Search results for 'Machine Consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan A. J. Stuart (2011). Enkinaesthesia: The Fundamental Challenge for Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):145-162.score: 105.0
    In this short paper I will introduce an idea which, I will argue, presents a fundamental additional challenge to the machine consciousness community. The idea takes the questions surrounding phenomenology, qualia and phenomenality one step further into the realm of intersubjectivity but with a twist, and the twist is this: that an agent’s intersubjective experience is deeply felt and necessarily co-affective; it is enkinaesthetic, and only through enkinaesthetic awareness can we establish the affective enfolding which enables first the (...)
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  2. Roberto Cordeschi (2010). Which Kind of Machine Consciousness? International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (01):31-33.score: 93.0
    Aaron Sloman remarks that a lot of present disputes on consciousness are usually based, on the one hand, on re-inventing “ideas that have been previously discussed at lenght by others”, on the other hand, on debating “unresolvable” issues, such as that about which animals have phenomenal consciousness. For what it’s worth I would make a couple of examples, which are related to certain topics that Sloman deals with in his paper, and that might be useful for introducing some (...)
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  3. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2012). MachineConsciousness and “Artificial” Thought: An Operational Architectonics Model Guided Approach. Brain Research 1428:80-92.score: 90.0
    Instead of using low-level neurophysiology mimicking and exploratory programming methods commonly used in the machine consciousness field, the hierarchical Operational Architectonics (OA) framework of brain and mind functioning proposes an alternative conceptual-theoretical framework as a new direction in the area of model-driven machine (robot) consciousness engineering. The unified brain-mind theoretical OA model explicitly captures (though in an informal way) the basic essence of brain functional architecture, which indeed constitutes a theory of consciousness. The OA describes (...)
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  4. Piotr Boltuc (2009). The Philosophical Issue in Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):155-176.score: 78.0
    The truly philosophical issue in machine conscioiusness is whether machines can have 'hard consciounsess' (like in Chalmers' hard problem of consciousness). Criteria for hard consciousness are higher than for phenomenal consciousness, since the latter incorporates first-person functional consciousness.
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  5. Catherine Legg (2004). Review of Holland (Ed.) "Machine Consciousness&Quot;. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Reviews Online 2004 (Sep).score: 75.0
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  6. Susan A. J. Stuart (2007). Machine Consciousness: Cognitive and Kinaesthetic Imagination. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):141-153.score: 63.0
    Machine consciousness exists already in organic systems and it is only a matter of time -- and some agreement -- before it will be realised in reverse-engineered organic systems and forward- engineered inorganic systems. The agreement must be over the preconditions that must first be met if the enterprise is to be successful, and it is these preconditions, for instance, being a socially-embedded, structurally-coupled and dynamic, goal-directed entity that organises its perceptual input and enacts its world through the (...)
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  7. Owen Holland (2007). A Strongly Embodied Approach to Machine Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):97-110.score: 63.0
    Over sixty years ago, Kenneth Craik noted that, if an organism (or an artificial agent) carried 'a small-scale model of external reality and of its own possible actions within its head', it could use the model to behave intelligently. This paper argues that the possible actions might best be represented by interactions between a model of reality and a model of the agent, and that, in such an arrangement, the internal model of the agent might be a transparent model of (...)
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  8. Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2009). Machine Consciousness: A Manifesto for Robotics. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):33-51.score: 60.0
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  9. Igor Aleksander (2009). The Potential Impact of Machine Consciousness in Science and Engineering. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):1-9.score: 60.0
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  10. Aaron Sloman (2010). Machine Consciousness: Response to Commentaries. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (01):75-116.score: 60.0
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  11. Raúl Arrabales, Agapito Ledezma & Araceli Sanchis (2010). The Cognitive Development of Machine Consciousness Implementations. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (02):213-225.score: 60.0
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  12. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2009). Brain and Mind Operational Architectonics and Man-Made “MachineConsciousness. Cognitive Processing 10 (2):105-111.score: 60.0
    To build a true conscious robot requires that a robot’s “brain” be capable of supporting the phenomenal consciousness as human’s brain enjoys. Operational Architectonics framework through exploration of the temporal structure of information flow and inter-area interactions within the network of functional neuronal populations [by examining topographic sharp transition processes in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) on the millisecond scale] reveals and describes the EEG architecture which is analogous to the architecture of the phenomenal world. This suggests that the task (...)
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  13. Klaus Raizer, André L. O. Paraense & Ricardo R. Gudwin (2012). A Cognitive Architecture with Incremental Levels of Machine Consciousness Inspired by Cognitive Neuroscience. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (02):335-352.score: 60.0
  14. Raúl Arrabales, Agapito Ledezma & Araceli Sanchis (2009). Strategies for Measuring Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (02):193-201.score: 60.0
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  15. Janusz A. Starzyk & Dilip K. Prasad (2011). A Computational Model of Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):255-281.score: 60.0
  16. Stan Franklin, Sidney D'Mello, Bernard J. Baars & Uma Ramamurthy (2009). Evolutionary Pressures for Perceptual Stability and Self as Guides to Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):99-110.score: 60.0
  17. Carlos Hernández, Ignacio López & Ricardo Sanz (2009). The Operative Mind: A Functional, Computational and Modeling Approach to Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):83-98.score: 60.0
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  18. Pentti O. A. Haikonen (2009). Machine Consciousness: New Opportunities for Information Technology Industry. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (02):181-184.score: 60.0
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  19. Aaron Sloman (2010). An Alternative to Working on Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (01):1-18.score: 60.0
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  20. Pierre Bonzon (2011). Towards Machine Consciousness: Grounding Abstract Models as Π-Processes. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):1-17.score: 60.0
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  21. Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1996). Consciousness and the Machine. Zygon 31 (2):235-52.score: 60.0
  22. J. C. Nyíri (forthcoming). Wittgenstein and the Problem of Machine Consciousness. Grazer Philosophische Studien 33:375-394.score: 60.0
    For any given society, its particular technology of communication has far-reaching consequences, not merely as regards social organization, but on the epistemic level as well. Plato's name-theory of meaning represents the transition from the age of primary orality to that of literacy; Wittgenstein's use-theory of meaning stands for the transition from the age of literacy to that of a second orality (audiovisual communication, electronic information processing). On the basis of a use-theory of meaning the problem of machine consciousness, (...)
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  23. Whitby Blay (2013). When is Any Agent a Moral Agent?: Reflections on Machine Consciousness and Moral Agency. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (1).score: 60.0
  24. Pietro Perconti (2013). Two Kinds of Common Sense Knowledge (and a Constraint for Machine Consciousness Design). International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (1):95-101.score: 60.0
  25. Igor Aleksander, Susan Stuart & Tom Ziemke (2008). Assessing Artificial Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.score: 57.0
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. 1 The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti (...)
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  26. Aaron Sloman & Ronald L. Chrisley (2003). Virtual Machines and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):133-172.score: 57.0
    Replication or even modelling of consciousness in machines requires some clarifications and refinements of our concept of consciousness. Design of, construction of, and interaction with artificial systems can itself assist in this conceptual development. We start with the tentative hypothesis that although the word “consciousness” has no well-defined meaning, it is used to refer to aspects of human and animal informationprocessing. We then argue that we can enhance our understanding of what these aspects might be by designing (...)
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  27. Nicholas Boltuc & Peter Boltuc (2007). Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI: An Early Conceptual Framework. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. AAAI Press, Merlo Park, CA.score: 57.0
    We should eventually understand how exactly first person phenomenal consciousness is generated. When we do, we should be able to enginner one for robots. This is the engineering thesis in machine consciousness.
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  28. William Y. Adams (2004). Machine Consciousness: Plausible Idea or Semantic Distortion? Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):46-56.score: 54.0
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  29. Owen Holland & Russell B. Goodman (2003). Robots with Internal Models: A Route to Machine Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4):77-109.score: 54.0
  30. Susan A. J. Stuart (2010). Conscious Machines: Memory, Melody and Muscular Imagination. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):37-51.score: 54.0
    A great deal of effort has been, and continues to be, devoted to developing consciousness artificially (A small selection of the many authors writing in this area includes: Cotterill (J Conscious Stud 2:290–311, 1995 , 1998 ), Haikonen ( 2003 ), Aleksander and Dunmall (J Conscious Stud 10:7–18, 2003 ), Sloman ( 2004 , 2005 ), Aleksander ( 2005 ), Holland and Knight ( 2006 ), and Chella and Manzotti ( 2007 )), and yet a similar amount of effort (...)
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  31. Owen Holland (ed.) (2003). Machine Consciousness. Imprint Academic.score: 54.0
    In this collection of essays we hear from an international array of computer and brain scientists who are actively working from both the machine and human ends...
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  32. Owen Holland, Rob Knight & Richard Newcombe (2007). The Role of the Self Process in Embodied Machine Consciousness. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic. 156-173.score: 54.0
  33. Ricardo Sanz, Ignacio López & Julita Bermejo-Alonso (2007). A Rationale and Vision for Machine Consciousness in Complex Controllers. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic. 141-155.score: 54.0
     
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  34. John G. Taylor (2007). Through Machine Attention to Machine Consciousness. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic. 24-47.score: 54.0
  35. David Gamez (2012). Empirically Grounded Claims About Consciousness in Computers. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (02):421-438.score: 51.0
    Research is starting to identify correlations between consciousness and some of the spatiotemporal patterns in the physical brain. For theoretical and practical reasons, the results of experiments on the correlates of consciousness have ambiguous interpretations. At any point in time a number of hypotheses co-exist about and the correlates of consciousness in the brain, which are all compatible with the current experimental results. This paper argues that consciousness should be attributed to any system that exhibits spatiotemporal (...)
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  36. Igor L. Aleksander (2007). Machine Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.score: 48.0
  37. Igor L. Aleksander (2006). Machine Consciousness. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.score: 48.0
  38. D. Gamez (2008). Progress in Machine Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):887-910.score: 48.0
  39. Piotr Boltuc (2012). The Engineering Thesis in Machine Consciousness. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 16 (2):187-207.score: 48.0
    I argue here that consciousness can be engineered. The claim that functional consciousness can be engineered has been persuasively put forth in regards to first-person functional consciousness; robots, for instance, can recognize colors, though there is still much debate about details of this sort of consciousness. Such consciousness has now become one of the meanings of the term phenomenal consciousness (e.g., as used by Franklin and Baars). Yet, we extend the argument beyond the tradition (...)
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  40. Antonio Chella & Irene Macaluso (2007). Machine Consciousness in CiceRobot, A Museum Guide Robot. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), Ai and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. Aaai Press, Merlo Park, Ca.score: 48.0
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  41. Robert Clowes, Steve Torrance & Ron Chrisley (2007). Machine Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):7-14.score: 48.0
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  42. Owen Holland & Rod Goodman (2003). Robots With Internal Models A Route to Machine Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):4-5.score: 48.0
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  43. Shan Gao (2008). A Quantum Theory of Consciousness. Minds and Machines 18 (1):39-52.score: 46.0
    The relationship between quantum collapse and consciousness is reconsidered under the assumption that quantum collapse is an objective dynamical process. We argue that the conscious observer can have a distinct role from the physical measuring device during the process of quantum collapse owing to the intrinsic nature of consciousness; the conscious observer can know whether he is in a definite state or a quantum superposition of definite states, while the physical measuring device cannot “know”. As a result, the (...)
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  44. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (1995). A Critique of Information Processing Theories of Consciousness. Minds and Machines 5 (1):89-107.score: 46.0
    Information processing theories in psychology give rise to executive theories of consciousness. Roughly speaking, these theories maintain that consciousness is a centralized processor that we use when processing novel or complex stimuli. The computational assumptions driving the executive theories are closely tied to the computer metaphor. However, those who take the metaphor serious — as I believe psychologists who advocate the executive theories do — end up accepting too particular a notion of a computing device. In this essay, (...)
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  45. Blake H. Dournaee (2010). Comments on “The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI”. Minds and Machines 20 (2):303-309.score: 46.0
    In their joint paper entitled The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and BIO-AI (Boltuc et al. Replication of the hard problem of conscious in AI and Bio- AI: An early conceptual framework 2008), Nicholas and Piotr Boltuc suggest that machines could be equipped with phenomenal consciousness, which is subjective consciousness that satisfies Chalmer’s hard problem (We will abbreviate the hard problem of consciousness as H-consciousness ). The claim is that if we (...)
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  46. Natika Newton (1989). Machine Understanding and the Chinese Room. Philosophical Psychology 2 (2):207-15.score: 45.0
    John Searle has argued that one can imagine embodying a machine running any computer program without understanding the symbols, and hence that purely computational processes do not yield understanding. The disagreement this argument has generated stems, I hold, from ambiguity in talk of 'understanding'. The concept is analysed as a relation between subjects and symbols having two components: a formal and an intentional. The central question, then becomes whether a machine could possess the intentional component with or without (...)
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  47. Robert L. Arrington (1999). Machines, Consciousness, and Thought. Idealistic Studies 29 (3):231-243.score: 45.0
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  48. J. Jonkisz (2012). Consciousness: A Four-Fold Taxonomy. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (11-12):55-82.score: 45.0
    This paper argues that the many and various conceptions of consciousness propounded by cognitive scientists and philosophers can all be understood as constituted with reference to four fundamental sorts of criterion: epistemic (concerned with kinds of consciousness), semantic (dealing with orders of consciousness), physiological (reflecting states of consciousness), and pragmatic (seeking to capture types of consciousness). The resulting four-fold taxonomy, intended to be exhaustive, suggests that all of the distinct varieties of consciousness currently encountered (...)
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