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  1. Michael McKeon (forthcoming). A Defense of Dialectical Method in Literary History. Diacritics.
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  2. Matthew W. McKeon (2013). On the Rationale for Distinguishing Arguments From Explanations. Argumentation 27 (3):283-303.
    Even with the lack of consensus on the nature of an argument, the thesis that explanations and arguments are distinct is near orthodoxy in well-known critical thinking texts and in the more advanced argumentation literature. In this paper, I reconstruct two rationales for distinguishing arguments from explanations. According to one, arguments and explanations are essentially different things because they have different structures. According to the other, while some explanations and arguments may have the same structure, they are different things because (...)
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  3. Michael McKeon (2013). The Morality of Daycare. Philosophia 41 (1):97-107.
    An increasing number of parents are electing to use daycare to assist them with their parenting from infancy onward. Strikingly, there is scant discussion of whether or not such a practice is morally permissible. In this paper, I shall discuss three different arguments that I believe are implicitly thought to support the use of daycare. I shall argue that the current widespread use of daycare, particularly with respect to infant children, often involves arbitrarily subjugating the needs of children in favor (...)
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  4. Matthew McKeon (2012). Review of" The Tarskian Turn: Deflationism and Axiomatic Truth". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):19.
  5. Matthew W. McKeon (2010). The Concept of Logical Consequence: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Peter Lang Pub..
    Introduction -- The concept of logical consequence -- Tarski's characterization of the common concept of logical consequence -- The logical consequence relation has a modal element -- The logical consequence relation is formal -- The logical consequence relation is A priori -- Logical and non-logical terminology -- The meanings of logical terms explained in terms of their semantic properties -- The meanings of logical terms explained in terms of their inferential properties -- Model-theoretic and deductive-theoretic conceptions of logic -- Linguistic (...)
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  6. Matthew William McKeon (2009). A Plea for Logical Objects. Synthese 167 (1):163 - 182.
    An account of validity that makes what is invalid conditional on how many individuals there are is what I call a conditional account of validity. Here I defend conditional accounts against a criticism derived from Etchemendy’s well-known criticism of the model-theoretic analysis of validity. The criticism is essentially that knowledge of the size of the universe is non-logical and so by making knowledge of the extension of validity depend on knowledge of how many individuals there are, conditional accounts fail to (...)
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  7. M. McKeon (2006). Forall X: An Introduction to Formal Logic, Version 1.11, by PD Magnus. Teaching Philosophy 29 (4).
     
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  8. Matthew McKeon (2006). Forall X: An Introduction to Formal Logic, Version 1.11. Teaching Philosophy 4:387-390.
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  9. Matthew McKeon (2006). Forall X. Teaching Philosophy 29 (4):387-390.
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  10. M. McKeon (2005). A Defense of the Kripkean Account of Logical Truth in First-Order Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (3):305 - 326.
    This paper responds to criticism of the Kripkean account of logical truth in first-order modal logic. The criticism, largely ignored in the literature, claims that when the box and diamond are interpreted as the logical modality operators, the Kripkean account is extensionally incorrect because it fails to reflect the fact that all sentences stating truths about what is logically possible are themselves logically necessary. I defend the Kripkean account by arguing that some true sentences about logical possibility are not logically (...)
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  11. Matthew McKeon (2004). On the Substitutional Characterization of First-Order Logical Truth. History and Philosophy of Logic 25 (3):205-224.
    I consider the well-known criticism of Quine's characterization of first-order logical truth that it expands the class of logical truths beyond what is sanctioned by the model-theoretic account. Briefly, I argue that at best the criticism is shallow and can be answered with slight alterations in Quine's account. At worse the criticism is defective because, in part, it is based on a misrepresentation of Quine. This serves not only to clarify Quine's position, but also to crystallize what is and what (...)
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  12. Matthew Mckeon (2004). Logic and Existential Commitment. Logique Et Analyse 47:195-214.
     
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  13. Matthew McKeon, Logical Consequence, Deductive-Theoretic Conceptions. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14. Matthew McKeon, Logical Consequence, Philosophical Considerations. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  15. Matthew McKeon (2004). Review of “Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):24.
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  16. C. McGinn & Matthew McKeon (2003). REVIEWS-Logical Properties: Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, Truth. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 9 (1):39-41.
    Identity, existence, predication, necessity, and truth are fundamental philosophical concerns. Colin McGinn treats them both philosophically and logically, aiming for maximum clarity and minimum pointless formalism. He contends that there are real logical properties that challenge naturalistic metaphysical outlooks. These concepts are not definable, though we can say a good deal about how they work. The aim of Logical Properties is to bring philosophy back to philosophical logic.
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  17. Matthew McKeon (2003). McGinn Colin. Logical Properties: Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, Truth. Clarendon Press, Oxford 2000, Vi+ 114 Pp. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 9 (1):39-42.
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  18. Matthew Mckeon (1999). Bertrand Russell and Logical Truth. Philosophia 27 (3-4):541-553.
    I expose a tension in Bertrand Russell's, _Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, between his account of logical truth and his view that logical truth is knowable without taking into account what the world is like. Russell makes the logical truth of a sentence turn on the actual truth of its second-order universal closure. But this results in making logical truth relative to the number of worldly individuals. I aim to use the tension in _Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy to classify the status (...)
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  19. Matthew McKeon (1996). Logical Truth in Modal Logic. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):351-361.
    In this paper, I consider the criticism due to Hartry Field, John Pollack, William Hanson and James Hawthorne that the Kripkean requirement that a logical truth in modal logic be true at all possible worlds in _all quantified model structures is unmotivated and misses some logical truths. These authors do not see the basis for making the logical truth of a modal sentence turn on more than the model structure given by one reading of the modal operator(s) which occur in (...)
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  20. M. McKeon (1983). The Origins of Aesthetic Value. Telos 1983 (57):63-82.
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