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Marguerite la Caze [26]M. la Caze [2]M. M. La Caze [2]
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Profile: Marguerite la Caze (University of Queensland)
  1. Marguerite La Caze (2014). Promising and Forgiveness. In Patrick Hayden (ed.), Hannah Arendt: Key Concepts. Acumen. 209-21.
     
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  2. Marguerite La Caze (2013). At First Blush: The Politics of Guilt and Shame. Parrhesia (18):85-99.
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  3. Marguerite La Caze (2013). Hope and Affirmation: An Ethics of Reciprocity. In Steven Churchill Jack Reynolds (ed.), Sartre: Key Concepts. Acumen. 206-12.
     
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  4. Marguerite La Caze (2013). The Mute Foundation of Aesthetic Experience? Culture, Theory, and Critique 54 (2):209-224.
     
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  5. Marguerite La Caze (2013). Wonder and Generosity: Their Role in Ethics and Politics. State University of New York.
    Wonder and generosity -- Love and respect -- Responding to difference and similarity -- The relation between ethics and politics -- Cosmopolitanism, hospitality and refugees -- Wonder, radical evil and forgiveness -- Apology, forgiveness, and reconciliation.
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  6. Marguerite La Caze (2012). Moss, Fungus, Cauliflower. Symposium 16 (1):30-51.
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  7. M. la Caze (2011). Terrorism and Trauma: Negotiating Derridean 'Autoimmunity'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (5):605-619.
    I begin by examining the logic of autoimmunity as characterized by Jacques Derrida, ‘that strange behaviour where a living being, in quasi-suicidal fashion, ‘‘itself’’ works to destroy its own protection, to immunize itself against its own immunity’ (Borradori, 2003: 94). According to Derrida, religion, democracy, terrorism and recent responses to the trauma of terrorism can be understood in terms of this logic. Responses to terrorism are ‘autoimmune’ and increase the trauma of terrorism as well as risking democratic values. I argue (...)
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  8. Marguerite La Caze (2011). A Taste for Fashion. In Jessica Wolfendale & Jeanette Kennett (eds.), Fashion – Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking with Style. Blackwell.
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  9. Marguerite La Caze (2011). Dancing with Iris. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 37 (4):697-704.
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  10. Marguerite La Caze & Henry Martyn Lloyd (2011). Editors' Introduction: Philosophy and Affective Turn. Parrhesia 13:1-13.
    This special issue of Parrhesia has developed from the 2010 Australasian Society for Continental Philosophy’s Conference at the University of Queensland on the theme of the philosophy of affect.
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  11. Marguerite la Caze (2009). Derrida: Opposing Death Penalties. Derrida Today 2 (2):186-199.
    Derrida's purpose in ‘Death Penalties’ (2004), is to show how both arguments in favour of capital punishment, exemplified by Kant's, and arguments for its abolition, such as those of Beccaria, are deconstructible. He claims that ‘never, to my knowledge, has any philosopher as a philosopher, in his or her own strictly and systematically philosophical discourse, never has any philosophy as such contested the legitimacy of the death penalty.’ (2004, 146) Derrida also asks how it is possible ‘to abolish the death (...)
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  12. Marguerite La Caze (2009). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. 2nd Ed. By Michèle le Dœuff. Translated by Trista Selous. [REVIEW] Hypatia 24 (1):191-195.
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  13. Marguerite La Caze (2009). Max Deutscher's Genre of Philosophy. Crossroads (1):71-78.
     
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  14. Marguerite La Caze (2008). Michele le Doeuff Feminist Epistemology and the Unthought. Hecate 34 (2):62-79..
     
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  15. Marguerite la Caze (2008). Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others’ experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people’s greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young’s articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  16. Marguerite la Caze (2007). At the Intersection: Kant, Derrida, and the Relations Between Ethics and Politics. Political Theory 35 (5):781-805.
    To elucidate the tensions in the relation between ethics and politics, I construct a dialogue between Kant, who argues that they can be made compatible, and Derrida, who claims to go beyond Kant and his idea of duty. For Derrida, ethics makes unconditional demands and politics guides our responses to possible effects of our decisions. Derrida argues that in politics there must be a negotiation of the non-negotiable call of ethical responsibility. I argue that Derrida's unconditional ethics cannot be read (...)
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  17. Marguerite la Caze (2007). On Orientation in Thought. International Studies in Philosophy 39 (4):77-102.
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  18. Marguerite La Caze (2007). Review: Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (463):781-785.
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  19. Marguerite La Caze (2007). Sartre Integrating Ethics and Politics: The Case of Terrorism. Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy 3:43-54.
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  20. M. M. La Caze (2006). The Asymmetry Between Apology and Forgiveness. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):447-468.
  21. Marguerite La Caze (2005). Beauvoir and The Second Sex: Feminism, Race, and the Origins of Existentialism (Review). Hypatia 14 (4):175-182.
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  22. Marguerite La Caze (2005). Love, That Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect. Hypatia 20 (3):92-114.
    Is love essential to ethical life, or merely a supplement? In Kant's view, respect and love, as duties, are in tension with each other because love involves drawing closer and respect involves drawing away. By contrast, Irigaray says that love and respect do not conflict because love as passion must also involve distancing and we have a responsibility to love. I argue that love, understood as passion and based on respect, is essential to ethics.
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  23. M. M. La Caze (2004). Not Just Visitors: Cosmopolitanism, Hospitality, and Refugees. Philosophy Today 48 (3):313-324.
    Recent philosophers, political scientists and cultural theorists have suggested that the concept of cosmopolitanism is useful to theorize an ideal relationship between different nations, and to confront the problems faced by asylum-seekers and refugees. Here, La Caze discusses Immanuel Kant's view of cosmopolitanism which occurs in the context of his teleological philosophy of history and his views on politics.
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  24. Damian Cox, Marguerite La Caze & Michael Levine (2003). Integrity and the Fragile Self. Ashgate.
    This book examines the centrality of integrity in relation to a variety of philosophical and psychological concerns that impinge upon the ethical life.
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  25. Marguerite la Caze (2002). Revaluing Envy and Resentment. Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):155 – 158.
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  26. Marguerite la Caze (2002). The Analytic Imaginary. Cornell University Press.
    lntroduction Imaginary and Images M philosophical imaginary refers to both the capacity to imagine and the stock of images philosophers use. ...
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  27. Marguerite La Caze (2002). The Encounter Between Wonder and Generosity. Hypatia 17 (3):1-19.
    : In a reading of René Descartes's The Passions of the Soul, Luce Irigaray explores the possibility that wonder, first of all passions, can provide the basis for an ethics of sexual difference because it is prior to judgment, and thus nonhierarchical. For Descartes, the passion of generosity gives the key to ethics. I argue that wonder should be extended to other differences and should be combined with generosity to form the basis of an ethics.
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  28. Marguerite La Caze (2001). Envy and Resentment. Philosophical Explorations 4 (1):31 – 45.
    Envy and resentment are generally thought to be unpleasant and unethical emotions which ought to be condemned. I argue that both envy and resentment, in some important forms, are moral emotions connected with concern for justice, understood in terms of desert and entitlement. They enable us to recognise injustice, work as a spur to acting against it and connect us to others. Thus, we should accept these emotions as part of the ethical life.
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  29. M. La Caze (1999). Review of Essay of Margaret Simons' Simone de Beauviour and The Second Sex: Feminism, Race and the Origins of Existentialism. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (4):175-181.
  30. Marguerite la Caze (1999). Book Review: Margaret A. Simons. Beauvoir and the Second Sex: Feminism, Race, and the Origins of Existentialism. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (4):175-182.