  29.  38
    M. F. Burnyeat (1976). Erratum: "Protagoras and Self-Refutation in Later Greek Philosophy". Philosophical Review 85 (3):436 -.
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  30.  3
    M. F. Burnyeat (2003). Apology 30B 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of ΓΙΓΝΕΣΘΑΙApology 30B 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of GIGNESQAI. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:1.
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  31.  23
    M. F. Burnyeat (2004). Aristotelian Revisions: The Case of "de Sensu". Apeiron 37 (2):177 - 180.
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  32.  8
    M. F. Burnyeat (1967). Belief in Speech. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 68:227 - 248.
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  33.  25
    M. F. Burnyeat (1997). Postscript on Silent Reading. Classical Quarterly 47 (01):74-.
  34.  23
    M. F. Burnyeat (1970). The Material and Sources of Plato's Dream. Phronesis 15 (1):101-122.
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  35.  2
    M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 13:19-50.
  36.  2
    M. F. Burnyeat (2001). What Was "The Common Arrangement'? An Inquiry Into John Stuart Mill's Boyhood Reading of Plato. Apeiron 34 (1).
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  37.  19
    M. F. Burnyeat (2004). Fathers and Sons in Plato's Republic and Philebus. Classical Quarterly 54 (1):80-87.
  38.  20
    M. F. Burnyeat (1979). E. N. Tigerstedt: Interpreting Plato. Pp. 157. Stockholm: Almqvist. & Wiksell, 1977. Paper. The Classical Review 29 (01):161-162.
  39. M. F. Burnyeat (2003). Apology 30b 2-4: Socrates, Money, and the Grammar of "Gígnesthai". Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:1-25.
    The framework of this paper is a defence of Burnet's construal of Apology 30b 2-4. Socrates does not claim, as he is standardly translated, that virtue makes you rich, but that virtue makes money and everything el se good for you. This view of the relation between virtue and wealth is paralleled in dialogues of every period, and a sophisticated development of it appears in Aristotle. My philological defence of the philosophically preferable translation extends recent scholarly work on eínai in (...)
     
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  40.  18
    M. F. Burnyeat (1962). Time and Pythagorean Religion. Classical Quarterly 12 (02):248-.
    It is, I think, a fair presumption to suppose that there was some bond uniting all the different aspects of Pythagoras' thought, a bond strong enough to satisfy Pythagoras himself, but loose enough for the to be able, later, to cast off the religious and mystical doctrines without endangering the rest.
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  41. M. F. Burnyeat (2001). Plato. Proceedings of the British Academy 111:1-22.
     
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  42.  7
    M. F. Burnyeat (2013). Dramatic Aspects of Plato's Protagoras. Classical Quarterly 63 (1):419-422.
    In the course of its 53 Stephanus pages Plato's Protagoras uses the verb διαλέγεσθαι 32 times: a frequency considerably greater than that of any other dialogue. The next largest total is 21 occurrences in the Theaetetus . In the vast bulk of the Republic διαλέγεσθαι occurs just 20 times over 294 Stephanus pages. The ratios are striking. In the Protagoras the verb turns up on average once every 1.65 Stephanus pages; in the Theaetetus once every 3.25 pages; in the Republic (...)
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  43.  20
    Nancy Gayer & M. F. Burnyeat (1971). Play and Pleasure. Journal of Philosophy of Education 5 (1):29–36.
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  44.  11
    M. F. Burnyeat (1992). Gregory Vlastos. Phronesis 37 (2):137 - 140.
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  45.  13
    M. F. Burnyeat (1978). Carl Joachim Classen: Sophistik. (Wege der Forschung, clxxxvii.) Pp. viii + 713. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1976. Cloth, DM. 121. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):359-360.
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  46.  2
    M. F. Burnyeat (1977). Examples in Epistemology: Socrates, Theaetetus and G. E. Moore: M. F. Burnyeat. Philosophy 52 (202):381-398.
    Theaetetus, asked what knowledge is, replies that geometry and the other mathematical disciplines are knowledge, and so are crafts like cobbling. Socrates points out that it does not help him to be told how many kinds of knowledge there are when his problem is to know what knowledge itself is, what it means to call geometry or a craft knowledge in the first place—he insists on the generality of his question in the way he often does when his interlocutor, asked (...)
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  47.  4
    M. F. Burnyeat (1993). El escéptico en su lugar y su tiempo. Logos 27:273-306.
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  48.  4
    M. F. Burnyeat (2005). On the Source of Burnet's Construal of Apology 30b 2–4: A Correction. Journal of Hellenic Studies 125:139-142.
    The construal of Apology 30b 2–4 which in JHS 123 (2003) I attributed to John Burnet had appeared in print sixteen years before his edition of Euthyphro, Apology and Crito. I now suggest that it probably originated in the mind of J.A. Smith, who was an undergraduate contemporary of Burnet's at Balliol College, Oxford, and later Waynflete Professor of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy. The unexpected construal, transmitted by Balliol tradition, is typical of Smith's cast of mind.
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  49.  10
    M. F. Burnyeat (1980). Fritz Wehrli: Sotion. (Die Schule des Aristoteles, Texte Und Kommentar, Supplementband 2.) Pp. 71. Basel-Stuttgart: Schwabe, 1978. Paper, 38Sw.Frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):150-.
  50.  10
    M. F. Burnyeat (1980). Tranquility Without a Stop: Timon, Frag. 68. Classical Quarterly 30 (01):86-.
    Translation at this stage would be premature, but three variants in line 3 deserve notice, Bury writes Natorp , followed by Brochard , suggested , Wachsmuth prints a colon instead of a comma after It is not surprising that line 3 has attracted emendation. As it stands, it lacks a verb and has to modify an understood existential.
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