Search results for 'Madeline Harrison' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jonathan Harrison (1977). Geach on Harrison on Geach on God. Philosophy 52 (200):223 - 226.score: 120.0
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  2. Jonathan Harrison (1998). A Howler of Harrison'S. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):526.score: 120.0
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  3. Madeline Harrison (1963). A Life of St. Edward the Confessor in Early Fourteenth-Century Stained Glass at Fecamp, in Normandy. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 26 (1/2):22-37.score: 120.0
  4. Malcolm Finbow, Mike Harrison & Phil Jones (1995). Malcolm E. Finbow, Michael Harrison and Phillip Jones Reply. Bioessays 17 (8):745-745.score: 120.0
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  5. Austin Harrison (1926). Frederic Harrison. London, W. Heinemann.score: 120.0
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  6. E. Harrison (1903). Sitzler's Notice of Harrison's Theognis. The Classical Review 17 (09):470-.score: 120.0
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  7. Ross Harrison (2003). Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this major study of the foundations of modern political theory the eminent political philosopher T. R. Harrison explains, analyzes, and criticizes the work of Hobbes, Locke, and their contemporaries. He provides a full account of the turbulent historical background that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious content of this philosophy. The book explores such questions as the limits of political authority and the relation of the legitimacy of government to the will of its people in non-technical, accessible prose (...)
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  8. S. J. Harrison (2004). Apuleius: A Latin Sophist. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    This book is a response to the literary pleasures and scholarly problems of reading the texts of Apuleius, most famous for his novel Metamorphoses or Golden Ass. Living in second-century North Africa, Apuleius was more than an author of fiction; he was a consummate orator and professional intellectual, Platonist philosopher, extraordinary stylist, relentless self-promoter, and versatile author of a remarkably diverse body of work, much of which is lost to us. This book is written for those able to read Apuleius (...)
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  9. Steven Harrison (2008). The Shimmering World: Living Meditation. Sentient Publications.score: 60.0
    Steven Harrison's books have inspired many to examine their ideas about life and about spirituality in particular, and to come to a more direct perception of ...
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  10. Jonathan Harrison (1996). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Philosophy 71 (277):439 - 444.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  11. Helen Harrison (2013). Father Francis Murphy in Bradford and Liverpool. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (3):283.score: 60.0
    Harrison, Helen Adelaide's first bishop, Francis Murphy, was baptised in Navan, County Meath, Ireland, on 24 May 1795. His parents were Arthur Murphy and Bridget nee Flood. Baptismal records suggest his siblings included John Joseph (baptised 1797), Arthur (1801), Catherine (1805), John Joseph Michael (1806) and Christopher (1807). It is unlikely that all of these survived for long because by the time Francis Murphy was Bishop of Adelaide, he was writing to 'my sister' (Catherine, d 1856) and 'my brother' (...)
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  12. R. K. Harrison (ed.) (1992/2003). The Encyclopedia of Biblical Ethics. Testament Books.score: 60.0
    A comprehensive reference work for everyone concerned with the complicated moral issues of this world, this unique volume clearly communicates what Scripture teaches about the ethical dilemmas facing our society. Biological warfare, corporate responsibility, human rights, computer ethics, and much more are discussed by over fifty scholars who explain the moral guidelines in the Bible and historic Christian teachings. R.K. Harrison, author and editor of over thirty books on biblical studies, has brought together a valuable A to B treasury (...)
     
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  13. Hugh Upton & Ross Harrison (1996). Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):271.score: 60.0
    Democracy surrounds us like the air we breath, and is normally taken very much for granted. Across the world democracy has become accepted as an unquestionably good thing. Yet upon further examination the merits of democracy are both paradoxical and problematic, and the treasured values of liberty and equality can be used to argue both for and against it. In the historical section of the book, Ross Harrison clearly traces the history of democracy by examining the works of, amongst (...)
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  14. Gerald K. Harrison & Julia Tanner (2011). Better Not to Have Children. Think, 10(27), 113-121 (27):113-121.score: 30.0
    Most people take it for granted that it's morally permissible to have children. They may raise questions about the number of children it's responsible to have or whether it's permissible to reproduce when there's a strong risk of serious disability. But in general, having children is considered a good thing to do, something that's morally permissible in most cases (perhaps even obligatory).
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  15. Gerald K. Harrison (2009). Hooray! We're Not Morally Responsible! Think 8 (23):87-95.score: 30.0
  16. Gerald K. Harrison (2012). Antinatalism, Asymmetry, and an Ethic of Prima Facie Duties. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):94-103.score: 30.0
    Benatar’s central argument for antinatalism develops an asymmetry between the pain and pleasure in a potential life. I am going to present an alternative route to the antinatalist conclusion. I argue that duties require victims and that as a result there is no duty to create the pleasures contained within a prospective life but a duty not to create any of its sufferings. My argument can supplement Benatar’s, but it also enjoys some advantages: it achieves a better fit with our (...)
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  17. Jonathan Harrison (1957). Kant's Examples of the First Formulation of the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Quarterly 7 (26):50-62.score: 30.0
  18. Peter Harrison (2010). A Scientific Buddhism? Zygon 45 (4):861-869.score: 30.0
    This essay endorses the argument of Donald Lopez's Buddhism and Science and shows how the general thesis of the book is consonant with other historical work on the “discovery” of Buddhism and on the emergence of Western conceptions of religion. It asks whether one of the key claims of Buddhism and Science—that Buddhism pays a price for its flirtation with the modern sciences—might be applicable to science-and-religion discussions more generally.
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  19. P. Harrison (1991). Do Animals Feel Pain? Philosophy 66 (January):25-40.score: 30.0
  20. Gerald K. Harrison (2013). The Moral Supervenience Thesis is Not a Conceptual Truth. Analysis 73 (1):62-68.score: 30.0
    Virtually everyone takes the moral supervenience thesis to be a basic conceptual truth about morality. As a result, if a metaethical theory has difficulties respecting or adequately explaining the supervenience relationship it is deemed to be in big trouble. However, the moral supervenience thesis is a not a conceptual truth (though it may be true) and as such it is not a problem if a metaethical theory cannot respect or explain it.
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  21. Jonathan Harrison (2008). The Vagaries of Vegetarianism. Ratio 21 (3):286-299.score: 30.0
    The following was meant to be a 'fun paper', which the author's honesty and natural seriousness of mind prevented from coming off well. Its main theme is that it is not wrong to eat meat provided the animals eaten are painlessly killed or – usually in the case of human animals – already dead. In the course of his remarks the author touches on: the bearing of affluence on vegetarianism; animal rights; child eating; treating animals as ends and with due (...)
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  22. Peter Harrison (1992). Descartes on Animals. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):219-227.score: 30.0
    Did Descartes deny that animals can feel? While it has generally been assumed that he did, there has been some confusion over the fact that Descartes concedes to animals both sensations and passions'. John Cottingham, for example, has argued that while Descartes did insist that animals were automata, denying them thought and "self"-consciousness, none of these assertions entail the conclusion that animals do not feel. This paper examines both Cottingham's arguments and the relevant sections of Descartes' writings, concluding that Descartes (...)
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  23. Victoria S. Harrison (2007). Metaphor, Religious Language, and Religious Experience. Sophia 46 (2):127-145.score: 30.0
    Is it possible to talk about God without either misrepresentation or failing to assert anything of significance? The article begins by reviewing how, in attempting to answer this question, traditional theories of religious language have failed to sidestep both potential pitfalls adequately. After arguing that recently developed theories of metaphor seem better able to shed light on the nature of religious language, it considers the claim that huge areas of our language and, consequently, of our experience are shaped by metaphors. (...)
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  24. Ross Harrison (2003). Nineteenth-Century British Philosophers. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):715 – 726.score: 30.0
  25. J. E. J. Altham & Ross Harrison (eds.) (1995). World, Mind, and Ethics: Essays on the Ethical Philosophy of Bernard Williams. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Bernard Williams is one of the most influential figures in recent ethical theory, where he has set a considerable part of the current agenda. In this collection, a distinguished international team of philosophers who have been stimulated by Williams' work give new responses to it. The topics covered include equality, consistency, comparisons between science and ethics, integrity, moral reasons, the moral system, and moral knowledge. Williams himself then provides a substantial reply, which in turn shows both the current directions of (...)
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  26. Jonathan Harrison (1984). The Incorrigibility of the Cogito. Mind 93 (July):321-335.score: 30.0
  27. Victoria S. Harrison, Theorizing Religious Diversity in a Multicultural World.score: 30.0
    This paper examines a variety of intellectual responses to the religious and philosophical issues raised by religious plurality. While the specific questions raised by religious plurality differ across traditions, the more general problem that faces all religious intellectuals is how to provide a compelling theoretical account of the relationship between the various religions of the world. The paper briefly reviews religious exclusivism and inclusivism, before focusing upon theories of religious pluralism. After clarifying the distinction between religious pluralism and relativism about (...)
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  28. Jonathan Harrison (1999). The Impossibility of ‘Possible’ Worlds. Philosophy 74 (1):5-28.score: 30.0
    The gist of these objections to the possible world account of necessity is that, for it to be true, ‘possible’ would have to be a name for an attribute. But to say that something is possible is not to describe it, but to say that there could be such a thing. And possibilities are not classes of entities. Possible worlds have been described as ways, but a way of getting to London from Cambridge is not an entity, and that there (...)
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  29. Victoria S. Harrison (2007). Feminist Philosophy of Religion and the Problem of Epistemic Privilege. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):685–696.score: 30.0
  30. Craig Harrison (1972). On the Structure of Space-Time. Synthese 24 (1-2):180 - 194.score: 30.0
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  31. Gerald K. Harrison (2010). A Challenge for Soft Line Replies to Manipulation Cases. Philosophia 38 (3):555-568.score: 30.0
    Cases involving certain kinds of manipulation seem to challenge compatibilism about responsibility-grounding free will. To deal with such cases many compatibilists give what has become known as a ‘soft line’ reply. In this paper I present a challenge to the soft line reply. I argue that any relevant case involving manipulation—and to which a compatibilist might wish to give a soft line reply—can be transformed into one supporting a degree of moral responsibility through the addition of libertarian elements (such as (...)
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  32. K. Kong Wan, Jason Bradshaw, Colin Trueman & F. E. Harrison (1998). Classical Systems, Standard Quantum Systems, and Mixed Quantum Systems in Hilbert Space. Foundations of Physics 28 (12):1739-1783.score: 30.0
    Traditionally, there has been a clear distinction between classical systems and quantum systems, particularly in the mathematical theories used to describe them. In our recent work on macroscopic quantum systems, this distinction has become blurred, making a unified mathematical formulation desirable, so as to show up both the similarities and the fundamental differences between quantum and classical systems. This paper serves this purpose, with explicit formulations and a number of examples in the form of superconducting circuit systems. We introduce three (...)
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  33. Jonathan Harrison (1956). Some Comments on Professor Firth's Ideal Observer Theory. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 17 (2):256-262.score: 30.0
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  34. Paul M. Harrison (1978). Buddhanusmrti in the Pratyutpanna-Buddha-Sammukhavasthita-Samadhi-Sutra. Journal of Indian Philosophy 6 (1):35-57.score: 30.0
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  35. Gerald K. Harrison (2006). Frankfurt-Style Cases and Improbable Alternative Possibilities. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):399 - 406.score: 30.0
    It has been argued that a successful counterexample to the principle of alternative possibilities must rule out any possibility of the agent making an alternative decision right up to the moment of choice. This paper challenges that assumption. Distinguishing between an ability and an opportunity, this paper presents a Frankfurt-style case in which there is an alternative possibility, but one it is highly improbable that the agent will access. In such a case the agent has only the opportunity, not the (...)
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  36. Ross Harrison (ed.) (1979). Rational Action: Studies in Philosophy and Social Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This volume is concerned with the concept of rationality and the interrelations between rationality, belief and desire in the explanation and evaluation of ...
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  37. Gerald K. Harrison (2008). Modest Libertarianism and Clandestine Control. Dialectica 62 (4):495-507.score: 30.0
    Cases involving clandestine manipulation pose a significant challenge to compatibilist conceptions of free will. But compatibilists often argue that they are not alone and that modest libertarian conceptions of free will are also susceptible to the problem. I take issue with this claim. I argue that agent-causal libertarian views are not susceptible to the problem. I then argue that the compatibilist cannot cite a relevant difference between agent-causal libertarian views and modest libertarian views. Therefore from a compatibilist's perspective modest libertarian (...)
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  38. Glenn W. Harrison (2008). Neuroeconomics: A Critical Reconsideration. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):303-344.score: 30.0
    Understanding more about how the brain functions should help us understand economic behaviour. But some would have us believe that it has done this already, and that insights from neuroscience have already provided insights in economics that we would not otherwise have. Much of this is just academic marketing hype, and to get down to substantive issues we need to identify that fluff for what it is. After we clear away the distractions, what is left? The answer is that a (...)
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  39. Victoria S. Harrison (2008). Internal Realism, Religious Pluralism and Ontology. Philosophia 36 (1):97-110.score: 30.0
    Internalist pluralism is an attractive and elegant theory. However, there are two apparently powerful objections to this approach that prevent its widespread adoption. According to the first objection, the resulting analysis of religious belief systems is intrinsically atheistic; while according to the second objection, the analysis is unsatisfactory because it allows religious objects simply to be defined into existence. In this article, I demonstrate that an adherent of internalist pluralism can deflect both of these objections, and in the course of (...)
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  40. Victoria Harrison (2010). Philosophy of Religion, Fictionalism, and Religious Diversity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):43-58.score: 30.0
    Until recently philosophy of religion has been almost exclusively focused upon the analysis of western religious ideas. The central concern of the discipline has been the concept God , as that concept has been understood within Judaeo-Christianity. However, this narrow remit threatens to render philosophy of religion irrelevant today. To avoid this philosophy of religion should become a genuinely multicultural discipline. But how, if at all, can philosophy of religion rise to this challenge? The paper considers fictionalism about religious discourse (...)
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  41. Jonathan Harrison (1958). The Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Quarterly 8 (33):360-364.score: 30.0
    In this paper the author considers a number of objections to the views he expressed in "kant's examples of the first formulation of the categorical imperative" ("the philosophical quarterly", Volume 7, Number 26, January, 1973) by professor kemp in "kant's examples of the categorical imperative" ("the philosophical quarterly", Volume 8, Number 30, January, 1957) and does what he can to reply to them.
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  42. Victoria S. Harrison (2006). Internal Realism and the Problem of Religious Diversity. Philosophia 34 (3):287-301.score: 30.0
    This article applies Hilary Putnam’s theory of internal realism to the issue of religious plurality. The result of this application – ‘internalist pluralism’ – constitutes a paradigm shift within the Philosophy of Religion. Moreover, internalist pluralism succeeds in avoiding the major difficulties faced by John Hick’s famous theory of religious pluralism, which views God, or ‘the Real,’ as the noumenon lying behind diverse religious phenomena. In side-stepping the difficulties besetting Hick’s revolutionary Kantian approach, without succumbing to William Alston’s critique of (...)
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  43. Jonathan Harrison (2004). The Logical Function of ‘That’, or Truth, Propositions and Sentences. Philosophy 79 (1):67-96.score: 30.0
    (i) It is propositions, not sentences, that are true or false. It is true ‘Dogs bark’ does not make sense. It is true that dogs bark does. (ii) and (iii) Davidson wrong about ‘that’. (iv) The difference between ‘implies’ and ‘if ... then ...’. (v), (vi), (vii) and (viii) Russell, not Quine, right about the subject matter of logic. (ix) The objectual and substitutional interpretations of quantifiers compatible. (x), (xi), (xii), (xiii), (xiv), (xv) and (xvi) Implications for well-known theories of (...)
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  44. Peter Harrison (1989). Theodicy and Animal Pain. Philosophy 64 (247):79 - 92.score: 30.0
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  45. Geoffrey Harrison (1976). Relativism and Tolerance. Ethics 86 (2):122-135.score: 30.0
  46. Peter Harrison (2001). Hume's Abject Failure: The Argument Against Miracles (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (4):592-594.score: 30.0
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  47. Victoria S. Harrison (1999). Personal Identity and Integration: Von Balthasar's Phenomenology of Human Holiness. Heythrop Journal 40 (4):424–437.score: 30.0
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  48. Craig Harrison (1996). The Three Arrows of Zeno. Synthese 107 (2):271 - 292.score: 30.0
    We explore the better known paradoxes of Zeno including modern variants based on infinite processes, from the point of view of standard, classical analysis, from which there is still much to learn (especially concerning the paradox of division), and then from the viewpoints of non-standard and non-classical analysis (the logic of the latter being intuitionist).The standard, classical or Cantorian notion of the continuum, modeled on the real number line, is well known, as is the definition of motion as the time (...)
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  49. Jonathan Harrison (1982). Mackie's Moral 'Scepticism'. Philosophy 57 (220):173 - 191.score: 30.0
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  50. Hyman Gross & Ross Harrison, Causation Outside the Law.score: 30.0
    In their important book, Causation in the Law, H. L. A. Hart and Tony Honore argue that causation in the law is based on causation outside the law, that the causal principles the courts rely on to determine legal responsibility are based on distinctions exercised in ordinary causal judgments. A distinction that particularly concerns them is one that divides factors that are necessary or sine qua non for an effect into those that count as causes for purposes of legal responsibility (...)
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