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  1. Dorothy Nelkin & M. Susan Lindee (1998). Cloning in the Popular Imagination. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):145-149.
    Dolly is a lamb that was cloned by Dr. Ian Wilmut, a Scottish embryologist. But she is also a Rorschach test. The public response to the production of a lamb by cloning a cultured cell line reflects the futuristic fantasies and Frankenstein fears that have more broadly surrounded research in genetics and especially genetic engineering. Cloning was a term originally applied to a botanical technique of asexual reproduction. But following early experiments in the manipulation of the hereditary and reproductive process (...)
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  2. Jonathan Harwood, M. Susan Lindee, David Magnus, Angela Creager, Mark V. Barrow Jr & Myles W. Jackson (1995). The J. H. B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 28 (1):167-179.
  3. M. Susan Lindee (1992). What Is a Mutation? Identifying Heritable Change in the Offspring of Survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (2):231 - 255.
  4. William C. Summers, Joel B. Hagen, Mark V. Barrow Jr, Lynn Nyhart & M. Susan Lindee (1992). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (2):335-342.
  5. Paula Findlen, Anne Harrington, Dorothy Porter, M. Susan Lindee & Pnina G. Abir-Am (1991). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 24 (3):537-548.
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