33 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
M. Spriggs [18]Merle Spriggs [15]
  1. Craig L. Fry, Merle Spriggs, Michael Arnold & Chris Pearce (forthcoming). Unresolved Ethical Challenges for the Australian Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) System: Key Informant Interview Findings. Ajob Empirical Bioethics:00-00.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. M. Spriggs & L. Gillam (forthcoming). Deception of Children in Research. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Rosalind McDougall, Clare Delany, Merle Spriggs & Lynn Gillam (2014). Collaboration in Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Method for Achieving “Balanced Accountability”. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):47-48.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. M. Spriggs, M. V. Arnold, C. M. Pearce & C. Fry (2012). Ethical Questions Must Be Considered for Electronic Health Records. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):535-539.
    National electronic health record initiatives are in progress in many countries around the world but the debate about the ethical issues and how they are to be addressed remains overshadowed by other issues. The discourse to which all others are answerable is a technical discourse, even where matters of privacy and consent are concerned. Yet a focus on technical issues and a failure to think about ethics are cited as factors in the failure of the UK health record system. In (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Merle Spriggs (2012). Justifying Pediatric Research Not Expected to Benefit Child Subjects. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):42 - 44.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 42-44, January 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Merle Spriggs (2011). Consent in Cyberspace: Internet-Based Research Involving Young People. Monash Bioethics Review 28 (4):32-1.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Clare Delany, Merle Spriggs, Craig L. Fry & Lynn Gillam (2010). The Unique Nature of Clinical Ethics in Allied Health Pediatrics: Implications for Ethics Education. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (04):471-480.
    Ethics education is recognized as an integral component of health professionals’ education and has been occurring in various guises in the curricula of health professional training in many countries since at least the 1970s. However, there are a number of different aims and approaches adopted by individual educators, programs, and, importantly, different health professions that may be characterized according to strands or trends in ethics education.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Merle Spriggs (2010). Ashley's Interests Were Not Violated Because She Does Not Have the Necessary Interests. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):52-54.
    (2010). Ashley's Interests Were Not Violated Because She Does Not Have the Necessary Interests. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 52-54.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Merle Spriggs (2008). Is Pragmatism Just an Apology for Unrestrained Science? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):39 – 41.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Merle Spriggs (2008). The Ethics of Research on Less Expensive, Less Effective Interventions: A Case for Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):295-302.
    The Kennedy Krieger lead paint study is a landmark case in human experimentation and a classic case in research ethics. In this paper I use the lead paint study to assist in the analysis of the ethics of research on less expensive, less effective interventions. I critically evaluate an argument by Buchanan and Miller who defend both the Kennedy Krieger lead paint study and public health research on less expensive, less effective interventions. I conclude that Buchanan and Miller’s argument is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Merle Spriggs (2007). When "Risk" and "Benefit" Are Open to Interpretation - as is Generally the Case. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (3):17 – 19.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kara Woolley & Merle Spriggs (2007). Enhancing Children's Intelligence: Do the Means Matter Morally? Monash Bioethics Review 26 (1-2):79.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London (2006). Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Merle Spriggs (2006). Can Children Be Altruistic Research Subjects? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):49-50.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. M. Spriggs (2005). Hypoxic Air Machines: Performance Enhancement Through Effective Training--Or Cheating? Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):112-113.
    Following an investigation of the football clubs using hypoxic air machines, the Australian Football League has decided not to ban the machines. This seems, however, to be a reluctant decision since it appears that some AFL officials still feel there is something undesirable about the use of the machines. Use of the machines raises questions about performance enhancement and the role of technology. It prompts consideration of the grounds for banning performance enhancing devices or substances and raises questions about what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. M. Spriggs (2005). Is Conceiving a Child to Benefit Another Against the Interests of the New Child? Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (6):341-342.
    Conceiving a child by way of embryo selection and tissue matching to benefit a sick sibling is generally justified on the grounds that as well as the potential to save the sick child, there is a benefit for the new baby. The new baby is selected so he or she will not have the disease suffered by the first child. It is not possible, however, to select against conditions for which there is no test and Jamie Whitaker’s birth is a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Merle Spriggs (2005). Autonomy and Patients' Decisions. Lexington Books.
    By looking closely at the ideas of Rosseau, Kant, and Mill, Autonomy and Patients' Decisions traces the modern concept of autonomy from its historical roots, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. M. Spriggs (2004). Compulsory Brain Scans and Genetic Tests for Boxers--Or Should Boxing Be Banned? Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):515-516.
    Compulsory genetic tests which reveal a predisposition to brain damage could be of more use in preventing harm than brain scans which show that damage has already occurredAmid calls for a ban on boxing the Victorian government in Australia introduced compulsory brain scans for professional boxers in June 2001. Some people think the introduction of this new law is a “tough” measure. Others think the law is of limited value because the damage has already occurred by the time something shows (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. M. Spriggs (2004). Commodification of Children Again and Non-Disclosure Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Huntington's Disease. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):538-538.
    When is commodification acceptable?Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is usually restricted to couples who are eligible for in vitro fertilisation —infertile couples or those with a history of genetic disease. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority in England and the Infertility Treatment Authority in Australia have both given permission for PGD with tissue typing to detect human leucocyte antigen compatibility in order to save an existing sibling with a life threatening condition. The procedure has also been carried out in the United States.1Heavy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. M. Spriggs (2004). High Culture: Reflections on Addiction and Modernity. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):e11-e11.
    High Culture is a collection of essays containing reflections on addiction. Some of the essays are original and some are reprints. The volume is divided into two sections: the first dealing with literature, philosophy, and the arts and the second with sociology, psychology, and the media. The editors promise something different from the usual “insistent drive to medicalize, discipline, rehabilitate, and contain the subject of drugs within frameworks that disguise deeply rooted moral and religious fears, values and beliefs or prejudices” (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. M. Spriggs (2004). Woman Wants Dead Fiance's Baby: Who Owns a Dead Man's Sperm. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):384-388.
    The Brisbane Supreme Court has denied an Australian woman’s request to harvest and freeze her dead fiancé’s sperm for future impregnation. After she was denied access to the sperm, the woman learnt that her fiancé may have been a sperm donor and she began checking to find out if his sperm was still available. Given what we know, there is a good ethical argument that the woman should have access to the sperm and should be allowed to have her dead (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. M. Spriggs (2004). Canaries in the Mines: Children, Risk, Non-Therapeutic Research, and Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):176-181.
    The Kennedy Krieger lead paint study received a lot of attention after a US Court of Appeals ruled that a parent cannot consent to the participation of a child in non-therapeutic research. The ruling has raised fears that, if it goes unchallenged, valuable research might not proceed and ultimately all children would be harmed. The author discusses significant aspects of the study that have been neglected, and argues that the study was unethical because it involved injustice and its design meant (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. M. Spriggs (2003). IVF Mixup: White Couple Have Black Babies. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):65-65.
    A n IVF mixup has resulted in a white couple giving birth to black twins. Prior to DNA testing, no one can be sure whether the white woman’s eggs were fertilised with the black man’s sperm, or the black couple’s embryo was mistakenly implanted in the white woman. It is believed that Mr and Mrs A, the white couple, want to keep the babies and there is conjecture about Mr and Mrs B, the black couple, wanting them too.1 Under the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. M. Spriggs (2003). Should HIV Discordant Couples Have Access to Assisted Reproductive Technologies? Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):325-329.
    In this paper we identify and evaluate arguments for and against offering assisted reproductive technologies , specifically IVF, to HIV discordant couples . The idea of offering ART to HIV discordant couples generates concerns about safety and public health and raises questions such as: what is an acceptable level of risk to offspring and should couples who want this assistance be subject to selection criteria; should they undergo scrutiny about their suitability as parents when those who are able to conceive (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. M. Spriggs (2003). Therapeutic Cloning Research and Ethical Oversight. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):207-208.
    Cloning Trevor, a story about therapeutic cloning research, appeared in the June issue of The Atlantic Monthly. The story gives a human face to the people whom therapeutic cloning could benefit. It presents an argument for government funding and it puts the usual calls for a moratorium on embryonic stem cell research to allow for more debate, in a less favourable light. The story also highlights some problems with ethical oversight.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Merle Spriggs (2003). Can We Help Addicts Become More Autonomous? Inside the Mind of An Addict. Bioethics 17 (5-6):542-554.
  27. M. Spriggs (2002). Genetically Selected Baby Free of Inherited Predisposition to Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):290-290.
    Is it right to use pre-implantation genetic diagnosis to select an embryo free of the gene for early-onset Alzheimer’s disease?A 30 year old woman with the gene for early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, who seems certain to develop the disease by the time she is 40, has used IVF and preimplantation genetic diagnosis to select an embryo that is free of the mutant gene. The woman, a geneticist, has given birth to a mutation-free child. This marks the first time that preimplantation genetic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. M. Spriggs (2002). Lesbian Couple Create a Child Who is Deaf Like Them. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):283-283.
    A deaf lesbian couple who chose to have a deaf child receive a lot of criticismA deaf lesbian couple in the US deliberately tried to create a deaf child. Sharon Duchesneau and Candy McCullough hoped their child, conceived with the help of a sperm donor, would be deaf like the rest of the family. Their daughter, five year old Jehanne, is also deaf and was conceived with the same donor. News of the couple choosing to have a deaf child has (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. M. Spriggs (2002). Saviour Siblings. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):289-289.
    In Victoria, Australia, some parents are now able to select embryos free from genetic disease which will provide stem cells to treat an existing siblingA n Australian couple from Victoria have been given permission to use in vitro fertilisation technology to screen an embryo in order to “create a `perfect match’ sibling” for their seriously ill child. In vitro fertilisation is regulated in Victoria by the Infertility Treatment Authority which restricts access to people who are medically infertile or who have (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. M. Spriggs (2002). The Perruche Judgment and the "Right Not to Be Born". Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):63-64.
    Overruling of law said to establish the “right not to be born”The French government has given in to public pressure and overturned a controversial legal ruling which recognised the right of a disabled chld to seek damaages. Most notably, the ruling, widely described as establishing a child's right “not to be born”, had provoked “outrage” amongst groups defending the rights of the disabled and led to a ban on prenatal scans by French gynaecologists. Once again, only parents will be able (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ronald A. Carson, Chester R. Burns & Merle Spriggs (2000). Book Reviews-Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics: A Twenty-Year Retrospective and Critical Appraisal. Bioethics-Oxford 14 (2):175-177.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. M. Spriggs (1998). Autonomy in the Face of a Devastating Diagnosis. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):123-126.
    Literary accounts of traumatic events can be more informative and insightful than personal testimonials. In particular, reference to works of literature can give us a more vivid sense of what it is like to receive a devastating diagnosis. In turn this can lead us to question some common assumptions about the nature of autonomy, particularly for patients in these circumstances. The literature of concentration camp and labour camp experiences can help us understand what it is like to have one's life-plans (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. M. Spriggs (1998). Informative Paternalism: Studies in the Ethics of Promoting and Predicting Health by Nina Nikku. Bioethics-Oxford- 12:259-259.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation