22 found
Sort by:
  1. M. J. Cherry (forthcoming). The Emptiness of Postmodern, Post-Christian Bioethics: An Engelhardtian Reevaluation of the Status of the Field. Christian Bioethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. M. J. Cherry (2013). Ignoring the Data and Endangering Children: Why the Mature Minor Standard for Medical Decision Making Must Be Abandoned. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):315-331.
    In Roper v. Simmons (2005) the United States Supreme Court announced a paradigm shift in jurisprudence. Drawing specifically on mounting scientific evidence that adolescents are qualitatively different from adults in their decision-making capacities, the Supreme Court recognized that adolescents are not adults in all but age. The Court concluded that the overwhelming weight of the psychological and neurophysiological data regarding brain maturation supports the conclusion that adolescents are qualitatively different types of agents than adult persons. The Supreme Court further solidified (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. M. J. Cherry (2012). Building Social and Economic Capital: The Family and Medical Savings Accounts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):526-544.
    Despite the well-documented social, economic, and adaptive advantages for young children, adolescents, and adults, the traditional family in the West is in decline. A growing percentage of men and women choose not to be bound by the traditional moral and social expectations of marriage and family life. Adults are much more likely than in the past to live as sexually active singles, with a concomitant increase in forms of social isolation as well as in the number of children born outside (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. M. J. Cherry (2011). Familial Authority and Christian Bioethics--A Geography of Moral and Social Controversies. Christian Bioethics 17 (3):185-205.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. M. J. Cherry (2010). An "As If" God and an "As If" Religion. Christian Bioethics 16 (2):187-202.
    In this paper, I assess Peter Dabrock's “Drawing distinctions responsibly and concretely: A European Protestant perspective on foundational theological bioethics.” I explore the ways in which Dabrock announces nontraditional Christian assumptions to guide Christian bioethics, engages the secular bioethical agenda on the very terms set by and congenial to the field of secular bioethics, and searches for insights from philosophy and science through which to recast Christian moral judgments. For example, he cites approvingly, as if they were expressive of Christian (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. M. J. Cherry (2010). Parental Authority and Pediatric Bioethical Decision Making. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):553-572.
    In this paper, I offer a view beyond that which would narrowly reduce the role of parents in medical decision making to acting as custodians of the best interests of children and toward an account of family authority and family autonomy. As a fundamental social unit, the good of the family is usually appreciated, at least in part, in terms of its ability successfully to instantiate its core moral and cultural understandings as well as to pass on such commitments to (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. M. J. Cherry (2010). The Illusion of Consensus: Harvesting Human Organs From Prisoners Convicted of Capital Crimes. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):220-222.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. A. S. Iltis & M. J. Cherry (2010). Death Revisited: Rethinking Death and the Dead Donor Rule. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):223-241.
    Traditionally, people were recognized as being dead using cardio-respiratory criteria: individuals who had permanently stopped breathing and whose heart had permanently stopped beating were dead. Technological developments in the middle of the twentieth century and the advent of the intensive care unit made it possible to sustain cardio-respiratory and other functions in patients with severe brain injury who previously would have lost such functions permanently shortly after sustaining a brain injury. What could and should physicians caring for such patients do? (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. M. J. Cherry (2009). Religion Without God, Social Justice Without Christian Charity, and Other Dimensions of the Culture Wars. Christian Bioethics 15 (3):277-299.
    A truly Christian bioethics challenges the nature, substance, and application of secular morality, dividing Christians from non-Christians, accenting central moral differences, and providing content-full forthrightly Christian guidance for action. Consequently, Christian bioethics must be framed within the metaphysical and theological commitments of Traditional Christianity so as to provide proper orientation toward God. In contrast, secular bioethicists routinely present themselves as providing a universal bioethics acceptable to all reasonable and rational persons. Yet, such secular bioethicists habitually insert their own biases and (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. M. J. Cherry (2009). UNESCO, "Universal Bioethics," and State Regulation of Health Risks: A Philosophical Critique. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (3):274-295.
    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's (UNESCO) Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights announces a significant array of welfare entitlements—to personal health and health care, medicine, nutrition, water, improved living conditions, environmental protection, and so forth—as well as corresponding governmental duties to provide for such public health measures, though the simple expedient of announcing that such entitlements are “basic human rights.” The Universal Declaration provides no argument for the legitimacy of the sweeping governmental authority, taxation, and regulation (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. M. J. Cherry (2009). Why Should We Compensate Organ Donors When We Can Continue to Take Organs for Free? A Response to Some of My Critics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (6):649-673.
    In Kidney for Sale by Owner: Human Organs, Transplantation, and the Market, I argued that the market is the most efficient and effective—and morally justified—means of procuring and allocating human organs for transplantation. This special issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy publishes several articles critical of this position and of my arguments mustered in its support. In this essay, I explore the core criticisms these authors raise against my conclusions. I argue that clinging to comfortable, but unfounded, notions (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. M. J. Cherry (2008). Moral Ambiguity, Christian Sectarianism, and Personal Repentance: Reflections on Richard McCormick's Moral Theology. Christian Bioethics 14 (3):283-301.
    This article raises three challenges to Richard McCormick's proportionalism. First, adequately to judge proportionate reason requires the specification of a particular background moral content and metaphysical context. Absent such specification, evaluation of proportionate reason is inherently and deeply ambiguous. Second, to resolve such ambiguity and yet remain Christian, proportionalism must adopt a forthrightly Christian moral content set within a straightforwardly Christian metaphysics. This move will, however, set Christian bioethics off as sectarian—a conclusion McCormick wishes to avoid. Third, even if proportionalism (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. A. S. Iltis & M. J. Cherry (2008). First Do No Harm: Critical Analyses of the Roads to Health Care Reform. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (5):403-415.
    Health care reform poses numerous challenges. A core challenge is to make health care more efficient and effective without causing more harm than benefit. Additionally, those fashioning health-care policy must encourage patients to exercise caution and restraint when expending scarce resources; restrict the ability of politicians to advance their careers by promising alluring but costly entitlements, many of which they will not be able to deliver; face the demographic challenges of an aging population; and avoid regulations that create significant inefficiencies (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. M. J. Cherry (2003). Why Physician-Assisted Suicide Perpetuates the Idolatry of Medicine. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):245-271.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. M. J. Cherry (2002). Searching for the Truly Human: Standing at the Precipice of a Post-Christian Age. Christian Bioethics 8 (3):307-331.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. M. J. Cherry (2001). Foundations of the Culture Wars: Compassion, Love, and Human Dignity. Christian Bioethics 7 (3):299-316.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. M. J. Cherry (2000). Body Parts and the Market Place: Insights From Thomistic Philosophy. Christian Bioethics 6 (2):171-193.
    With rare exception, Roman Catholic moral theologians condemn the sale of human organs for transplantation. Yet, such criticism, while rhetorically powerful, often oversimplifies complex issues. Arguments for the prohibition of a market in human organs may, therefore, depend on a single premise, or a cluster of dubious and allied premises, which when examined cannot hold. In what follows, I will examine the ways in which such arguments are configured. For example, Thomas Aquinas'(1224–1274) understandings of embodiment and moral uses of the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. M. J. Cherry (2000). The Body for Charity, Profit and Holiness: Commerce in Human Body Parts. Christian Bioethics 6 (2):127-138.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. M. J. Cherry (1997). Patients, Values, and Statistical Utility. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (6):529-540.
  20. M. J. Cherry (1996). Bioethics and the Construction of Medical Reality. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (4):357-373.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. M. J. Cherry (1996). Suffering Strangers: An Historical, Metaphysical, and Epistemological Non-Ecumenical Interchange. Christian Bioethics 2 (2):253-266.
    To comprehend pain, disease, death and suffering as being meaningful - beyond the firing of synapses, the collapse of human abilities, and the mere end of life - requires a context in which to evaluate essential connotations, as well as to place and integrate understandings. If pain and suffering are to have enduring significance, they must be situated within a nest of ontological background assumptions, standards of inquiry, and epistemological foundations. Where secular bioethics fails to give deep meaning to suffering, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. B. A. Lustig & M. J. Cherry (1996). Authority in Christian Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 2 (1):1-15.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation