Search results for 'ME Burke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John P. Burke (1977). Edmund Burke: His Political Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):233-235.score: 180.0
  2. Edmund Burke, Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America.score: 180.0
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  3. Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IX. (Of 12).score: 180.0
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  4. Edmund Burke, Selections From the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke.score: 180.0
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  5. Edmund Burke, Selected Works of Edmund Burke.score: 180.0
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  6. John P. Burke (1976). The Social Thought of Rousseau and Burke: A Comparative Study (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):370-371.score: 180.0
  7. Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. I. (Of 12).score: 180.0
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  8. Edmund Burke (1960). The Philosophy of Edmund Burke. Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press.score: 180.0
  9. William Aron, William T. Burke & Milton Freeman (2003). Response to Mott From Aron, Burke, and Freeman. BioScience 53 (3):204.score: 180.0
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  10. Edmund Burke (1976). Edmund Burke on Government, Politics, and Society. International Publications Service.score: 180.0
  11. Edmund Burke (1968). Edmund Burke on Revolution. New York, Harper & Row.score: 180.0
  12. Edmund Burke (1960). Reflections with Edmund Burke. New York, Vantage Press.score: 180.0
  13. Edmund Burke (1999). The Portable Edmund Burke. Penguin Books.score: 180.0
  14. Joseph R. Stromberg, Rothbard and Burke Vs. The Cold War Burkeans.score: 54.0
    The monarchic, and aristocratical, and popular partisans have been jointly laying their axes to the root of all government, and have in their turns proved each other absurd and inconvenient. In vain you tell me that artificial government is good, but that I fall out only with the abuse. The thing! the thing itself is the abuse! ~ Edmund Burke, 1756..
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  15. Christopher J. Insole (2008). Two Conceptions of Liberalism: Theology, Creation, and Politics in the Thought of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Burke. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):447-489.score: 24.0
    Constitutional liberal practices are capable of being normatively grounded by a number of different metaphysical positions. Kant provides one such grounding, in terms of the autonomously derived moral law. I argue that the work of Edmund Burke provides a resource for an alternative construal of constitutional liberalism, compatible with, and illumined by, a broadly Thomistic natural law worldview. I contrast Burke's treatment of the relationship between truth and cognition, prudence and rights, with that of his contemporary, Kant. We (...)
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  16. Miodrag Jovanović (2014). Preispitivanje Pojma Međunarodnog Prava – o Metodološkim Aspektima. Revus 22:121-144.score: 24.0
    Ovaj rad se bavi metodološkim aspektima obnovljenih pravno-filozofskih nastojanja da se preispita pojam međunarodnog prava. Posle kratkog osvrta na istoriju pravne filozofije i ključne tačke Hartovog i Kelzenovog pozitivističkog stanovišta, u radu se dalje ispituje na koji način se savremene pravne teorije, kako u pozitivističkoj, tako i u ne-pozitivističkoj tradiciji, bave međunarodnim pravom. Poslednji deo rada predstavlja pokušaj da se skiciraju određene smernice za novi početak u filozofskoj obradi međunarodnog prava. Prvo, istorija rasprava u ovoj oblasti svedoči o tome da (...)
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  17. Bart Vandenabeele (2012). Beauty, Disinterested Pleasure, and Universal Communicability: Kant's Response to Burke. Kant-Studien 103 (2):207-233.score: 24.0
    Although Kant (wrongly) holds that the universal communicability of aesthetic judgments logically follows from the disinterested character of the pleasure upon which they are based, Kant's emphasis on the a priori validity of judgments of beauty can be viewed as a rebuttal of the kind of empiricist arguments that Burke offers to justify the social nature of the experience of beauty. I argue that the requirement of universal communicability is not a mere addition to the requirement of universal validity (...)
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  18. James Schmidt (2014). “This New Conquering Empire of Light and Reason”: Edmund Burke, James Gillray, and the Dangers of Enlightenment. Diametros 40:126-148.score: 24.0
    This article examines the use of images of “light” and “enlightenment” in Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France and in the controversy that greeted the book, with an emphasis on caricatures of Burke and his book by James Gillray and others. Drawing on Hans Blumenberg’s discussion of the metaphor of “light as truth,” it situates this controversy within the broader usage of images of light and reason in eighteenth-century frontispieces and (drawing on the work of J. (...)
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  19. Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert (2013). Narrative and Rhetorical Approaches to Problems of Education. Jerome Bruner and Kenneth Burke Revisited. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):327-343.score: 24.0
    Over the last few decades there has been a strong narrative turn within the humanities and social sciences in general and educational studies in particular. Especially Jerome Bruner’s theory of narrative as a specific ‘mode of knowing’ was very important for this growing body of work. To understand how the narrative mode works Bruner proposes to study narratives ‘at their far reach’—as an art form—and on several occasions he refers to the dramatistic pentad as an important method for ‘unpacking’ narratives. (...)
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  20. Jennifer Richards (forthcoming). Equipment for Thinking: Or Why Kenneth Burke is Still Worth Reading. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.score: 24.0
    In a market place crowded with practical rhetoric books what educational value could a challenging work such as Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric of Motives (1950) possibly have? Burke knows but doesn’t use the terminology of the classical art and rather than analysing the persuasive rhetoric of well-known speeches to equip us with strategies, he weaves his way around literary texts, teasing out meanings that their authors something intended, sometimes did not. Yet, despite such difficulties, A Rhetoric of Motives (...)
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  21. Christian Jecov Schallenmueller (2010). Religião e Revolução nas principais obras de Edmund Burke e Alexis de Tocqueville. Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 17:153-171.score: 24.0
    This paper aims at discussing the relations between religion and revolution according to Edmund Burke’s and Alexis de Tocqueville’s considerations on the unleashment of the French Revolution. There is a rare dialog between both authors made by the French thinker, mainly in his book The Old Regime and the Revolution. Nonetheless, I intend to deepen this dialog. This procedure will make it possible to review the comparisons – between the English and the French Revolutions – made by both authors (...)
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  22. Daniel Lago Monteiro (2011). Anarquia e Conformação das Coisas: algumas observações sobre revolução, história e linguagem em Edmund Burke. Doispontos 8 (1).score: 24.0
    The present paper begins with an analysis of a letter from Edmund Burke written in January 1790, the moment when the statesman declared himself against the French Revolution, in order to conjoin the letter with other texts from the author where the organic and hereditary aspects of civil society, as well as the forming and deforming role of words in political activity, are discussed. The second part of the text consists in the translation and notes of the aforesaid letter.
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  23. Clarke Rountree & John Rountree (forthcoming). Burke's Pentad as a Guide for Symbol-Using Citizens. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-14.score: 24.0
    Ever since the rhetorical turn in education, education scholars have recognized the importance of rhetoric in constructing and mediating human society. They have turned to rhetorical theory to come to terms with this rhetorically mediated reality and to engage students as critical citizens within it. Much of this work draws on rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke, but much of Burke’s work remains unexplored in this area. We argue that his theories can be part of a user’s guide to educate (...)
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  24. Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert (forthcoming). Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-9.score: 24.0
    In this article we introduce the special issue Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric, which brings together a number of contributions that were first presented at the conference Rhetoric as Equipment for Living. Kenneth Burke, Culture and Education (Ghent University, May 2013). Kenneth Burke [1897–1993] is one of the foundational figures in the development of what is known as the ‘new rhetoric’. The aim of the contributions to this special issue is to explore what is (...)
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  25. Russell Kirk (1953). The Conservative Mind, From Burke to Santayana. Chicago, H. Regnery Co..score: 21.0
  26. J. P. Joore (2007). Improving Independence of Elderly People by Introducing Smart Products: The Guide Me Localization Case. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (1):59-69.score: 21.0
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  27. Delia Graff Fara (2011). You Can Call Me 'Stupid', ... Just Don't Call Me Stupid. Analysis 71 (3):492-501.score: 18.0
    In this paper I argue that names are predicates when they occur in the appellation position of 'called'-predications. This includes not only proper names, but all names -- including quote-names of proper names and quote-names of other words or phrases. Thus in "You can call me Al", the proper name 'Al' is a predicate. And in "You can call me 'Al'," the quote-name of 'Al' -- namely ' 'Al' ' -- is also a predicate.
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  28. John Barresi, Black and White Like Me.score: 18.0
    John Griffi n’s classic on racism, Black Like Me (1960), provides an interesting text with which to investigate the development of a dialogical self. Griffi n becomes a black man for only a short period of time, but during that time he develops a black social identity and sense of personal identity, that contrasts radically with his former white identity. When he looks into a mirror on several occasions he engages in a dialogue with himself, as both a black and (...)
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  29. Kathleen B. Solon-Villaneza (2013). Hugo's “Notre Dame De Paris” and Rizal's “Noli Me Tangere”: A Phenomenology of Confluence. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 2 (1).score: 18.0
    The study subjected to scrutiny the context of Rizal’s novel Noli Me Tangere and Hugo’s novel, Notre Dame de Paris in the search for confluence through the two novels’ use of rhetorical devices and imagery. It utilized Kolb’s Experiential Method, Phenomenology, and Interdisciplinary Approach. Primarily, a connection between Hugo and Rizal is established since no studies relating the two writers existed. Gathered evidences proved the historical and biographical connections: the phenomenology of both writers’ existence in the same Romantic milieu, and (...)
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  30. Alison Bailey (1999). Despising an Identity They Taught Me to Claim. In Chris J. Cuomo & Kim Q. Hall (eds.), WHITENESS: FEMINIST PHILOSOPHICAL NARRATIVES.score: 18.0
    This essay is a personal philosophical reflection on particular dilemma privilege-cognizant white feminists face in thinking through how to use privilege in liberatory ways. Privilege takes on a new dimension for whites who resist common defensive or guilt-ridden responses to privilege and struggle to understand the connections between ill-gotten advantages and the genuine injustices that deny humanity to peoples of color. The temptation to despise whiteness and its accompanying privilege is a common response to white privilege awareness and it is (...)
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  31. Bill Faw (2000). My Amygdala-Orbitofrontal-Circuit Made Me Do It. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):167-179.score: 18.0
    I have suggested that the prefrontal cortex constitutes an ?executive committee? with five streams coming from posterior cortex and subcortical areas to five pre-frontal executive regions, each of which chairs at least one on-going ?sub-committee? and vies with the other executives for taking over central control of conscious attention and willed action. It is through the dynamic interaction of this executive committee that unified conscious experiences and a sense of continuous self-identity are created. There is growing evidence that the amygdala-orbitofrontal (...)
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  32. Peter King, A (Very) Little About Me.score: 18.0
    I was born in Boston, Lincolnshire (actually in Wyberton West Hospital, which no longer exists), educated (if that's the word) first at St Mary's Primary School (run by nuns at the time, which probably explains a lot about my later career if you're a Freudian, which I'm not. Its new incarnation is here), then at Boston Grammar School . At the latter I successfully navigated 'O'-levels, but nearly half-way through my 'A'-levels I developed a number of extra-curricular interests which distracted (...)
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  33. Stephen Bygrave (1993). Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In a career of over seventy years, Kenneth Burke has produced a body of challenging and fascinating theoretical work. This work has had a bigger reputation than it has had a readership. Burke has been hailed not only as a strong precursor of the work of Fredric Jameson, Frank Lentriccia, and others, but also as a powerful original thinker whose writings have yet to be grappled with. Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology is a lucid and accessible introduction (...)
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  34. Michael A. Mosher (1991). The Skeptic's Burke: Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790-1990. Political Theory 19 (3):391-418.score: 18.0
    The world of contingency and political combination is much larger than we are apt to imagine.Edmund Burke.
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  35. Eddy Nahmias, Jason Shepard & Shane Reuter (2014). It's OK If 'My Brain Made Me Do It': People's Intuitions About Free Will and Neuroscientific Prediction. Cognition 133 (2):502-516.score: 18.0
    In recent years, a number of prominent scientists have argued that free will is an illusion, appealing to evidence demonstrating that information about brain activity can be used to predict behavior before people are aware of having made a decision. These scientists claim that the possibility of perfect prediction based on neural information challenges the ordinary understanding of free will. In this paper we provide evidence suggesting that most people do not view the possibility of neuro-prediction as a threat to (...)
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  36. Richard Shusterman (2005). Somaesthetics and Burke's Sublime. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):323-341.score: 18.0
    Burke is an important exception to Nietzsche's claim that philosophical aesthetics ignores physiology and the role of practical interest. Grounded on the powerful interest of survival, Burke's theory of the sublime also offers a physiological explanation of our feelings of sublimity that explicitly defines certain conditions of our nerves as the ‘efficient cause’ of such feelings. While his general account of sublimity is widely appreciated, its somatic dimension has been dismissed as hopelessly misguided. In examining Burke's views (...)
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  37. Mark Hannam, Edmund Burke: Philosopher, Politician, Prophet.score: 18.0
    Review of Jesse Norman, "Edmund Burke: Philosopher, Politician, Prophet" (William Collins, 2013).
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  38. Rainer Trapp (1988). » Credo* Me* Cogitare Ergo Scio* Me* Esse1/2 « — Descartes' »Cogito Ergo Sum« Reinterpreted. Erkenntnis 28 (2):253 - 267.score: 18.0
    At first sight one might be tempted to regard Descartes' »cogito ergo sum« as logically true by existential generalisation. This however would neither exhaust the specific epistemic content of »cogito« nor reveal the philosophical peculiarities of »sum« which the author takes to have two ontologically different meanings. The full sense of »cogito ergo sum« finally turns out to be Credo* me* cogitare ergo scio* me* esse1/2. Furthermore this proposition can formally be proved to be true by means of epistemic logic.
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  39. Myra J. Christopher (2007). "Show Me" Bioethics and Politics. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (10):28 – 33.score: 18.0
    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy (...)
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  40. Margaret Kohn & Daniel I. O'Neill (2006). A Tale of Two Indias: Burke and Mill on Empire and Slavery in the West Indies and America. Political Theory 34 (2):192 - 228.score: 18.0
    The subject of empire has emerged as a central concern in political theory. Edmund Burke and John Stuart Mill have been at the center of much recent scholarship on this topic. A number of depictions of Burke as a critic and Mill as a defender of empire rely largely on their writings about India. This article focuses instead on Burke and Mill's writings on the West Indies and America from the standpoint of both thinkers' connection to Scottish (...)
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  41. Valerie Malhotra Bentz & Wade Kenny (1997). "Body-as-World": Kenneth Burke's Answer to the Postmodernist Charges Against Sociology. Sociological Theory 15 (1):81-96.score: 18.0
    Postmodernism charges that sociological methods project ways of thinking and being from the past onto the future, and that sociological forms of presentation are rhetorical defenses of ideologies. Postmodernism contends that sociological theory presents reified constructs no more based in reality than are fictional accounts. Kenneth Burke's logology predates and adequately addresses postmodernism's valid charges against sociology. At the same time, logology avoids the idealistic tendencies and ethical pitfalls of radical forms of postmodernist deconstruction, which acknowledge neither pretextual and (...)
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  42. Robert K. Meyer (2008). Ai, Me and Lewis (Abelian Implication, Material Equivalence and C I Lewis 1920). Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (2):169 - 181.score: 18.0
    C I Lewis showed up Down Under in 2005, in e-mails initiated by Allen Hazen of Melbourne. Their topic was the system Hazen called FL (a Funny Logic), axiomatized in passing in Lewis 1921. I show that FL is the system MEN of material equivalence with negation. But negation plays no special role in MEN. Symbolizing equivalence with → and defining ∼A inferentially as A→f, the theorems of MEN are just those of the underlying theory ME of pure material equivalence. (...)
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  43. Robert E. Watkins (2010). Politics in Medias Res: Power That Precedes and Exceeds in Foucault and Burke. History of the Human Sciences 23 (2):1-19.score: 18.0
    Foucault famously claimed that in political theory the king’s head still needs to be cut off, proclaiming the imperative to move beyond a centralized and prohibitive conception of power and toward a more distributed, relational and productive understanding of power in political society. Ironically, Edmund Burke, famous for criticizing an actual revolutionary regicide in France, can be read as an ally in Foucault’s project of theoretical regicide and conceptual revolution. For although he staunchly defended existing monarchies in France and (...)
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  44. Charles W. Parkin (1956/1968). The Moral Basis of Burke's Political Thought. New York, Russell & Russell.score: 18.0
    The writings on Burke which I have found most useful are the following: J. MacCunn, The Political Philosophy of Burke, 1913. CE Vaughan, Studies in the ...
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  45. Jaroslav Peregrin, Ještě Několik Poznámek K Tomu, Co Je V Mé Knize.score: 18.0
    Reakce Petra Koťátka na moji odpověď na jeho kritiku mé knihy (‘Struktura, význam, interpretace’, Filosofický časopis 49, 2001, 509-521) se mi jeví být podstatně věcnější a pro mne stravitelnější než jeho předchozí text; a mám pocit, že teď přece jenom některým jeho výhradám lépe rozumím. To mne vede k tomu, abych se ještě k několika bodům našeho sporu ještě jednou alespoň krátce vrátil; omezím se však již jen na to cco se mi jeví jako skutečně zásadně podstatné a nebudu se (...)
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  46. Richard Rymarz (2012). God Calls Me Miriam [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (1):126.score: 18.0
    Rymarz, Richard Review(s) of: God calls me Miriam, by Miriam Elizabeth Stulberg, Combermere, ON: Madonna House Publications 2009, pp.299, pb.
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  47. Halla Beloff (1988). The Eye and the Me: Self‐Portraits of Eminent Photographers. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):295-311.score: 18.0
    Abstract The Me as a socially constructed self presenting itself, is the subject of new conceptual interest. Discourse analysis is the preferred tool for analysis of the linguistic repertoires that we use to order the experience of our selves. But we also present ourselves visually, with some care. An attempt is made to apply a kind of discourse analysis to self?portraits by eminent photographers. Within the process of portraiture and the rules of the pose, professionals should be able to present (...)
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  48. Zhihua Yao (2013). “I Have Lost Me”: Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):511-526.score: 18.0
    The parable of the butterfly dream is one of the most interesting and influential passages among Zhuangzi's beautiful writings. This article interprets the butterfly dream from an interdisciplinary approach. The review of mythological and religious sources reveals that the image of the butterfly is widely understood to symbolize the human self or soul. The scientific study of dream experience touches upon the issue of self-consciousness and the sense of two-tiered self. The philosophical and psychological perspectives further highlight the tension between (...)
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  49. Frederick A. Dreyer (1979). Burke's Politics: A Study in Whig Orthodoxy. Wilfrid Laurier University Press.score: 18.0
    One Introduction The student who tries to define Edmund Burke's political theory attempts something that Burke refused to do himself. ...
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  50. Kenneth Einar Himma (2011). Explaining Why This Body Gives Rise to Me Qua Subject Instead of Someone Else : An Argument for Classical Substance Dualism. Religious Studies 47 (4):431 - 448.score: 18.0
    Since something cannot be conscious without being a conscious subject, a complete physicalist explanation of consciousness must resolve an issue first raised by Thomas Nagel, namely to explain why a particular mass of atoms that comprises my body gives rise to me as conscious subject, rather than someone else.In this essay, I describe a thought-experiment that suggests that physicalism lacks the resources to address Nagel's question and seems to pose a counter-example to any form of non-reductive physicalism relying on the (...)
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