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  1. Y. Kadooka, A. Asai, M. Fukuyama & S. Bito (2014). A Comparative Survey on Potentially Futile Treatments Between Japanese Nurses and Laypeople. Nursing Ethics 21 (1):64-75.
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  2. A. Asai, M. Fukuyama & Y. Kobayashi (2010). Contemporary Japanese View of Life and Death as Depicted in the Film Departures (Okuribito). Medical Humanities 36 (1):31-35.
    Through films, we can see many aspects of a country and its times: culture, morality and religion, and views on life and death. The best films can both entertain audiences and provide viewers with opportunities to think about fundamental human problems. In this article, we use Departures (Okuribito) to examine the contemporary Japanese view of life and death. All sorts of deaths are depicted and each scene provides an insight into the contemporary Japanese view of death. We use the medium (...)
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  3. A. Asai, Y. Sato & M. Fukuyama (2009). An Ethical and Social Examination of Dementia as Depicted in Japanese Film. Medical Humanities 35 (1):39-42.
    The ageing population means that dementia is a serious social problem in Japan. Attitudes toward ageing in Japan are increasingly negative, and views of life and death among older people vary. Numerous ethical problems exist in the medical treatment of dementia. Amidst such conditions, it is important and beneficial to examine films that depict demented patients and to consider the issues raised by these films. Through film we see many aspects of a country and its times: culture and ideology, morality (...)
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  4. M. Fukuyama, A. Asai, K. Itai & S. Bito (2008). A Report on Small Team Clinical Ethics Consultation Programmes in Japan. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):858-862.
    Clinical ethics support, including ethics consultation, has become established in the field of medical practice throughout the world. This practice has been regarded as useful, most notably in the UK and the USA, in solving ethical problems encountered by both medical practitioners and those who receive medical treatment. In Japan, however, few services are available to respond to everyday clinical ethical issues, although a variety of difficult ethical problems arise daily in the medical field: termination of life support, euthanasia and (...)
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