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Martin Peterson [52]Michael L. Peterson [12]Margaret J. Peterson [12]Margaret Jean Peterson [7]
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Profile: Martin Peterson (Eindhoven University of Technology)
Profile: Michael Peterson
Profile: Mark Peterson (University of Wisconsin Colleges)
Profile: Mats Anders Olof Peterson (Lund Institute of Technology)
  1. J. Adam Carter & Martin Peterson (forthcoming). On the Epistemology of the Precautionary Principle. Erkenntnis:1-13.
    In this paper we present two distinctly epistemological puzzles that arise for one who aspires to defend the precautionary principle. The first puzzle involves an application of contextualism in epistemology; and the second puzzle concerns the task of defending a plausible version of the precautionary principle that would not be invalidated by the de minimis principle.
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  2. Martin Peterson & Sjoerd D. Zwart (forthcoming). Values and Norms in Modeling. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  3. Laura Cacciamani, Alisabeth A. Ayars & Mary A. Peterson (2014). Spatially Rearranged Object Parts Can Facilitate Perception of Intact Whole Objects. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  4. Evan Selinger, Don Ihde, Ibo van de Poel, Martin Peterson & Peter-Paul Verbeek (2014). Erratum To: Book Symposium on Peter Paul Verbeek's Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):315-315.
    Erratum to: Philos. Technol.DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0054-3The original version of this article was inadvertently published with an incorrect title, author group and layout. The corrected version was published in Philos. Technol. (2012) 25:605–631 (DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0058-z).
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  5. David Chan, Mary A. Peterson, Morgan D. Barense & Jay Pratt (2013). How Action Influences Object Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  6. James S. Diana, Hillary S. Egna, Thierry Chopin, Mark S. Peterson, Ling Cao, Robert Pomeroy, Marc Verdegem, William T. Slack, Melba G. Bondad-Reantaso & Felipe Cabello (2013). Responsible Aquaculture in 2050: Valuing Local Conditions and Human Innovations Will Be Key to Success. BioScience 63 (4):255-262.
  7. Sven Diekmann & Martin Peterson (2013). The Role of Non-Epistemic Values in Engineering Models. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):207-218.
    We argue that non-epistemic values, including moral ones, play an important role in the construction and choice of models in science and engineering. Our main claim is that non-epistemic values are not only “secondary values” that become important just in case epistemic values leave some issues open. Our point is, on the contrary, that non-epistemic values are as important as epistemic ones when engineers seek to develop the best model of a process or problem. The upshot is that models are (...)
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  8. Barbro Fröding & Martin Peterson (2013). Why Computer Games Can Be Essential for Human Flourishing. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 11 (2):81-91.
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  9. Rafaela Hillerbrand & Martin Peterson (2013). Nuclear Power is Neither Right Nor Wrong: The Case for a Tertium Datur in the Ethics of Technology. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):1-13.
    The debate over the civilian use of nuclear power is highly polarised. We argue that a reasonable response to this deep disagreement is to maintain that advocates of both camps should modify their positions. According to the analysis we propose, nuclear power is neither entirely right nor entirely wrong, but rather right and wrong to some degree. We are aware that this non-binary analysis of nuclear power is controversial from a theoretical point of view. Utilitarians, Kantians, and other moral theorists (...)
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  10. Mark Peterson (2013). Why They Mattered: The Return of Politics to Puritan New England. Modern Intellectual History 10 (3):683-696.
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  11. Martin Peterson (2013). A Generalization of the Pasadena Puzzle. Dialectica 67 (4):597-603.
    By generalizing the Pasadena puzzle introduced by Nover and Hájek (2004) we show that the sum total of value produced by an act can be made to converge to any real number by applying the Riemann rearrangement theorem, even if the scenario faced by the decision maker is non-probabilistic and fully predictable. A wide range of solutions put forward in the literature for solving the original puzzle cannot solve this generalized version of the Pasadena puzzle.
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  12. Martin Peterson (2013). New Technologies Should Not Be Treated as Social Experiments. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):346-348.
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  13. Martin Peterson (2013). The Dimensions of Consequentialism. Cambridge University Press.
    Consequentialism, one of the major theories of normative ethics, maintains that the moral rightness of an act is determined solely by the act's consequences and its alternatives. The traditional form of consequentialism is one-dimensional, in that the rightness of an act is a function of a single moral aspect, such as the sum total of wellbeing it produces. In this book Martin Peterson introduces a new type of consequentialist theory: multidimensional consequentialism. According to this theory, an act's moral rightness depends (...)
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  14. Martin Peterson & Per Sandin (2013). The Last Man Argument Revisited. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1):121-133.
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  15. Krist Vaesen, Martin Peterson & Bart Van Bezooijen (2013). The Reliability of Armchair Intuitions. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):559-578.
    Armchair philosophers have questioned the significance of recent work in experimental philosophy by pointing out that experiments have been conducted on laypeople and undergraduate students. To challenge a practice that relies on expert intuitions, so the armchair objection goes, one needs to demonstrate that expert intuitions rather than those of ordinary people are sensitive to contingent facts such as cultural, linguistic, socio-economic, or educational background. This article does exactly that. Based on two empirical studies on populations of 573 and 203 (...)
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  16. N. Espinoza & M. Peterson (2012). How to Depolarise the Ethical Debate Over Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (and Other Ethical Debates Too!). Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):496-500.
    The contention of this paper is that the current ethical debate over embryonic stem cell research is polarised to an extent that is not warranted by the underlying ethical conflict. It is argued that the ethical debate can be rendered more nuanced, and less polarised, by introducing non-binary notions of moral rightness and wrongness. According to the view proposed, embryonic stem cell research—and possibly other controversial activities too—can be considered ‘a little bit right and a little bit wrong’. If this (...)
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  17. Nicolas Espinoza & Martin Peterson (2012). Risk and Mid-Level Moral Principles. Bioethics 26 (1):8-14.
    We discuss ethical aspects of risk-taking with special focus on principlism and mid-level moral principles. A new distinction between the strength of an obligation and the degree to which it is valid is proposed. We then use this distinction for arguing that, in cases where mid-level moral principles come into conflict, the moral status of the act under consideration may be indeterminate, in a sense rendered precise in the paper. We apply this thought to issues related to pandemic influenza vaccines. (...)
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  18. Barbro Fröding & Martin Peterson (2012). Why Virtual Friendship is No Genuine Friendship. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):201-207.
    Based on a modern reading of Aristotle’s theory of friendship, we argue that virtual friendship does not qualify as genuine friendship. By ‘virtual friendship’ we mean the type of friendship that exists on the internet, and seldom or never is combined with real life interaction. A ‘traditional friendship’ is, in contrast, the type of friendship that involves substantial real life interaction, and we claim that only this type can merit the label ‘genuine friendship’ and thus qualify as morally valuable. The (...)
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  19. Johan E. Gustafsson & Martin Peterson (2012). A Computer Simulation of the Argument From Disagreement. Synthese 184 (3):387–405.
    In this paper we shed new light on the Argument from Disagreement by putting it to test in a computer simulation. According to this argument widespread and persistent disagreement on ethical issues indicates that our moral opinions are not influenced by any moral facts, either because no such facts exist or because they are epistemically inaccessible or inefficacious for some other reason. Our simulation shows that if our moral opinions were influenced at least a little bit by moral facts, we (...)
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  20. Rosemary Lowry & Martin Peterson (2012). Cost-Benefit Analysis and Non-Utilitarian Ethics. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):1470594-11416767.
    Cost-benefit analysis is commonly understood to be intimately connected with utilitarianism and incompatible with other moral theories, particularly those that focus on deontological concepts such as rights. We reject this claim and argue that cost-benefit analysis can take moral rights as well as other non-utilitarian moral considerations into account in a systematic manner. We discuss three ways of doing this, and claim that two of them (output filters and input filters) can account for a wide range of rights-based moral theories, (...)
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  21. Martin Peterson (2012). Multi-Dimensional Consequentialism. Ratio 25 (2):177-194.
    This article introduces and explores a distinction between multi-dimensional and one-dimensional consequentialist moral theories. One-dimensional consequentialists believe that an act's deontic status depends on just one aspect of the act, such as the sum total of wellbeing it produces, or the sum total of priority- or equality-adjusted wellbeing. Multi-dimensional consequentialists believe that an act's deontic status depends on more than one aspect. They may, for instance, believe that the sum total of wellbeing produced by an act and the degree to (...)
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  22. Martin Peterson & Barbro Fröding (2012). Virtuous Choice and Parity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):71-82.
    This article seeks to contribute to the discussion on the nature of choice in virtue theory. If several different actions are available to the virtuous agent, they are also likely to vary in their degree of virtue, at least in some situations. Yet, it is widely agreed that once an action is recognised as virtuous there is no higher level of virtue. In this paper we discuss how the virtue theorist could accommodate both these seemingly conflicting ideas. We discuss this (...)
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  23. Mary Peterson (2012). Plasticity, Competition, and Task Effects in Object Perception. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 253--262.
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  24. Evan Selinger, Don Ihde, Ibo Poel, Martin Peterson & Peter-Paul Verbeek (2012). Erratum To: Book Symposium on Peter Paul Verbeek's Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):605-631.
    Erratum to: Book Symposium on Peter Paul Verbeek’s Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things . Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011 Content Type Journal Article Category Erratum Pages 1-27 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0058-z Authors Evan Selinger, Dept. Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, USA Don Ihde, Dept. Philosophy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA Ibo van de Poel, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands Martin Peterson, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, the Netherlands Peter-Paul Verbeek, Dept. Philosophy, (...)
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  25. Christian Barry & Matt Peterson (2011). Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis? In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave.
  26. Barbro Fröding & Martin Peterson (2011). Animals and Friendship: A Reply to Rowlands. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (2):187-189.
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  27. Fröding & Martin Peterson (2011). Animal Ethics Based on Friendship. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):58-69.
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  28. Rosemary Lowry & Martin Peterson (2011). Pure Time Preference. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (4):490-508.
    Pure time preference is a preference for something to come at one point in time rather than another merely because of when it occurs in time. In opposition to Sidgwick, Ramsey, Rawls, and Parfit we argue that it is not always irrational to be guided by pure time preferences. We argue that even if the mere difference of location in time is not a rational ground for a preference, time may nevertheless be a normatively neutral ground for a preference, and (...)
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  29. M. K. Peterson (2011). Salvation and Health: Why the Church Needs Psychotherapy. Christian Bioethics 17 (3):277-298.
    The roots of much of Western medicine lie in the Christian monastic tradition and its commitment to nonstigmatizing compassionate care throughout the life cycle and to the ideal of empathic personal connection between physicians, patients, and the communities and relationships in which both of these are embedded. In the modern West, these Christianly informed aspects of medicine are increasingly being undercut as medical care becomes ever more specialized, technologized, and depersonalized. At the same time, there exist a variety of efforts (...)
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  30. Martin Peterson (2011). A New Twist to the St. Petersburg Paradox. Journal of Philosophy 108 (12):697-699.
    In this paper I add a new twist to Colyvan's version of the Petrograd paradox.
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  31. Martin Peterson (2011). Can Technological Artefacts Be Moral Agents? Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):411-424.
    In this paper we discuss the hypothesis that, ‘moral agency is distributed over both humans and technological artefacts’, recently proposed by Peter-Paul Verbeek. We present some arguments for thinking that Verbeek is mistaken. We argue that artefacts such as bridges, word processors, or bombs can never be (part of) moral agents. After having discussed some possible responses, as well as a moderate view proposed by Illies and Meijers, we conclude that technological artefacts are neutral tools that are at most bearers (...)
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  32. Martin Peterson (2011). Is There an Ethics of Algorithms? Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):251-260.
    We argue that some algorithms are value-laden, and that two or more persons who accept different value-judgments may have a rational reason to design such algorithms differently. We exemplify our claim by discussing a set of algorithms used in medical image analysis: In these algorithms it is often necessary to set certain thresholds for whether e.g. a cell should count as diseased or not, and the chosen threshold will partly depend on the software designer’s preference between avoiding false positives and (...)
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  33. Martin Peterson (2011). Pandemic Influenza and Utilitarianism. Bioethics 25 (5):290-291.
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  34. Christian Barry & Matthew Peterson (2010). Dealing Fairly with the Costs to the Poor of the Global Financial Crisis. In Iain MacNeil & Justin O'Brien (eds.), The Future of Financial Regulation. Hart.
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  35. M. Peterson, A. Hollis & T. Pogge (2010). A Critique in Need of Critique. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):178-185.
    Is it really necessary to add something like the Health Impact Fund to the existing global patent system? We can divide this question into two parts. First, is there something seriously wrong with the status quo and, if so, what exactly is it? Second, how do we best go about solving the problem; that is, how does the design of the reform proposal address the flaws in the status quo? Jorn Sonderholm, in his critique of the Health Impact Fund, or (...)
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  36. Martin Peterson (2010). A Royal Road to Consequentialism? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):153-169.
    To consequentialise a moral theory means to account for moral phenomena usually described in nonconsequentialist terms, such as rights, duties, and virtues, in a consequentialist framework. This paper seeks to show that all moral theories can be consequentialised. The paper distinguishes between different interpretations of the consequentialiser’s thesis, and emphasises the need for a cardinal ranking of acts. The paper also offers a new answer as to why consequentialising moral theories is important: This yields crucial methodological insights about how to (...)
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  37. Martin Peterson (2010). Can Consequentialists Honour the Special Moral Status of Persons? Utilitas 22 (4):434-446.
    It is widely believed that consequentialists are committed to the claim that persons are mere containers for well-being. In this article I challenge this view by proposing a new version of consequentialism, according to which the identities of persons matter. The new theory, two-dimensional prioritarianism, is a natural extension of traditional prioritarianism. Two-dimensional prioritarianism holds that wellbeing matters more for persons who are at a low absolute level than for persons who are at a higher level and that it is (...)
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  38. Martin Peterson (2010). Review of Paul Weirich, Collective Rationality: Equilibrium in Cooperative Games. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  39. Martin Peterson (2010). Some Versions of the Number Problem Have No Solution. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):439-451.
    This article addresses Taruek’s much discussed Number Problem from a non-consequentialist point of view. I argue that some versions of the Number Problem have no solution, meaning that no alternative is at least as choice-worthy as the others, and that the best way to behave in light of such moral indeterminacy is to let chance make the decision. I contrast my proposal with F M <span class='Hi'>Kamm</span>’s nonconsequentialist argument for saving the greatest number, the Argument for Best Outcomes, which I (...)
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  40. Martin Peterson (2010). Theory of Decision Under Uncertainty , Itzak Gilboa. Cambridge University Press, 2009. XIV + 215 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):254-258.
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  41. Norman Daniels, Sherry Glied, Mark Peterson & Uwe Reinhardt, American Values in Health Care: A Case of Cognitive Dissonance - Symposium on the Tanner Lecture on Human Values.
    Commentators on Uwe Reinhardt's Tanner Lecture. The Tanner Lectures are a collection of educational and scientific discussions relating to human values. Conducted by leaders in their fields, the lectures are presented at prestigious educational facilities around the world.
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  42. Margaret Kim Peterson & Dwight N. Peterson (2009). God Does Not Want to Write Your Love Story. In D. Brent Laytham (ed.), God Does Not--: Entertain, Play Matchmaker, Hurry, Demand Blood, Cure Every Illness. Brazos Press.
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  43. Martin Peterson (2009). An Introduction to Decision Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    This up-to-date introduction to decision theory offers comprehensive and accessible discussions of decision-making under ignorance and risk, the foundations of utility theory, the debate over subjective and objective probability, Bayesianism, causal decision theory, game theory, and social choice theory. No mathematical skills are assumed, and all concepts and results are explained in non-technical and intuitive as well as more formal ways. There are over 100 exercises with solutions, and a glossary of key terms and concepts. An emphasis on foundational aspects (...)
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  44. Martin Peterson (2009). The Mixed Solution to the Number Problem. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (2):166-177.
    You must either save a group of m people or a group of n people. If there are no morally relevant diff erences among the people, which group should you save? is problem is known as the number problem. e recent discussion has focussed on three proposals: (i) Save the greatest number of people, (ii) Toss a fair coin, or (iii) Set up a weighted lottery, in which the probability of saving m people is m / m + n , (...)
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  45. Michael L. Peterson (ed.) (2009). Reason & Religious Belief: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    What is the status of belief in God? Must a rational case be made or can such belief be properly basic? Is it possible to reconcile the concept of a good God with evil and suffering? In light of great differences among religions, can only one religion be true? The most comprehensive work of its kind, Reason and Religious Belief, now in its third edition, explores these and other perennial questions in the philosophy of religion. Drawing from the best in (...)
     
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  46. Per Sandin & Martin Peterson (2009). Guest Editors' Introduction. Philosophy of Management 8 (2):1-2.
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  47. Luca Tommasi, Mary A. Peterson & Lynn Nadel (eds.) (2009). Cognitive Biology: Evolutionary and Developmental Perspectives on Mind, Brain, and Behavior. The Mit Press.
    An overview of current research at the intersection of psychology and biology,integrating evolutionary and developmental data and explanations.
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  48. M. Beck, B. Angelone, D. Levin, M. Peterson & D. Varakin (2008). Implicit Learning for Probable Changes in a Visual Change Detection Task. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1192-1208.
  49. Madelyn M. Peterson (2008). Response. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):223-224.
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  50. Martin Peterson (2008). The Moral Importance of Selecting People Randomly. Bioethics 22 (6):321–327.
    This article discusses some ethical principles for distributing pandemic influenza vaccine and other indivisible goods. I argue that a number of principles for distributing pandemic influenza vaccine recently adopted by several national governments are morally unacceptable because they put too much emphasis on utilitarian considerations, such as the ability of the individual to contribute to society. Instead, it would be better to distribute vaccine by setting up a lottery. The argument for this view is based on a purely consequentialist account (...)
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