Search results for 'Machine Consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert James M. Boyles (2012). Artificial Qualia, Intentional Systems and Machine Consciousness. In Proceedings of the Research@DLSU Congress 2012: Science and Technology Conference. 110a–110c.
    In the field of machine consciousness, it has been argued that in order to build human-like conscious machines, we must first have a computational model of qualia. To this end, some have proposed a framework that supports qualia in machines by implementing a model with three computational areas (i.e., the subconceptual, conceptual, and linguistic areas). These abstract mechanisms purportedly enable the assessment of artificial qualia. However, several critics of the machine consciousness project dispute this possibility. For (...)
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  2. Susan A. J. Stuart (2011). Enkinaesthesia: The Fundamental Challenge for Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):145-162.
    In this short paper I will introduce an idea which, I will argue, presents a fundamental additional challenge to the machine consciousness community. The idea takes the questions surrounding phenomenology, qualia and phenomenality one step further into the realm of intersubjectivity but with a twist, and the twist is this: that an agent’s intersubjective experience is deeply felt and necessarily co-affective; it is enkinaesthetic, and only through enkinaesthetic awareness can we establish the affective enfolding which enables first the (...)
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  3.  28
    Roberto Cordeschi (2010). Which Kind of Machine Consciousness? International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (1):31-33.
    Aaron Sloman remarks that a lot of present disputes on consciousness are usually based, on the one hand, on re-inventing “ideas that have been previously discussed at lenght by others”, on the other hand, on debating “unresolvable” issues, such as that about which animals have phenomenal consciousness. For what it’s worth I would make a couple of examples, which are related to certain topics that Sloman deals with in his paper, and that might be useful for introducing some (...)
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  4.  60
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2012). MachineConsciousness and “Artificial” Thought: An Operational Architectonics Model Guided Approach. Brain Research 1428:80-92.
    Instead of using low-level neurophysiology mimicking and exploratory programming methods commonly used in the machine consciousness field, the hierarchical Operational Architectonics (OA) framework of brain and mind functioning proposes an alternative conceptual-theoretical framework as a new direction in the area of model-driven machine (robot) consciousness engineering. The unified brain-mind theoretical OA model explicitly captures (though in an informal way) the basic essence of brain functional architecture, which indeed constitutes a theory of consciousness. The OA describes (...)
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  5. Piotr Boltuc (2009). The Philosophical Issue in Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):155-176.
    The truly philosophical issue in machine conscioiusness is whether machines can have 'hard consciounsess'. Criteria for hard consciousness are higher than for phenomenal consciousness, since the latter incorporates first-person functional consciousness.
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  6.  3
    Catherine Legg (2004). Review of Holland "Machine Consciousness". [REVIEW] Metapsychology Reviews Online 2004 (Sep).
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  7. William Y. Adams (2004). Machine Consciousness: Plausible Idea or Semantic Distortion? Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):46-56.
    I found the JCS issue on Machine Consciousness, Volume 10, No. 4-5 , frustrating and alienating. There seems to be a consensus building that consciousness is accessible to scientific scrutiny, so much so that it is already understood well enough to be modeled and even synthesized. I'm not so sure. It could be instead that the vocabulary of consciousness is being subtly redefined to be amenable to scientific investigation and explicit modeling. Such semantic revisionism is confusing (...)
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  8.  67
    Owen Holland & Russell B. Goodman (2003). Robots with Internal Models: A Route to Machine Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4):77-109.
    We are engineers, and our view of consciousness is shaped by an engineering ambition: we would like to build a conscious machine. We begin by acknowledging that we may be a little disadvantaged, in that consciousness studies do not form part of the engineering curriculum, and so we may be starting from a position of considerable ignorance as regards the study of consciousness itself. In practice, however, this may not set us back very far; almost a (...)
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  9.  42
    D. Gamez (2008). Progress in Machine Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):887-910.
    This paper is a review of the work that has been carried out on machine consciousness. A clear overview of this diverse field is achieved by breaking machine consciousness down into four different areas, which are used to understand its aims, discuss its relationship with other subjects and outline the work that has been carried out so far. The criticisms that have been made against machine consciousness are also covered, along with its potential benefits, (...)
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  10.  37
    Aaron Sloman (2010). An Alternative to Working on Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (1):1-18.
  11.  30
    Susan A. J. Stuart (2007). Machine Consciousness: Cognitive and Kinaesthetic Imagination. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):141-153.
    Machine consciousness exists already in organic systems and it is only a matter of time -- and some agreement -- before it will be realised in reverse-engineered organic systems and forward- engineered inorganic systems. The agreement must be over the preconditions that must first be met if the enterprise is to be successful, and it is these preconditions, for instance, being a socially-embedded, structurally-coupled and dynamic, goal-directed entity that organises its perceptual input and enacts its world through the (...)
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  12.  21
    Owen Holland (2007). A Strongly Embodied Approach to Machine Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):97-110.
    Over sixty years ago, Kenneth Craik noted that, if an organism (or an artificial agent) carried 'a small-scale model of external reality and of its own possible actions within its head', it could use the model to behave intelligently. This paper argues that the possible actions might best be represented by interactions between a model of reality and a model of the agent, and that, in such an arrangement, the internal model of the agent might be a transparent model of (...)
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  13.  44
    Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2009). Machine Consciousness: A Manifesto for Robotics. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):33-51.
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  14.  16
    Joel Parthemore & Blay Whitby (2013). What Makes Any Agent a Moral Agent? Reflections on Machine Consciousness and Moral Agency. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (2):105-129.
    In this paper, we take moral agency to be that context in which a particular agent can, appropriately, be held responsible for her actions and their consequences. In order to understand moral agency, we will discuss what it would take for an artifact to be a moral agent. For reasons that will become clear over the course of the paper, we take the artifactual question to be a useful way into discussion but ultimately misleading. We set out a number of (...)
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  15.  32
    Janusz A. Starzyk & Dilip K. Prasad (2011). A Computational Model of Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):255-281.
  16.  33
    Stan Franklin, Sidney D'Mello, Bernard J. Baars & Uma Ramamurthy (2009). Evolutionary Pressures for Perceptual Stability and Self as Guides to Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):99-110.
  17.  33
    Raúl Arrabales, Agapito Ledezma & Araceli Sanchis (2010). The Cognitive Development of Machine Consciousness Implementations. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (2):213-225.
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  18. Aaron Sloman (2010). Machine Consciousness: Response to Commentaries. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (1):75-116.
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  19.  30
    Raúl Arrabales, Agapito Ledezma & Araceli Sanchis (2009). Strategies for Measuring Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (2):193-201.
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  20.  25
    Igor Aleksander (2009). The Potential Impact of Machine Consciousness in Science and Engineering. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):1-9.
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  21.  27
    Owen Holland & Rod Goodman (2003). Robots With Internal Models A Route to Machine Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):4-5.
    We are engineers, and our view of consciousness is shaped by an engineering ambition: we would like to build a conscious machine. We begin by acknowledging that we may be a little disadvantaged, in that consciousness studies do not form part of the engineering curriculum, and so we may be starting from a position of considerable ignorance as regards the study of consciousness itself. In practice, however, this may not set us back very far; almost a (...)
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  22.  25
    Carlos Hernández, Ignacio López & Ricardo Sanz (2009). The Operative Mind: A Functional, Computational and Modeling Approach to Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):83-98.
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  23.  21
    Whitby Blay (2013). When is Any Agent a Moral Agent?: Reflections on Machine Consciousness and Moral Agency. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (1).
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  24.  34
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2009). Brain and Mind Operational Architectonics and Man-Made “MachineConsciousness. Cognitive Processing 10 (2):105-111.
    To build a true conscious robot requires that a robot’s “brain” be capable of supporting the phenomenal consciousness as human’s brain enjoys. Operational Architectonics framework through exploration of the temporal structure of information flow and inter-area interactions within the network of functional neuronal populations [by examining topographic sharp transition processes in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) on the millisecond scale] reveals and describes the EEG architecture which is analogous to the architecture of the phenomenal world. This suggests that the task (...)
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  25.  15
    J. C. Nyíri (1989). Wittgenstein and the Problem of Machine Consciousness. Grazer Philosophische Studien 33:375-394.
    For any given society, its particular technology of communication has far-reaching consequences, not merely as regards social organization, but on the epistemic level as well. Plato's name-theory of meaning represents the transition from the age of primary orality to that of literacy; Wittgenstein's use-theory of meaning stands for the transition from the age of literacy to that of a second orality (audiovisual communication, electronic information processing). On the basis of a use-theory of meaning the problem of machine consciousness, (...)
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  26.  10
    Peter Boltuc (2014). Haikonen's Philosophy of Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 6 (1):5-11.
    Peter Boltuc, Int. J. Mach. Conscious., 06, 5 (2014). DOI: 10.1142/S1793843014400022.
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  27.  17
    Klaus Raizer, André L. O. Paraense & Ricardo R. Gudwin (2012). A Cognitive Architecture with Incremental Levels of Machine Consciousness Inspired by Cognitive Neuroscience. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (02):335-352.
  28.  10
    J. C. Nyíri (1989). Wittgenstein and the Problem of Machine Consciousness. Grazer Philosophische Studien 33:375-394.
    For any given society, its particular technology of communication has far-reaching consequences, not merely as regards social organization, but on the epistemic level as well. Plato's name-theory of meaning represents the transition from the age of primary orality to that of literacy; Wittgenstein's use-theory of meaning stands for the transition from the age of literacy to that of a second orality (audiovisual communication, electronic information processing). On the basis of a use-theory of meaning the problem of machine consciousness, (...)
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  29.  8
    Raúl Arrabales (2014). Haikonen's View on Machine Consciousness: Back to the Engineering Stance. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 6 (1):1-4.
    Raúl Arrabales, Int. J. Mach. Conscious., 06, 1 (2014). DOI: 10.1142/S1793843014400010.
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  30.  14
    Pentti O. A. Haikonen (2009). Machine Consciousness: New Opportunities for Information Technology Industry. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (2):181-184.
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  31.  6
    J. C. Nyíri (1989). Wittgenstein and the Problem of Machine Consciousness. Grazer Philosophische Studien 33:375-394.
    For any given society, its particular technology of communication has far-reaching consequences, not merely as regards social organization, but on the epistemic level as well. Plato's name-theory of meaning represents the transition from the age of primary orality to that of literacy; Wittgenstein's use-theory of meaning stands for the transition from the age of literacy to that of a second orality (audiovisual communication, electronic information processing). On the basis of a use-theory of meaning the problem of machine consciousness, (...)
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  32.  9
    Pierre Bonzon (2011). Towards Machine Consciousness: Grounding Abstract Models as Π-Processes. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):1-17.
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  33.  5
    Pietro Perconti (2013). Two Kinds of Common Sense Knowledge (and a Constraint for Machine Consciousness Design). International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (1):95-101.
  34.  45
    Owen Holland (ed.) (2003). Machine Consciousness. Imprint Academic.
    In this collection of essays we hear from an international array of computer and brain scientists who are actively working from both the machine and human ends...
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  35. Owen Holland, Rob Knight & Richard Newcombe (2007). The Role of the Self Process in Embodied Machine Consciousness. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic 156-173.
  36. Ricardo Sanz, Ignacio López & Julita Bermejo-Alonso (2007). A Rationale and Vision for Machine Consciousness in Complex Controllers. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic 141-155.
     
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  37.  34
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1996). Consciousness and the Machine. Zygon 31 (2):235-52.
  38. John G. Taylor (2007). Through Machine Attention to Machine Consciousness. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic 24-47.
  39.  19
    Robert Clowes, Steve Torrance & Ron Chrisley (2007). Machine Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):7-14.
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  40. Igor L. Aleksander (2007). Machine Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell
  41.  31
    Piotr Boltuc (2012). The Engineering Thesis in Machine Consciousness. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 16 (2):187-207.
    I argue here that consciousness can be engineered. The claim that functional consciousness can be engineered has been persuasively put forth in regards to first-person functional consciousness; robots, for instance, can recognize colors, though there is still much debate about details of this sort of consciousness. Such consciousness has now become one of the meanings of the term phenomenal consciousness (e.g., as used by Franklin and Baars). Yet, we extend the argument beyond the tradition (...)
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  42.  58
    Igor L. Aleksander (2006). Machine Consciousness. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier
  43. Antonio Chella & Irene Macaluso (2007). Machine Consciousness in CiceRobot, A Museum Guide Robot. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), Ai and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. Aaai Press, Merlo Park, Ca
     
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  44. Steve Torrance & Ron Chrisley, Modelling Consciousness-Dependent Expertise in Machine Medical Moral Agents.
    It is suggested that some limitations of current designs for medical AI systems stem from the failure of those designs to address issues of artificial consciousness. Consciousness would appear to play a key role in the expertise, particularly the moral expertise, of human medical agents, including, for example, autonomous weighting of options in diagnosis; planning treatment; use of imaginative creativity to generate courses of action; sensorimotor flexibility and sensitivity; empathetic and morally appropriate responsiveness; and so on. Thus, it (...)
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  45. L. S. Coles (1993). Engineering Machine Consciousness. AI Expert 8:34-41.
     
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  46.  3
    Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2012). AGI and Machine Consciousness. In Pei Wang & Ben Goertzel (eds.), Theoretical Foundations of Artificial General Intelligence. Springer 263--282.
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  47. Igor Aleksander, Susan Stuart & Tom Ziemke (2008). Assessing Artificial Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. 1 The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti (...)
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  48.  39
    Nicholas Boltuc & Peter Boltuc (2007). Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI: An Early Conceptual Framework. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. AAAI Press, Merlo Park, CA
    We should eventually understand how exactly first person phenomenal consciousness is generated. When we do, we should be able to enginner one for robots. This is the engineering thesis in machine consciousness.
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  49.  18
    Rafal Rzepka & Kenji Araki (2007). Consciousness of Crowds–The Internet as Knowledge Source of Human Conscious Behavior and Machine Self-Understanding. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), Ai and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. Aaai Press, Merlo Park, Ca 127--128.
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  50. Igor Kononenko (2009). Natural and Machine Learning, Intelligence, and Consciousness. In Eva Zerovnik, Olga Markič & A. Ule (eds.), Philosophical Insights About Modern Science. Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
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