Search results for 'M. Tom' (try it on Scholar)

123 found
Sort by:
  1. W. M., Édouard Driault, Michel Lhéritier, Edouard Driault & Michel Lheritier (1926). Histoire diplomatique de la Grèce de 1821 à nos joursΣύγχρονος Ἱστορία τω̑ν Ἑλλήνων καὶ τω̑ν λοιπω̑ν λαω̑ν τη̑ς Ἀνατολη̑ς ἀπὸ 1821 μέχρι 1921. 'Υπὸ Π. Καραλίδου. Τόμ. i-v. [1821-62]Histoire diplomatique de la Grece de 1821 a nos joursSugxronos Istoria twn Ellhnwn kai twn loipwn lawn ths Anatolhs apo 1821 mexri 1921. 'Upo P. Karalidou. Tom. i-v. [1821-62]. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 46:132.score: 360.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2001). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.score: 240.0
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes (...)of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A set of QEEG measures were found which reversibly displayed high heterogeneity of variance between four states as follows: (1) during induction; (2) just after loss of consciousness (LOC); (3) just before return of consciousness (ROC); (4) just after ROC. Homogeneity of variance across all agents within states was found. Topographic statistical probability images were compared between states. At LOC, power increased in all frequency bands in the power spectrum with the exception of a decrease in gamma activity, and there was a marked anteriorization of power. Additionally, a significant change occurred in hemispheric relationships, with prefrontal and frontal regions of each hemisphere becoming more closely coupled, and anterior and posterior regions on each hemisphere, as well as homologous regions between the two hemispheres, uncoupling. All of these changes reversed upon ROC. Variable resolution electromagnetic tomography (VARETA) was performed to localize salient features of power anteriorization in three dimensions. A common set of neuroanatomical regions appeared to be the locus of the most probable generators of the observed EEG changes. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2002). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics - Volume 10, Number 2 (2001), Pages 165-183. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):138-138.score: 240.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Hugh Lloyd-Jones (1986). The Revised Teubner Sophocles R. D. Dawe: Sophoclis Tragoediae, Tom. I2: AiaxElectraOedipus Rex. Pp. Xiv+164. Leipzig: Teubner, 1984. 39 M. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (01):10-12.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Luuk Matthijssen (2003). Tom M. Van Engers, Knowledge Management: The Role of Mental Models in Business Systems Design. Ph.D. Thesis, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Belastingdienst (Dutch Tax and cusToms Administration). [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 11 (1):63-67.score: 120.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Neil Cooper (1994). Logic, Facts and Representation: An Examination of R. M. Hare's Moral Philosoph By Tom Rønnow-Rasmussen. Lund University Press. 1993 248 Pp., SEK 205. [REVIEW] Philosophy 69 (267):112-.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. A. E. Douglas (1983). Three of Cicero's Philosophical Works Esther Bréguet: Cicéron, La République, Tom. 1: Livre I; Tom. 2: Livres IIIV. (Collection Budé.) Pp. 277 (193247 Double); 209 (7120 Double). Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1980. Konrat Ziegler: M. Tullius Cicero, De Legibus. 3. Auflage Überarbeitet Und Durch Nachträge Ergänzt von Woldemar Görler. (Heidelberger Texte, Lateinische Reihe, 20.) Pp. 171. Freiberg/Würzburg: Verlag Ploetz, 1979. Paper. Julio Pimental Alvarez: Marco Tulio Cicerón, Disputas Tusculanas, Vol. 1: Libros III; Vol. 2: Libros IIIIV. (Bibliotheca Scriptorum Et Romanorum Mexicana.) Pp. Ccxxi + 87 (Double); Cxxxv + 130 (Double). Ciudad Universitaria México: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, 1979. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (02):213-215.score: 120.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. G. C. Richards (1942). More Letters of Erasmus Opus Epistolarum D. Erasmi Roterodami. Tom. X. Ediderunt H. M. Allen Et H. W. Garrod. Pp. Xxiv+440; 2 Plates. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1941. Cloth, 28s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):89-90.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Stephen Bann (1990). Reviews : Louis Marin, Portrait of the King, Trans. Martha M. Houle, Foreword by Tom Conley, London: Macmillan, 1988, £29.50, 290 Pp. Wendy Steiner, Pictures of Romance: Form Against Context in Painting and Literature, London: University of Chicago Press, 1988, £22.50, 218 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 3 (2):301-305.score: 120.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Paul Kerlinger (1989). Falcon Fortunes Peregrine Falcon Populations: Their Management and Recovery Tom J. Cade James H. Enderson Carl G. Thelander Clayton M. White. [REVIEW] Bioscience 39 (11):812-813.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Luuk Matthijssen (2003). Tom M. van Engers,. Ph. D. Thesis, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Belastingdienst (Dutch Tax and Customs Administration). [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 11 (1):63-67.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Luuk Reviewer-Matthijssen (2003). Review of Knowledge Management: The Role of Mental Models in Business Systems Design by Tom M. van Engers Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Belasting-Dienst, Apeldoorn 2001. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 11 (1):63-67.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. G. C. Richards (1938). Opus Epistolarum Des. Erastni Roterodami. Tom. IX Ediderunt H. M. Allen Et H. W. Garrod. Pp. Xxiv + 497; 2 Plates, 1 Woodcut. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1938. Clot 28s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (05):201-.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. G. C. Richards (1926). Opus Epistolarum Des. Erasmi Roterodami. Denuo Recognitum Et Auctum Per P. S. Allen, M.A., Et H. M. Allen. Tom. V., 15221524. Pp. Xxiii + 631; with 4 Plates. Oxonii: In Typographeo Clarendoniano, 1924. 28s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (01):38-39.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. W. Rhys Roberts (1911). Allen's Erasmi Epistolae, Vol. II Opus Epistolarum Des. Erasmi Roterodami Denuo Recognitum Et Auctum Per P. S. Allen, M.A., Collegii Mertonensis Socium. Tom. II. Oxonii in Typographeo Clarendoniano. MCMX. Pp. Xx + 608. 18s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 25 (04):118-120.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. W. Rhys Roberts (1907). Erasmus Opus Epistolarum Des. Erasmi Roterodami Denuo Recognitum Et Auctum Per P. S. Allen, M.A., E Coll. Corporis Christi. Tom. I. 14841514. 9½×5¾. Pp. Xxiv + 616. Oxonii in Typographeo Clarendoniano. Mcmvi. I8s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (04):108-113.score: 120.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Francesca M. Bosco, Livia Colle, Silvia De Fazio, Adele Bono, Saverio Ruberti & Maurizio Tirassa (2009). Th.O.M.A.S.: An Exploratory Assessment of Theory of Mind in Schizophrenic Subjects. Cogprints 18 (1):306-319.score: 60.0
    A large body of literature agrees that persons with schizophrenia suffer from a Theory of Mind <span class='Hi'>span>(ToM)<span class='Hi'>span> deficit.<span class='Hi'>span> (...)span> most empirical studies have focused on third-person,<span class='Hi'>span> egocentric ToM,<span class='Hi'>span> underestimating other facets of this complex cognitive skill.<span class='Hi'>span> Aim of this research is to examine the ToM of schizophrenic persons considering its various aspects <span class='Hi'>span>(first vs.<span class='Hi'>span> second order,<span class='Hi'>span> first vs.<span class='Hi'>span> third person,<span class='Hi'>span> egocentric vs.<span class='Hi'>span> allocentric,<span class='Hi'>span> beliefs vs.<span class='Hi'>span> desires vs.<span class='Hi'>span> positive emotions vs.<span class='Hi'>span> negative emotions and how each of these mental state types may be dealt with)<span class='Hi'>span>, to determine whether some components are more impaired than others.<span class='Hi'>span> We developed a Theory of Mind Assessment Scale <span class='Hi'>span>(Th.o.m.a.s.<span class='Hi'>span>) and administered it to 22 persons with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia and a matching control group.<span class='Hi'>span> Th.o.m.a.s.<span class='Hi'>span> is a semi-structured interview which allows a multi-component measurement of ToM.<span class='Hi'>span> Both groups were also administered a few existing ToM tasks and the schizophrenic subjects were administered the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale and the WAIS-R.<span class='Hi'>span> The schizophrenic persons performed worse than control at all the ToM measurements;<span class='Hi'>span> however,<span class='Hi'>span> these deficits appeared to be differently distributed among different components of ToM.<span class='Hi'>span> Our conclusion is that ToM deficits are not unitary in schizophrenia,<span class='Hi'>span> which also testifies to the importance of a complete and articulated investigation of ToM. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Mikel Torres Aldave (2009). Capacidades y derechos de los animales: argumentos a favor de la teoría de M.C. Nussbaum. Dilemata 1 (1).score: 54.0
    Many publications in the field of animal ethics consider the theories of Peter Singer and Tom Regan as the main arguments for the direct moral consideration of (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. William Wernick (1967). Review: Ralph M. Toms, Systems of Boolean Equations. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (1):132-133.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Patricia M. Matthews (1997). Feeling and Aesthetic Judgment: A Rejoinder to Tom Huhn. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (1):58-60.score: 36.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Tom Koch (1998). On the Subject(s) of Jack Kevorkian, M.D.: A Retrospective Analysis. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):436-441.score: 36.0
    To those defining euthanasia as a battle for the principle of self-determination, persons seeking physician assisted death (PAD) are soldiers in the fight for patient autonomy. (...)The reasons they seek it, or the potential of other, non-life-threatening interventions is less important than this principle: individuals have the right not only to choose death (suicide), but to be assisted in dying. They should not be second guessed or denied on the basis of another's distaste for that decision. This paper offers a general review of deaths attributed to Dr. Jack Kevorkian's PAD practice in an attempt to answer two questions: Why do persons seek physician assisted death, and, to what extent does induced death seem, in retrospect, a reasonable and perhaps necessary medical response to specific patient complaints? (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Tom Huhn (1997). A Lack of Feeling in Kant: Response to Patricia M. Matthews. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (1):57-58.score: 36.0
  23. Tom Sorell (1999). The Cambridge History of the 17th Century Philosophy by D. Garber and M. Ayers (Eds). Cambridge University Press, 1998, 2 Volumes, Pp. XVII + 1616, £90.00 or $175. [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (3):446-460.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. M. M. W. (1939). Book Review:Who Was Socrates? Alban D. Winspear, Tom Silverberg. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 6 (3):380-.score: 36.0
  25. Tom Stevenson (2000). STATUES OF STATUS M. Sehlmeyer: Stadtrömische Ehrenstatuen der republikanischen Zeit. Historizität und Kontext von Symbolen nobilitären Standesbewusstseins . ( Historia Einzelschrift 130.) Pp. 319, 20 b & w ills, 3 plans. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1999. Paper, DM 124. ISBN: 3-515-07479-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):563-.score: 36.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. D. M. Jones (1955). Pentti Aalto: Studien zur Geschichte des Infinitivs im Griechischen. (Annales Academiae Scientiarum Fennicae, Ser. B, Tom. 80, 2.) Pp. 116. Helsinki: Academy, 1953. Paper, 400 mk. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (02):205-206.score: 36.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. D. M. Jones (1951). The Gerund and Gerundive Pentti Aalto: Untersuchungen über das lateinische Gerundium und Gerundivum. (Annales Academiae Scientiarum Fennicae, Ser. B, Tom. 62. 3.) Pp. 193. Helsinki: Druckerei-A. G. der Finnischen Literaturgesellschaft, 1949. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (3-4):201-202.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.score: 36.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Tom Cochrane (2013). Costelloe, Timothy M., Ed. The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press, 2012, Xiii + 304 Pp., 36 B&W Illus., $35.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):390-392.score: 36.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Tom Hillard (2007). Yarrow (L.M.) Historiography at the End of the Republic. Provincial Perspectives on Roman Rule. Pp. Xiv + 396. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-19-927754-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02).score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. M. N. Tod (1907). De Institutis Reipublicae Atheniensium Post Aristotelis Aetatem Commutatis I. By Johs Sundwall. (Acta Societatis Scientiarum Fennicae, Tom, Xxxiv, No. 4.) Helsingfors : Ex Officina Typographica Societatis Litterariae Fennicae. 1906. 11½″ × 9″. Pp.26. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (07):213-214.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. M. Anderson (2001). Celebrating Semiotic's Pioneer, Pathfinder, Mentor, Midwife, Pied Piper, King Midas, Gold Standard, Magician, Troubador, Trickster, Friend," Tom". American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):319-331.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Tom Armentano (1989). Quantifying Ecology Wetland Modelling W. J. Mitsch M. Strǎskraba S. E. Jørgensen. Bioscience 39 (3):203-204.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. V. M. Bader & Albert Benschop (1990). Principiële beperkingen en paternalisme? een kritische reactie bij de opmerkingen van Tom Korver en Luuk Wijmans bij'Ongelijk-heden'. Krisis: Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 40:34-38.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Tom Bailey (2008). Span Xmlns: Xlink=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1999/Xlink" Xmlns: Mml=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1998/Math/MathML" Xmlns: M=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1998/Math/MathML" Style=" Font-Style: Italic;"> Congedarsi da Kant?: Span Xmlns: Xlink=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1999/Xlink" Xmlns: Mml=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1998/Math/MathML" Xmlns: M=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1998/Math/MathML" Style=" Font-Style: Italic;"> Interventi Sul Goodbye Kant Span Xmlns: Xlink=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1999/Xlink" Xmlns: Mml=" Http://Www. W3. Org/1998/Math ... [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):328.score: 36.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Tom S. Cooperrider (1971). Texas Plants Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas D. S. Correll M. C. Johnston. Bioscience 21 (12):589-589.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. J. D. M. Ford, W. A. Nitze, F. N. Robinson & Archer Taylor (1952). Memoir of Tom Peete Cross. Speculum 27 (3):447.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Tom Hall (1997). Ethnography: Principles in Practice. By M. Hammersley & P. Atkinson. Pp. 323. (Routledge, London, 1995.). Journal of Biosocial Science 29 (1):119-128.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. M. Kolkman (2007). Tom Rockmore and Daniel Breazeale, Eds., Rights, Bodies and Recognition: New Essays on Fichte's. Philosophy in Review 27 (5):373.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. M. Ryle (forthcoming). Tom Digby, Ed., Men Doing Feminism. Radical Philosophy.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. M. Ryle (forthcoming). Tom Steele, The Emergence of Cultural Studies 1945-1965. Radical Philosophy.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Tom Shakespeare (1992). Constructing Deafness. Edited by Gregory Susan & Gillian M. Hartley. Pp. 319. (Pinter, and the Open University, 1991.) £35.00 (Hardback); £12.50 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (4):565-566.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.) (2005). Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Philosophy written in English is overwhelmingly <span class='Hi'>analyticspan> philosophy, and the techniques and predilections of <span class='Hi'>analyticspan> philosophy are not only unhistorical but (...)span> usually aspires to a very high degree of clarity and precision of formulation and argument, and it often seeks to be informed by, and consistent with, current natural science. In an earlier era, <span class='Hi'>analyticspan> philosophy aimed at agreement with ordinary linguistic intuitions or common sense beliefs, or both. All of these aspects of the subject sit uneasily with the use of historical texts for philosophical illumination. In this book, ten distinguished philosophers explore the tensions between, and the possibilities of reconciling, <span class='Hi'>analyticspan> philosophy and history of philosophy. Contributors: M. R. Ayers, John Cottingham, Daniel Garber, Gary Hatfield, Anthony Kenny, Steven Nadler, G. A. J. Rogers, Tom Sorell, Catherine Wilson, Yves Charles Zarka. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Nhung T. Nguyen, M. Tom Basuray, William P. Smith, Donald Kopka & Donald McCulloh (2008). Moral Issues and Gender Differences in Ethical Judgment Using Reidenbach and Robin's (1990) Multidimensional Ethics Scale: Implications in Teaching of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):417 - 430.score: 30.0
    In this study, we examined moral issues and gender differences in ethical judgment using Reidenbach and Robins [Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1990) 639) multidimensional ethics (...)scale (MES). A total of 340 undergraduate students were asked to provide ethical judgment by rating three moral issues in the MES labeled: ‚sales’, ‚auto’, andretailusing three ethics theories: moral equity, relativism, and contractualism. We found that female studentsratings of ethical judgment were consistently higher than that of male students across two out of three moral issues examined (i.e., sales and retails) and ethics theories; providing support for Eaglys [1987, Sex Differences in Social Behavior: A Social-role Interpretation. (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc, Hillsdale, NJ, England)] social role theory. After controlling for moral issues, womens higher ratings of ethical judgment over mens became statistically non-significant. Theoretical and practical implications based on the studys findings are provided. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. T. Nguyen Nhung, William M. Tom Basuray, Donald Kopka P. Smith & Donald McCulloh (2008). Moral Issues and Gender Differences in Ethical Judgment Using Reidenbach and Robin's (1990) Multidimensional Ethics Scale: Implications in Teaching of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4).score: 30.0
    In this study, we examined moral issues and gender differences in ethical judgment using Reidenbach and Robins [ Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1990) 639) multidimensional ethics (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Nhung T. Nguyen, M. Tom Basuray, Donald Kopka & Donald McCulloh (2012). Moral Awareness in Business Ethics Education. Journal of Business Ethics Education 9:79-100.score: 30.0
    In this study, a U.S. Mid-Atlantic universitys business ethics education program was assessed as part of the assurance of learning assessment using a sample of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Tom Lindstrøm (2008). Nonlinear Stochastic Integrals for Hyperfinite Lévy Processes. Logic and Analysis 1 (2):91-129.score: 30.0
    I develop a notion of nonlinear stochastic integrals for hyperfinite Lévy processes and use it to find exact formulas for expressions which are intuitively of the form (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide for: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 24.0
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxyat least within analytic aesthetics broadly construedto hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art (...)and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has a distinguished philosophical history but as the Compass survey article suggests ('Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value.' Philosophy Compass 1.2 (2006): 12943), it is only very recently that figures in the field have returned to it to develop more precisely what they take the relationships to be and why. Consensus is, unsurprisingly, lacking. The reinvigoration of the issues has led sophisticated formalists or autonomists to mount a more considered defence of the idea that aesthetic and literary values are indeed conceptually distinct from the justification or otherwise of the moral perspective or views endorsed in a work (Topic I). The challenges presented by such a defence are many but amongst them are appeals to critical practice (Lamarque and Olsen), scepticism about whether or not art really can give us bona fide knowledge (Stolnitz) and the recognition that truth often seems to be far removed from what it is we value in our appreciation of works (Lamarque). One way to motivate consideration of the relevance of a work's moral character to its artistic value concerns the phenomena of imaginative resistance. At least sometimes it would seem that, as Hume originally suggested, we either cannot or will not enter imaginatively into the perspective solicited by a work due to its morally problematic character (Topic II). In some cases, it would seem that as a matter of psychological fact, we cannot do so since it is impossible for us to imagine how it could be that a certain attitude or action is morally permissible or good (Walton). The question then is whether or not this is a function of morality in particular or constraints on imaginative possibility more generally and what else is involved. At other times, the phenomena seem to be driven by a moral reluctance to allow ourselves to enter into the dramatic perspective involved (Moran) or evaluation of the attitude expressed (Stokes). Nonetheless, it is far from obvious that this is so of all the attitudes or responses we judge to be morally problematic. After all, it looks like we can and indeed often do suspend or background particular cognitive and moral commitments in engaging with all sorts of works (Nichols and Weinberg). If the moral character of a work interacts with how we appreciate and evaluate them, then the pressing question is this: is there any systematic account of the relationship available to us? One way is to consider the relationship between our emotional responses to works and their moral character (Topic III). After all, art works often solicit various emotional responses from us to follow the work and make use of moral concepts in so doing (Carroll). Indeed, whether or not a work merits the sought for emotional responses often seems to be internally related to ethical considerations (Gaut). Yet, it is not obvious that we should apply our moral concepts or respond emotionally in our imaginative engagement with works as art as we should in real life (Kieran, Jacobson). A different route is via the thought that art can convey knowledge (Topic IV). There might be particular kinds of moral knowledge art distinctively suited to conveying (Nussbaum) or it may just be that art does so particularly effectively (Carroll, Gaut, Kieran). Either way where this can be tied to the artistic means and appreciation of a work it would seem that to cultivate moral understanding contributes to the value of a work and to betray misunderstanding is a defect. Without denying the relevance of the moral character of a work some authors have wanted to claim that sometimes the immoral aspect of a work can contribute to rather than lessen its artistic value (Topic V). One route is to claim that there is no systematic theoretical account of the relationship available and what the right thing to say is depends on the particular case involved (Jacobson). Another involves the claim that this is so when the defect connects up in an appropriate way to one of the values of art. Thus, it has been claimed, only where a work reveals something which adds to intelligibility, knowledge or understanding in virtue of its morally problematic aspect can this be so (Kieran). The latter position looks like it could in principle be held whilst nonetheless maintaining that the typical or standard relationship is as the moralists would have it. Yet perhaps allowing valence change for such reasons is less a mark of principled explanation and more a function of downright inconsistency or incoherence (Harold). The topics themselves and suggested readings given below follow the structure articulated above as further amplified in the Compass survey article. The design and structure given below can be easily compressed or expanded further. Author Recommends 1. Carroll, Noël. 'Art, Narrative and Moral Understanding.' Aesthetics and Ethics: Essay at the Intersection . Ed. Jerrold Levinson. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. 12660. This article develops the idea that engaging with narrative art calls on moral concepts and emotions and can thereby clarify our moral understanding. 2. Carroll, Noël. Beyond Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays . Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2009. Part IV consists of six distinct essays on questions concerning the inter-relations between art and morality including the essay cited above and the author's articulation and defence of moderate moralism. 3. Gaut, Berys. 'The Ethical Criticism of Art.' Aesthetics and Ethics: Essay at the Intersection . Ed. Jerrold Levinson. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. 182203. 4. Gaut, Berys. Art, Emotion and Ethics . Oxford: Oxford UP, 2007. This monograph provides the most exhaustive treatment of the issues and defends the claim that, where relevant, whenever a work is morally flawed it is of lesser value as art and wherever it is morally virtuous the work's value as art is enhanced. Chapters 7 and 8 defend concern ethical knowledge and chapter 10 is a development of the article cited above concerning emotional responses. Chapter 3 also gives a useful conceptual map of the issues and options in the debate. 5. Jacobson, Daniel. 'In Praise of Immoral Art.' Philosophical Topics 25 (1997): 15599. A wide ranging and extended treatment of relevant issues which objects to generalising moral treatments of our responses to art works and defends the idea that particular works can be better because of rather than despite their moral defects. 6. Kieran, Matthew. 'Forbidden Knowledge: The Challenge of Cognitive Immoralism.' Art and Morality . Ed. Sebastian Gardner and José Luis Bermúdez. London: Routledge, 2003. 5673. A general argument for immoralism is elaborated by outlining when, where and why a work's morally problematic character can contribute to its artistic value for principled reasons (through enhancing moral understanding). 7. Kieran, Matthew. Revealing Art . London: Routledge, 2005. Chapter 4. This chapter argues against both aestheticism and straightforward moralism about art, elaborating a defence of immoralism in relation to visual art whilst ranging over issues from pornographic art to the nature and demands of different genres in art. 8. Lamarque, Peter. 'Cognitive Values in the Arts: Marking the Boundaries.' Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Ed. Matthew Kieran. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006, 12739. This article concisely outlines and defends a sophisticated aestheticism that denies the importance of truth to artistic value. 9. Stolnitz, Jerome. 'On the Cognitive Triviality of Art.' British Journal of Aesthetics 32.3 (1992): 191200. This article articulates and defends the claim that no knowledge of any interesting or significant kind can be afforded by works appreciated and evaluated as art. 10. Walton, Kendall. 'Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality, I.' Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Suppl. 68 (1994): 2751. This article builds on some comments from Hume to develop the idea that when engaging with fictions it seems impossible imaginatively to enter into radically deviant moral attitudes. Online Materials 'Aesthetics and Ethics: The State of the Art.' American Society of Aesthetics online (Jeffrey Dean): http://www.aesthetics-online.org/articles/index.php?articles_id=15 >. 'Art, Censorship and Morality' downloadable podcast of Nigel Warburton interviewing Matthew Kieran at Tate Britain (BBC/OU Open2.net as part of the Ethics Bites series): http://www.open2.net/ethicsbites/art-censorship-morality.html >. 'Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value.' Philosophy Compass 1.2 (2006): 12943 (Matthew Kieran): http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118557779/abstract >. 'Ethical Criticism of Art.' Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Ella Peek): http://www.iep.utm.edu/a/art-eth.htm >. 'Fascinating Fascism.' New York Review of Books Piece Discussing Leni Riefenstahl (Susan Sontag): http://www.nybooks.com/articles/9280 >. 'The Beheading of St. John the Baptist (1450s), Giovanni de Paolo' (Tom Lubbock): http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/great-works/great-works-the-beheading-of-st-john-the-baptist-1450s-giovanni-di-paolo-1684900.html >. Vladimir Nabokov and Lionel Trilling discuss Lolita (CBS): http://www.listal.com/video/3848698 >. Sample Syllabus Topic I Autonomism/AestheticismAnderson, James C. and Jeffrey T. Dean. 'Moderate Autonomism.' British Journal of Aesthetics 38.2 (1998): 15066. • Beardsley, Monroe. Aesthetics: Problems in the Philosophy of Criticism . New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1958. Chapter 12. • Kant, Immanuel. The Critique of Judgement.Trans. James Creed Meredith . Oxford: Oxford UP, 1952 [1790]. • Lamarque, Peter. 'Cognitive Values in the Arts: Marking the Boundaries.' Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art . Ed. Matthew Kieran. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006, 12739. • ——. 'Tragedy and Moral Value.' Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73.2 (1995): 23949. • Lamarque, Peter and Stein Olsen. Truth, Fiction and Literature . Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994. Chapter 10. • Stolnitz, Jerome. 'On the Cognitive Triviality of Art.' British Journal of Aesthetics 32.3 (1992): 191200. Topic II Imaginative Capacities, Intelligibility and ResistanceMoran, Richard. 'The Expression of Feeling in Imagination.' Philosophical Review 103.1 (1994): 75106. • Nichols, Shaun. 'Just the Imagination: Why Imagining Doesn't Behave Like Believing'. Mind & Language 21.4 (2006): 45974. • Stokes, Dustin. 'The Evaluative Character of Imaginative Resistance'. British Journal of Aesthetics 46.4 (2006): 387405. • Tanner, Michael. 'Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality, II'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Suppl. Vol. 68 (1994): 5166. • Walton, Kendall (1994). 'Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality, I'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Suppl. Vol. 68 (1994): 2751. • Weinberg, Jonathan. 'Configuring the Cognitive Imagination.' New Waves in Aesthetics . Eds. K. Stock and K. Thomson-Jones. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. 20323. Topic III Moralism and EmotionsCarroll, Noël. 'Moderate Moralism.' British Journal of Aesthetics 36.3 (1996): 22337. • Carroll, Noël. 'Art, Narrative and Moral Understanding.' Aesthetics and Ethics: Essay at the Intersection . Ed. Jerrold Levinson. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998.12660. • Gaut, Berys. Art, Emotion and Ethics . Oxford: Oxford UP, 2007. Chapter 10. • ——. 'The Ethical Criticism of Art.' Aesthetics and Ethics: Essay at the Intersection . Ed. Jerrold Levinson. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. 182203. • Hume, David. 'Of the Standard of Taste.' Selected Essays . Oxford: Oxford UP, 1993 [1757]. 13353. • Kieran, Matthew. 'Emotions, Art and Immorality.' Oxford Handbook to the Philosophy of Emotions . Ed. Peter Goldie. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2009. 681703. • Tolstoy, Leo. What is Art? . London: Penguin, 2004. Chapters 5 and 15. Topic IV Moralism and KnowledgeAristotle. Poetics . Trans. M. Heath. London: Penguin, 1996 [367322 BC]. • Carroll, Noël. 'The Wheel of Virtue: Art, Literature and Moral Knowledge.' Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60.1 (2002): 326. • Gaut, Berys. Art, Emotion and Ethics . Oxford: Oxford UP, 2007. Chapters 7 and 8. • Gaut, Berys. 'Art and Cognition.' Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art . Ed. Matthew Kieran. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006. 11526. • Kieran, Matthew. 'Art, Imagination and the Cultivation of Morals.' Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54.4 (1996): 33751. • Nussbaum, Martha. 'Finely Aware and Richly Responsible: Literature and the Moral Imagination.' Love's Knowledge . New York: Oxford UP, 1990. 14868. • Plato. The Republic . Trans. D. Lee. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974. Book 10. Topic V Immoralist ContextualismHarold, James. 'Immoralism and the Valence Constraint.' British Journal of Aesthetics 48.1 (2008): 4564. • Jacobson, Daniel. 'In Praise of Immoral Art.' Philosophical Topics 25 (1997): 15599. • ——. 'Ethical Criticism and the Vices of Moderation.' Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art . Ed. Matthew Kieran. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006. 34255. • John, Eileen. 'Artistic Value and Moral Opportunism.' Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art . Ed. Matthew Kieran. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006. 33141. • Kieran, Matthew. 'Forbidden Knowledge:The Challenge of Cognitive Immoralism.' Art and Morality . Ed. Sebastian Gardner and José Luis Bermúdez. London: Routledge, 2003. 5673. • Kieran, Matthew. Revealing Art . London: Routledge, 2005. Chapter 4. • Patridge, Stephanie. 'Moral Vices as Artistic Virtues: Eugene Onegin and Alice.' Philosophia 36.2 (2008): 18193. Focus Questions 1. What is the strongest argument for the claim that the moral character of a work is not relevant to its artistic value? Does artistic or literary criticism tend to concern itself with the truth or morality of works? If so, in what ways? If not, why do you think this is? 2. What different explanations might there be for difficulty with or resistance to imaginatively entering into attitudes you take to be immoral? How might this relate to the way our imaginings work as contrasted with belief? How might different literary or artistic treatments of the same subject matter make a difference? 3. How do narrative works draw on our moral concepts and responses? Can we suspend our normal moral commitments or application of moral concepts in responding emotionally to art works? Should we respond emotionally to art works as we ought to respond to real world events we witness? Why? Why not? 4. How, if at all, do art works convey moral understanding? How, if at all, is this related to the kinds of moral knowledge art works can teach or reveal to us? When, where and why might this be tied to the artistic value of a work? How can we tell where a work enhances our moral understanding as opposed to misleading or distorting it? 5. What art works do you value overall as art which commend or endorse moral values and attitudes that you do not? Is appreciation of them always marred or lessened by the morally dubious aspect? If not, what explains the differences in evaluation? What, if anything, might you learn by engaging with works which endorse moral attitudes or apply moral concepts different from those you take to be justified? How, if at all, might this connect up with what makes them valuable as art? (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 123