Search results for 'ME Burke' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Megan Burke (Oklahoma State University)
  1. Greg F. Burke (2007). Let Me Go to the Father’s House: John Paul II’s Strength in Weakness, by Stanislaw Dziwisz, Czeslaw Drazek, S.J., Renato Buzzonetti. And Angelo Comastri. [REVIEW] The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (2):418-420.
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  2.  2
    Kenneth Burke (1978). A Critical Load, Beyond That Door; Or, Before the Ultimate Confrontation; Or, When Thinking of Deconstructionist Structuralists; Or, A Hermeneutic Fantasy. Critical Inquiry 5 (1):199-200.
    Dedicated to the humanisticissimus and/or humanisticissima Editoreality of Critical Inquiry, an enterprise that is doing all possible to restore for Criticism its rightful home, namely: a state of perpetual Crisis. How now?You say"The manwalks down the street." Then tell me howyour wordsmake sense. Kenneth Burke's contributions to Critical Inquiry are "In Response to Booth: Dancing with Tears in my Eyes" , " Post-Poesque Derivation of a Terministic Cluster" , " Motion/ Action" ,and "Methodological Repression and/or Strategies of Containment".
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  3. Kenneth Burke (1978). Methodological Repression and/or Strategies of Containment. Critical Inquiry 5 (2):401-416.
    Fredric Jameson's exacting essay, "The Symbolic Interference; or, Kenneth Burke and Ideological Analysis" Critical Inquiry 4 [Spring 1978]: 507-23) moves me to comment. I shall apply one of my charges of my title to him, he applies the other to me. The matter is further complicated by the fact that there is a distance at which they are hard to tell apart. For any expression of something implies a repression of something else, and any statement that goes only so (...)
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  4.  5
    Anthony Burke (2005). For a Cautious Utopianism. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (2):97–98.
    Burke thanks Professor Elshtain for her response "and the editors for inviting me to make some clarifications and engage in what is emerging as a profound normative dispute about the underlying hopes and worldview of 'just war' thinkers and various post-Kantian tendencies.".
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  5. Edmund Burke & Charles William Wentworth Fitzwilliam Fitzwilliam (1831). A Letter From the Late Right Honourable Edmund Burke to a Noble Lord on the Attacks Made Upon Him and His Pension, in the House of Lords, by the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Lauderdale, 1796. C.J.G. And F. Rivington.
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  6. Kenneth Burke, Herbert W. Simons & Trevor Melia (1989). The Legacy of Kenneth Burke.
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  7. Edmund Burke (1997). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Volume 1 of the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. They demonstrate in a variety of ways how determined he was to become involved in the social and intellectual life of his (...)
     
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  8. Edmund Burke (1978). The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, Volume X: Index. University of Chicago Press.
    This, the last volume in the series, provides the keys to all the others. All letters to and from Burke are listed, and the material in the letters themselves analysed in a comprehensive general index.
     
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  9. Edmund Burke (1991). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: India, the Launching of the Hastings Impeachment 1786-1788. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume continues the story of Burke and the affairs of the East India Company which was begun in Volume V. By 1786, Burke had fixed on Warren Hastings as the main culprit for the abuses that seemed to him so glaring. He greeted Hastings's return to Britain with a parliamentary attack which culminated in a trial by impeachment in the House of Lords. This was to be one of Burke's major preoccupations for the rest of his (...)
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  10. Edmund Burke (1996). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Party, Parliament, and the American War 1774-1780. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume of The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke continues the story of Edmund Burke, the Rockingham party in British politics, and the American crisis. By 1774 Burke was already recognized as a master of parliamentary debate and an accomplished writer. By 1780, however, his reputation was to have risen substantially. Probably the most important single reason was his Speech on Conciliation with America, which was presented to the House of Commons in March 1775, published, and (...)
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  11. Edmund Burke (1997). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: The Early Writings. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Volume 1 of the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. They demonstrate in a variety of ways how determined he was to become involved in the social and intellectual life of his (...)
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  12. Edmund Burke (1990). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: The French Revolution 1790-1794. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Edmund Burke was one of the most influential commentators on the events of the French Revolution. This edition throws new light on Burke's motives, and the reasons why his writings were both widely read and widely rejected.
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  13. Edmund Burke (2000). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Volume Vii: India: The Hastings Trial. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This key volume specifically completes the collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches which is set within the series, and is both an exposition of Burke's views on India from his coverage of the Hastings trial, and his views on maintaining the rule of a universal justice. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts. Indeed many of the shorter speeches appear (...)
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  14. Edmund Burke (1991). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Part I. The Revolutionary War, 1794-1797; Part Ii. Ireland. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume of Burke's writings and speeches is divided into two parts. The first covers the period between the time of his retirement from the House of Commons in 1794 and his death in 1797. His main preoccupation during this period was, of course, the French Revolution and the progress of the war against France. Surveying developments with dismay and apprehension, he produced a critique of the Revolution which expressed much of his mature thinking on political and social life, (...)
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  15.  7
    Edmund Burke, Selected Works of Edmund Burke.
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  16.  30
    John P. Burke (1977). Edmund Burke: His Political Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):233-235.
  17.  11
    John P. Burke (1976). The Social Thought of Rousseau and Burke: A Comparative Study. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):370-371.
  18.  12
    Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IX. (Of 12).
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  19.  11
    Edmund Burke, Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America.
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  20.  7
    Edmund Burke, Selections From the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke.
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  21.  5
    Kenneth Burke & Margaret Schlauch (1938). Twelve Propositions by Kenneth Burke on the Relation Between Economics and Psychology. Science and Society 2 (2):242 - 253.
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  22.  1
    T. E. Burke (1976). Theological Originality: T. E. BURKE. Religious Studies 12 (1):1-20.
    In contemporary discussion of the philosophy of religion, or for that matter of any branch of philosophy, the names of Whitehead and Wittgenstein are not often linked. Whitehead's later work is, for the most part, treated as a rather specialized interest, an attractively under-cultivated field for the enterprising thesis-writer perhaps, but well away from the main centres of current philosophical activity. And what he has to say about specifically religious or theological issues 1 becomes simply one ramification of an ingenious (...)
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  23.  1
    Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, A New Edition. Vol. 5.
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  24.  5
    Edmund Burke, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. I. (Of 12).
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  25. Edmund Burke (1970). A Philosophical Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful [by E. Burke]. Scolar Press Facs. Scolar Press.
     
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  26. Kenneth Burke (1961). Attitudes Toward History / by Kenneth Burke. Beacon Press.
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  27. Edmund Burke (1976). Edmund Burke on Government, Politics, and Society. International Publications Service.
  28. Edmund Burke (1968). Edmund Burke on Revolution. New York, Harper & Row.
     
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  29. Edmund Burke (1960). Reflections with Edmund Burke. New York, Vantage Press.
  30. T. E. Burke (1979). The Eternal Thou: T. E. Burke. Philosophy 54 (207):71-85.
    ‘Every particular Thou is a glimpse through to the eternal Thou; by means of every particular Thou the primary word addresses the eternal Thou … the Thou that by its nature cannot become It .’.
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  31. Edmund Burke (1999). The Portable Edmund Burke. Penguin Books.
  32. Edmund Burke (1960). The Philosophy of Edmund Burke. Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press.
     
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  33. Edmund Burke (1798). The Sublime and Beautiful, by E. Burke.
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  34. Edmund Burke, T. Mcloughlin, James T. Boulton & P. Marshall (2000). The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke. Volume 1. The Early Writing. Volume 7. India: The Hasting Trial 1789-1794. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 62 (4):761-762.
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  35. Joseph R. Stromberg, Rothbard and Burke Vs. The Cold War Burkeans.
    The monarchic, and aristocratical, and popular partisans have been jointly laying their axes to the root of all government, and have in their turns proved each other absurd and inconvenient. In vain you tell me that artificial government is good, but that I fall out only with the abuse. The thing! the thing itself is the abuse! ~ Edmund Burke, 1756..
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  36.  1
    Wayne C. Booth (1974). Kenneth Burke's Way of Knowing. Critical Inquiry 1 (1):1-22.
    Kenneth Burke is, at long last, beginning to get the attention he de- serves. Among anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, and rhetori- cians his "dramatism" is increasingly recognized as something that must at least appear in one's index, whether one has troubled to understand him or not. Even literary critics are beginning to see him as not just one more "new critic" but as someone who tried to lead a revolt against "narrow formalism" long before the currently fashionable explosion into the (...)
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  37. Dan Zahavi & Uriah Kriegel (2015). For-Me-Ness: What It is and What It is Not. In D. Dahlstrom, A. Elpidorou & W. Hopp (eds.), Philosophy of Mind and Phenomenology. Routledge 36-53.
    The alleged for-me-ness or mineness of conscious experience has been the topic of considerable debate in recent phenomenology and philosophy of mind. By considering a series of objections to the notion of for-me-ness, or to a properly robust construal of it, this paper attempts to clarify to what the notion is committed and to what it is not committed. This exercise results in the emergence of a relatively determinate and textured portrayal of for-me-ness as the authors conceive of it.
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  38.  30
    Marie Guillot (2016). I Me Mine: On a Confusion Concerning the Subjective Character of Experience. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-31.
    In recent debates on phenomenal consciousness, a distinction is sometimes made, after Levine (2001) and Kriegel (2009), between the “qualitative character” of an experience, i.e. the specific way it feels to the subject (e.g. blueish or sweetish or pleasant), and its “subjective character”, i.e. the fact that there is anything at all that it feels like to her. I argue that much discussion of subjective character is affected by a conflation between three different notions. I start by disentangling the three (...)
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  39.  30
    Tom Frost, Rancière, Human Rights and the Limits of a Politics of Process.
    In thinking about Rancière and Law, as this collection exhorts us to do, I have turned my attention to one of the most well-known areas of Rancière’s writings, the Rights of Man. In “Who is the Subject of the Rights of Man?”, Rancière aimed a broadside at the rights-scepticism which can be traced in much of critical theory to the writings of Hannah Arendt, and an older tradition on the right exemplified by Edmund Burke and Jeremy Bentham. Rancière’s writings (...)
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  40. Miodrag Jovanović (2014). Preispitivanje Pojma Međunarodnog Prava – o Metodološkim Aspektima. Revus 22:121-144.
    Ovaj rad se bavi metodološkim aspektima obnovljenih pravno-filozofskih nastojanja da se preispita pojam međunarodnog prava. Posle kratkog osvrta na istoriju pravne filozofije i ključne tačke Hartovog i Kelzenovog pozitivističkog stanovišta, u radu se dalje ispituje na koji način se savremene pravne teorije, kako u pozitivističkoj, tako i u ne-pozitivističkoj tradiciji, bave međunarodnim pravom. Poslednji deo rada predstavlja pokušaj da se skiciraju određene smernice za novi početak u filozofskoj obradi međunarodnog prava. Prvo, istorija rasprava u ovoj oblasti svedoči o tome da (...)
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  41.  16
    Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert (2013). Narrative and Rhetorical Approaches to Problems of Education. Jerome Bruner and Kenneth Burke Revisited. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):327-343.
    Over the last few decades there has been a strong narrative turn within the humanities and social sciences in general and educational studies in particular. Especially Jerome Bruner’s theory of narrative as a specific ‘mode of knowing’ was very important for this growing body of work. To understand how the narrative mode works Bruner proposes to study narratives ‘at their far reach’—as an art form—and on several occasions he refers to the dramatistic pentad as an important method for ‘unpacking’ narratives. (...)
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  42.  5
    Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert (2015). Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):339-347.
    In this article we introduce the special issue Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric, which brings together a number of contributions that were first presented at the conference Rhetoric as Equipment for Living. Kenneth Burke, Culture and Education. Kenneth Burke [1897–1993] is one of the foundational figures in the development of what is known as the ‘new rhetoric’. The aim of the contributions to this special issue is to explore what is pedagogical about Burke’s (...)
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  43. Jeremy Waldron (1992). 'Nonsense Upon Stilts': Bentham, Burke and Marx on the Rights of Man. Studies in Soviet Thought 43 (1):68-71.
    In _Nonsense upon Stilts¸_ first published in 1987, Waldron includes and discusses extracts from three classic critiques of the idea of natural rights embodied in the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen. Each text is prefaced by an historical introduction and an analysis of its main themes. The collection as a whole in introduced with an essay tracing the philosophical background to the three critiques as well as the eighteenth-century idea of natural rights which they attacked. (...)
     
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  44.  17
    Victor Turner (1980). Social Dramas and Stories About Them. Critical Inquiry 7 (1):141-168.
    Although it might be argued that the social drama is a story in [Hayden] White's sense, in that it has discernible inaugural, transitional, and terminal motifs, that is, a beginning, a middle, and an end, my observations convince me that it is, indeed, a spontaneous unit of social process and a fact of everyone's experience in every human society. My hypothesis, based on repeated observations of such processual units in a range of sociocultural systems and in my reading in ethnography (...)
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  45. Stephen K. White (2002). Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics, and Aesthetics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics, and Aesthetics examines the philosophy of Burke in view of its contribution to our understanding of modernity. Stephen K. White argues that Burke shows us how modernity engenders an implicit forgetfulness of human finitude. White illustrates this theme by showing how Burke's political thought, his judgment of the "modern system of morality and policy," and its taste for a "false sublime" are structured by his aesthetics.
     
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  46.  19
    Bart Vandenabeele (2012). Beauty, Disinterested Pleasure, and Universal Communicability: Kant's Response to Burke. Kant-Studien 103 (2):207-233.
    Although Kant (wrongly) holds that the universal communicability of aesthetic judgments logically follows from the disinterested character of the pleasure upon which they are based, Kant's emphasis on the a priori validity of judgments of beauty can be viewed as a rebuttal of the kind of empiricist arguments that Burke offers to justify the social nature of the experience of beauty. I argue that the requirement of universal communicability is not a mere addition to the requirement of universal validity (...)
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  47.  9
    James Schmidt (2014). “This New Conquering Empire of Light and Reason”: Edmund Burke, James Gillray, and the Dangers of Enlightenment. Diametros 40:126-148.
    This article examines the use of images of “light” and “enlightenment” in Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France and in the controversy that greeted the book, with an emphasis on caricatures of Burke and his book by James Gillray and others. Drawing on Hans Blumenberg’s discussion of the metaphor of “light as truth,” it situates this controversy within the broader usage of images of light and reason in eighteenth-century frontispieces and (drawing on the work of J. (...)
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  48.  24
    Christopher Insole (2008). Two Conceptions of Liberalism: Theology, Creation, and Politics in the Thought of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Burke. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):447-489.
    Constitutional liberal practices are capable of being normatively grounded by a number of different metaphysical positions. Kant provides one such grounding, in terms of the autonomously derived moral law. I argue that the work of Edmund Burke provides a resource for an alternative construal of constitutional liberalism, compatible with, and illumined by, a broadly Thomistic natural law worldview. I contrast Burke's treatment of the relationship between truth and cognition, prudence and rights, with that of his contemporary, Kant. We (...)
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  49.  4
    Clarke Rountree & John Rountree (2015). Burke’s Pentad as a Guide for Symbol-Using Citizens. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):349-362.
    Ever since the rhetorical turn in education, education scholars have recognized the importance of rhetoric in constructing and mediating human society. They have turned to rhetorical theory to come to terms with this rhetorically mediated reality and to engage students as critical citizens within it. Much of this work draws on rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke, but much of Burke’s work remains unexplored in this area. We argue that his theories can be part of a user’s guide to educate (...)
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  50.  5
    Jennifer Richards (2015). Equipment for Thinking: Or Why Kenneth Burke is Still Worth Reading. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):363-375.
    In a market place crowded with practical rhetoric books what educational value could a challenging work such as Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric of Motives possibly have? Burke knows but doesn’t use the terminology of the classical art and rather than analysing the persuasive rhetoric of well-known speeches to equip us with strategies, he weaves his way around literary texts, teasing out meanings that their authors something intended, sometimes did not. Yet, despite such difficulties, A Rhetoric of Motives is (...)
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