Search results for 'M. Nobel' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. M. Nobel (1978). Incest. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (2):64-70.score: 240.0
    This paper is based on two presentations under the auspices of thf Edinburgh Medical Group in 1976. Dr Noble and Professor Mason, explore the incidence of incest and society's attitudes to it from legal, anthropological, medical and social viewpoints. They place this in a world context by looking at the universal prohibition of incest and the theories related to that taboo. In conclusion, they suggest that there seem to be sufficient sensible grounds on which to base a reappraisal of attitudes (...)
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  2. C. B. Osmond, M. P. Austin, J. A. Berry, W. D. Billings, J. S. Boyer, J. W. H. Dacey, P. S. Nobel, S. D. Smith & W. E. Winner (1987). Stress Physiology and the Distribution of Plants. BioScience 37 (1):38-48.score: 240.0
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  3. J. M. (2002). National Politics and International Trends: EMBO and the Making of Molecular Biology in Spain (1960-1975). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (3):473-487.score: 120.0
    From the mid-1960s onwards, a set of Spanish molecular biology research groups emerged in Spain. The factors contributing to this included: the return of a group of molecular biologists from their postdoctoral period abroad, the negotiations for the return of Spanish-born Nobel prize winner Severo Ochoa from New York, the negotiations for Spanish membership in the European Conference of Molecular Biology, and national policy towards university reform. As a result, the early molecular biologists' research groups began to be recognised (...)
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  4. M. Dardo (2004). Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    Using an original approach, Mauro Dardo recounts the major achievements of twentieth-century physics--including relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, the invention of the transistor and the laser, superconductivity, binary pulsars, and the Bose-Einstein condensate--as each emerged. His year-by-year chronicle, biographies and revealing personal anecdotes help bring to life the main events since the first Nobel Prize was awarded in 1901. The work of the most famous physicists of the twentieth century--including the Curies, Bohr, Heisenberg, Einstein, Fermi, Feynman, Gell-Mann, (...)
     
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  5. M. Low (2001). From Einstein to Shirakawa: The Nobel Prize in Japan. Minerva 39 (4):446-460.score: 42.0
    There have been two Japanese Nobel laureates in chemistry, three in physics, and one in the category of medicine or physiology. This relatively small number has been attributed to shortcomings in Japanese science. The award of the Physics Prize in 1949 to Hideki Yukawa and to his colleague Sin'itirô Tomonaga in 1965 gave public evidence of how Japanese could make outstanding individual contributions to science. Paradoxically, the Prize also reinforced a belief that such men formed part of a traditional (...)
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  6. H. Alfven, M. Arnold, C. Atwood, K. Baedecker, Baker Jr, A. J. Balfour, A. Baring, A. E. Becquerel, E. T. Bell & J. Ben-David (1982). This Index Contains All the Names Referred to in the Editorial Introductions, Plus Those in the Main Text of the Readings. It Does Not Contain All the Names in the Notes and References to the Readings, nor Those in the Bibliography, Which is Not Indexed. Surnames Only Used Eponymously (Eg Delaney Clause; Nobel Prize. In Barry Barnes & David O. Edge (eds.), Science in Context: Readings in the Sociology of Science. Mit Press. 365.score: 36.0
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  7. P. J. M. Velthhuys-Bechtold & H. G. Van Bueren (1995). Inventory of the Papers of Pieter Zeeman (1865-1943), Physicist and Nobel Prize Winner, C. 1877-1946. Annals of Science 52 (3):310.score: 36.0
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  8. Gerald M. Edelman (1989). The Remembered Present: A Biological Theory of Consciousness. Basic Books.score: 30.0
    Having laid the groundwork in his critically acclaimed books Neural Darwinism (Basic Books, 1987) and Topobiology (Basic Books, 1988), Nobel laureate Gerald M. Edelman now proposes a comprehensive theory of consciousness in The Remembered ...
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  9. Matthew Davidson (2009). On Roderick Chisholm. Philosophy Now 75:32-33.score: 24.0
    Roderick M. Chisholm (1916-1999) was one of the most important philosophical thinkers of the 20th century. His influence on epistemology (the theory of knowledge) and metaphysics cannot be understated; indeed, it is difficult to conceive of what these fields would be like today without the impact of Chisholm. Were there a Nobel Prize in philosophy, Chisholm surely would have won it.
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  10. Marek Hudon (2009). Should Access to Credit Be a Right? Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):17 - 28.score: 24.0
    Discussion on financial ethics increasingly includes the problem of exclusion of the poorer segments of society from the financial system and access to credit. This paper explores the ethical dimensions surrounding the concept of a human right to credit. If access to credit is directly instrumental to economic development, poverty reduction and the improved welfare of all citizens, then one can proclaim, as Nobel Prize Laureate M. Yunus has done, that it is a moral necessity to establish credit as (...)
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  11. Geraint Rees, An Index to Quantify an Individual's Scientific Research Output.score: 24.0
    For the few scientists that earn a Nobel prize, the im- (h = 75), D.J. Scalapino (h = 75), G. Parisi (h = 73), pact and relevance of their research work is unquestion- S.G. Louie (h = 70), R. Jackiw (h = 69), F. Wilczek able. Among the rest of us, how does one quantify the (h = 68), C. Vafa (h = 66), M.B. Maple (h = 66), D.J. cumulative impact and relevance of an individual’s sci- Gross (...)
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  12. Soshichi Uchii, The Responsibility of the Scientist.score: 24.0
    The problems of the social responsibility of the scientist became a subject of public debate after the World War II in Japan, thanks to the activities and publications of Yukawa and Tomonaga. And such authors as J. Karaki, M.Taketani, Y. Murakami, and S. Fujinaga continued discussion in their books. However, many people seem to be still unaware of the most important source of these problems. As I see it, one of the most important treatments of these problems was the Franck (...)
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  13. Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.) (2008). Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Amartya Sen has made deep and lasting contributions to the academic disciplines of economics, philosophy, and the social sciences more broadly. He has engaged in policy dialogue and public debate, advancing the cause of a human development focused policy agenda, and a tolerant and democratic polity. This argumentative Indian has made the case for the poorest of the poor, and for plurality in cultural perspective. It is not surprising that he has won the highest awards, ranging from the Nobel (...)
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  14. Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.) (2008). Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume II: Society, Institutions, and Development. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Amartya Sen has made deep and lasting contributions to the academic disciplines of economics, philosophy, and the social sciences more broadly. He has engaged in policy dialogue and public debate, advancing the cause of a human development focused policy agenda, and a tolerant and democratic polity. This argumentative Indian has made the case for the poorest of the poor, and for plurality in cultural perspective. It is not surprising that he has won the highest awards, ranging from the Nobel (...)
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  15. Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.) (2008). Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume II: Society, Institutions, and Development. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Amartya Sen has made deep and lasting contributions to the academic disciplines of economics, philosophy, and the social sciences more broadly. He has engaged in policy dialogue and public debate, advancing the cause of a human development focused policy agenda, and a tolerant and democratic polity. This argumentative Indian has made the case for the poorest of the poor, and for plurality in cultural perspective. It is not surprising that he has won the highest awards, ranging from the Nobel (...)
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  16. John Cornwell (ed.) (1995). Nature's Imagination: The Frontiers of Scientific Vision. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    "A person is not explainable in molecular, field-theoretical, or physiological terms alone." With that declaration, Nobel laureate Gerald M. Edelman goes straight to the heart of Nature's Imagination, a vibrant and important collection of essays by some of the world's foremost scientists. Ever since the Enlightenment, the authors write, science has pursued reductionism: the idea that the whole can be understood by examining and explaining each of its parts. But as this book shows, scientists in every discipline are reaching (...)
     
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  17. Grant Hamilton (2011). On Representation: Deleuze and Coetzee on the Colonized Subject. Editions Rodopi.score: 24.0
    In this important new study, Hamilton establishes and develops innovative links between the sites of postcolonial literary theory, the fiction of the South African/Australian academic and Nobel Prize-winning writer J.M. Coetzee, and the work of the French poststructuralist philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Centering on the key postcolonial problematic of representation, Hamilton argues that if one approaches the colonial subject through Gilles Deleuze’s rewriting of subjectivity, then a transcendent configuration of the colonial subject is revealed. Importantly, it is this rendition of (...)
     
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  18. Gerald M. Edelman & Giulio Tononi (2000). A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination. Basic Books.score: 12.0
    A Nobel Prize-winning scientist and a leading brain researcher show how the brain creates conscious experience.
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  19. M. E. (2003). Henry Dale, Histamine and Anaphylaxis: Reflections on the Role of Chance in the History of Allergy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):455-472.score: 12.0
    The role of the Nobel Laureate Henry Dale (1875-1968) in the history of allergy and the association of anaphylactic conditions with the liberation of histamine is often overlooked. This paper examines his work in this field in the broader context of his researches into endogenous mediators of normal physiological and abnormal pathological functioning. It also assesses the impact of his working environment, especially the unique conditions he enjoyed at the beginning of the twentieth century in the Wellcome Physiological Research (...)
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  20. Cyrus C. M. Mody (2009). Introduction. Perspectives on Science 17 (2):pp. 111-122.score: 12.0
    In October of 2002, Rick Smalley, Nobel laureate chemist at Rice University, was pondering what to say to a Congressional Hispanic Science and Literacy Forum hearing in Harlingen, Texas. Smalley used the opportunity to craft an all-encompassing justification for science's importance in the modern world-a justification so persuasive and broad it could be presented to any audience on any occasion. Indeed, variants of his talk have since been given some 200 times, from Dallas to Dubai.
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  21. Alexander M. Petersen, Ioannis Pavlidis & Ioanna Semendeferi (2014). A Quantitative Perspective on Ethics in Large Team Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):923-945.score: 12.0
    The gradual crowding out of singleton and small team science by large team endeavors is challenging key features of research culture. It is therefore important for the future of scientific practice to reflect upon the individual scientist’s ethical responsibilities within teams. To facilitate this reflection we show labor force trends in the US revealing a skewed growth in academic ranks and increased levels of competition for promotion within the system; we analyze teaming trends across disciplines and national borders demonstrating why (...)
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  22. Trienke M. Van der Spek (2006). Selling a Theory: The Role of Molecular Models in J. H. Van 'T Hoff's Stereochemistry Theory. Annals of Science 63 (2):157-177.score: 12.0
    Summary In 1874, the Dutch chemist and Nobel prizewinner Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff (1852?1911) laid the foundations for stereochemistry with a publication in which he openly suggested that molecules were real physical entities with a three-dimensional structure. He visualized this new spatial concept with illustrations, but also with the help of small cardboard molecular models, which he made himself. Some of these models have survived the ravages of time and are among the oldest molecular models in the world (...)
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