Search results for 'Madeline Harrison' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Madeline Harrison (1963). A Life of St. Edward the Confessor in Early Fourteenth-Century Stained Glass at Fecamp, in Normandy. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 26 (1/2):22-37.
  2. Jonathan Harrison (2009). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus: Harrison How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Think 8 (21):7-12.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  3.  9
    Jonathan Harrison (1998). A Howler of Harrison'S. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):526.
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  4.  5
    Jonathan Harrison (1977). Geach on Harrison on Geach on God. Philosophy 52 (200):223 - 226.
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  5.  1
    Malcolm Finbow, Mike Harrison & Phil Jones (1995). Malcolm E. Finbow, Michael Harrison and Phillip Jones Reply. Bioessays 17 (8):745-745.
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  6. Isidore Auguste M. Comte & Frederic Harrison (1886). The Positivist Library of August Comte, Tr. And Ed. By F. Harrison.
     
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  7. Ross Harrison (1996). Cambridge Philosophers VI: Henry Sidgwick: Ross Harrison. Philosophy 71 (277):423-438.
    The philosophy department in Edinburgh is in David Hume tower; the philosophy faculty at Cambridge is in Sidgwick Avenue. In one way, no competition. Everybody has heard of Hume, whereas even the anybody who's anybody may not have heard of Sidgwick. Yet in another way, Sidgwick wins this arcane contest. For if David Hume, contradicting the Humean theory of personal identity, were to return to Edinburgh, he would not recognize the tower. Whereas, if someone with more success in rearousing spirits (...)
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  8. Austin Harrison (1926). Frederic Harrison. London, W. Heinemann.
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  9. B. Harrison (1983). HARRISON, J. "Hume's Theory of Justice". [REVIEW] Mind 92:604.
     
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  10. Geoffrey Harrison (1982). J. Harrison, "Hume's Theory of Justice". [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 32 (29):384.
     
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  11. Jonathan Harrison (1978). Malt Does More Than Peter Can or on Behalf of the Damned: Jonathan Harrison. Religious Studies 14 (4):525-537.
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  12. Frederic Harrison (1872). On the Supposed Necessity of Certain Metaphysical Problems [a Paper by F. Harrison. No. 25 of a Ser.].
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  13. E. Harrison (1903). Sitzler's Notice of Harrison's Theognis. The Classical Review 17 (09):470-.
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  14. Frederic Harrison (1911). Autobiographic Memoirs. Macmillan and Co., Limited.
     
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  15.  29
    Ross Harrison (2003). Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this major study of the foundations of modern political theory the eminent political philosopher T. R. Harrison explains, analyzes, and criticizes the work of Hobbes, Locke, and their contemporaries. He provides a full account of the turbulent historical background that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious content of this philosophy. The book explores such questions as the limits of political authority and the relation of the legitimacy of government to the will of its people in non-technical, accessible prose (...)
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  16.  1
    Hugh Upton & Ross Harrison (1996). Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):271.
    Democracy surrounds us like the air we breath, and is normally taken very much for granted. Across the world democracy has become accepted as an unquestionably good thing. Yet upon further examination the merits of democracy are both paradoxical and problematic, and the treasured values of liberty and equality can be used to argue both for and against it. In the historical section of the book, Ross Harrison clearly traces the history of democracy by examining the works of, amongst (...)
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  17. Simon Harrison (2006). Augustine's Way Into the Will: The Theological and Philosophical Significance of de Libero Arbitrio. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Augustine's dialogue De libero arbitrio is, with his Confessions and City of God, one of his most important and widely read works. It contains one of the earliest accounts of the concept of 'free will' in the history of philosophy. Composed during a key period in Augustine's early career, between his conversion to Christianity and his ordination as a bishop, it has often been viewed as a an incoherent mixture of his 'early' and 'late' thinking. Simon Harrison offers an (...)
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  18. Carol Harrison (2006). Rethinking Augustine's Early Theology. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Carol Harrison counters the assumption that Augustine of Hippo's theology underwent a revolutionary transformation around the time he was consecrated Bishop in 396. Instead, she argues that there is a fundamental continuity in his thought and practice from the moment of his conversion in 386. The book thereby challenges the general scholarly trend to begin reading Augustine with his Confessions, which were begun ten years after his conversion, and refocuses attention on his earlier works, which undergird his whole theological (...)
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  19.  4
    Helen Harrison (2013). Father Francis Murphy in Bradford and Liverpool. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (3):283.
    Harrison, Helen Adelaide's first bishop, Francis Murphy, was baptised in Navan, County Meath, Ireland, on 24 May 1795. His parents were Arthur Murphy and Bridget nee Flood. Baptismal records suggest his siblings included John Joseph, Arthur, Catherine, John Joseph Michael and Christopher. It is unlikely that all of these survived for long because by the time Francis Murphy was Bishop of Adelaide, he was writing to 'my sister' and 'my brother'.
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  20.  6
    Jonathan Harrison (1996). How Ludwig Became a Homunculus. Philosophy 71 (277):439 - 444.
    Jonathan Harrison teases our minds with two short stories ….
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  21.  1
    Charles Harrison (1989). On the Surface of Painting. Critical Inquiry 15 (2):292-336.
    Lucas van Valckenborch’s Winter Landscape hangs in the Kinsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. It was painted four hundred years ago as one of a set of the four seasons. Measured by sales of reproductions, it is one of the most popular paintings in the museum, though it is by no means the most distinguished example of the genre to which it belongs. The picture is a snow scene. In the long series of represented planed that recede from foreground to horizon, fallen (...)
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  22. Ross Harrison (2002). Democracy. Routledge.
    Democracy surrounds us like the air we breath, and is normally taken very much for granted. Across the world democracy has become accepted as an unquestionably good thing. Yet upon further examination the merits of democracy are both paradoxical and problematic, and the treasured values of liberty and equality can be used to argue both for and against it. In the historical section of the book, Ross Harrison clearly traces the history of democracy by examining the works of, amongst (...)
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  23. Ross Harrison (2002). Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this major 2003 study of the foundations of modern political theory the eminent political philosopher Ross Harrison explains, analyzes, and criticizes the work of Hobbes, Locke, and their contemporaries. He provides a full account of the turbulent historical background that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious content of this philosophy. The book explores such questions as the limits of political authority and the relation of the legitimacy of government to the will of its people in non-technical, accessible prose (...)
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  24. Ross Harrison (2004). Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this major 2003 study of the foundations of modern political theory the eminent political philosopher Ross Harrison explains, analyzes, and criticizes the work of Hobbes, Locke, and their contemporaries. He provides a full account of the turbulent historical background that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious content of this philosophy. The book explores such questions as the limits of political authority and the relation of the legitimacy of government to the will of its people in non-technical, accessible prose (...)
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  25. Ross Harrison (2012). Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece: An Examination of Seventeenth-Century Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this major 2003 study of the foundations of modern political theory the eminent political philosopher Ross Harrison explains, analyzes, and criticizes the work of Hobbes, Locke, and their contemporaries. He provides a full account of the turbulent historical background that shaped the political, intellectual, and religious content of this philosophy. The book explores such questions as the limits of political authority and the relation of the legitimacy of government to the will of its people in non-technical, accessible prose (...)
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  26. Robert Pogue Harrison (2014). Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age. University of Chicago Press.
    How old are you? The more thought you bring to bear on the question, the harder it is to answer. For we age simultaneously in different ways: biologically, psychologically, socially. And we age within the larger framework of a culture, in the midst of a history that predates us and will outlast us. Looked at through that lens, many aspects of late modernity would suggest that we are older than ever, but Robert Pogue Harrison argues that we are also (...)
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  27. Carol Harrison (2008). Rethinking Augustine's Early Theology: An Argument for Continuity. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Carol Harrison counters the assumption that Augustine of Hippo's theology underwent a revolutionary transformation around the time he was consecrated Bishop in 396. Instead, she argues that there is a fundamental continuity in his thought and practice from the moment of his conversion in 386. The book thereby challenges the general scholarly trend to begin reading Augustine with his Confessions, which were begun ten years after his conversion, and refocuses attention on his earlier works, which undergird his whole theological (...)
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  28. Kelby Harrison (2013). Sexual Deceit: The Ethics of Passing. Lexington Books.
    Using the methodologies and insights of queer theory, narrative theory and analytic philosophy, Sexual Deceit helps us to understand the issues of passing and to evaluate it from a moral point of view. Noting the importance of time and place in discussing this issue, Kelby Harrison combines the insights, key concepts, and important arguments in both traditional philosophy and queer theory in developing an ethical theory called “Gayness as Practical Identity.”.
     
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  29. Kelby Harrison (2015). Sexual Deceit: The Ethics of Passing. Lexington Books.
    Using the methodologies and insights of queer theory, narrative theory and analytic philosophy, Sexual Deceit helps us to understand the issues of passing and to evaluate it from a moral point of view. Noting the importance of time and place in discussing this issue, Kelby Harrison combines the insights, key concepts, and important arguments in both traditional philosophy and queer theory in developing an ethical theory called “Gayness as Practical Identity.”.
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  30. R. K. Harrison (ed.) (1992/2003). The Encyclopedia of Biblical Ethics. Testament Books.
    A comprehensive reference work for everyone concerned with the complicated moral issues of this world, this unique volume clearly communicates what Scripture teaches about the ethical dilemmas facing our society. Biological warfare, corporate responsibility, human rights, computer ethics, and much more are discussed by over fifty scholars who explain the moral guidelines in the Bible and historic Christian teachings. R.K. Harrison, author and editor of over thirty books on biblical studies, has brought together a valuable A to B treasury (...)
     
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  31. Robert P. Harrison (1986). The Italian Silence. Critical Inquiry 13 (1):81-99.
    During the latter half of the thirteenth century there arose around Tuscany a strange and unprecedented poetry, erudite, abstract, and arrogantly intellectual. It sang beyond courtly conventions about the wonders of the rational universe whose complex secrets the new speculative sciences were eagerly systematizing. Appropriating the language of natural philosophy, Aristotelian psychology, and even theology, love poetry developed a new theoretical understanding of its enterprise which allowed it to redefine love as spiritualized search for knowledge. This intellectualization of erotic desire (...)
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  32.  4
    Steven Harrison (2008). The Shimmering World: Living Meditation. Sentient Publications.
    Steven Harrison's books have inspired many to examine their ideas about life and about spirituality in particular, and to come to a more direct perception of ...
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  33. Bernard Harrison (2014). What is Fiction For?: Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press.
    How can literature, which consists of nothing more than the description of imaginary events and situations, offer any insight into the workings of "human reality" or "the human condition"? Can mere words illuminate something that we call "reality"? Bernard Harrison answers these questions in this profoundly original work that seeks to re-enfranchise reality in the realms of art and discourse. In an ambitious account of the relationship between literature and cognition, he seeks to show how literary fiction, by deploying (...)
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  34. Bernard Harrison (2014). What is Fiction For?: Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press.
    How can literature, which consists of nothing more than the description of imaginary events and situations, offer any insight into the workings of "human reality" or "the human condition"? Can mere words illuminate something that we call "reality"? Bernard Harrison answers these questions in this profoundly original work that seeks to re-enfranchise reality in the realms of art and discourse. In an ambitious account of the relationship between literature and cognition, he seeks to show how literary fiction, by deploying (...)
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  35. Bernard Harrison (2014). What is Fiction For?: Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press.
    How can literature, which consists of nothing more than the description of imaginary events and situations, offer any insight into the workings of "human reality" or "the human condition"? Can mere words illuminate something that we call "reality"? Bernard Harrison answers these questions in this profoundly original work that seeks to re-enfranchise reality in the realms of art and discourse. In an ambitious account of the relationship between literature and cognition, he seeks to show how literary fiction, by deploying (...)
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  36.  36
    Glenn W. Harrison (2008). Neuroeconomics: A Critical Reconsideration. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):303-344.
    Understanding more about how the brain functions should help us understand economic behaviour. But some would have us believe that it has done this already, and that insights from neuroscience have already provided insights in economics that we would not otherwise have. Much of this is just academic marketing hype, and to get down to substantive issues we need to identify that fluff for what it is. After we clear away the distractions, what is left? The answer is that a (...)
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  37. G. Friedman & W. J. Harrison (1960). Re-Evaluation of Modern Societies. Diogenes 8 (31):56-67.
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  38. Peter Harrison (2011). Adam Smith, Natural Theology, and the Natural Sciences. In Paul Oslington (ed.), Adam Smith as Theologian. Routledge
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  39.  15
    Jeffrey S. Harrison & Andrew C. Wicks (2013). Stakeholder Theory, Value, and Firm Performance. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):97-124.
    This paper argues that the notion of value has been overly simplified and narrowed to focus on economic returns. Stakeholder theory provides an appropriate lens for considering a more complex perspective of the value that stakeholders seek as well as new ways to measure it. We develop a four-factor perspective for defining value that includes, but extends beyond, the economic value stakeholders seek. To highlight its distinctiveness, we compare this perspective to three other popular performance perspectives. Recommendations are made regarding (...)
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  40. Gerald K. Harrison & Julia Tanner (2011). Better Not to Have Children. Think, 10(27), 113-121 (27):113-121.
    Most people take it for granted that it's morally permissible to have children. They may raise questions about the number of children it's responsible to have or whether it's permissible to reproduce when there's a strong risk of serious disability. But in general, having children is considered a good thing to do, something that's morally permissible in most cases (perhaps even obligatory).
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  41. Andrew Harrison (1987). Philosophy And The Visual Arts. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
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  42. Peter Harrison (2010). A Scientific Buddhism? Zygon 45 (4):861-869.
    This essay endorses the argument of Donald Lopez's Buddhism and Science and shows how the general thesis of the book is consonant with other historical work on the “discovery” of Buddhism and on the emergence of Western conceptions of religion. It asks whether one of the key claims of Buddhism and Science—that Buddhism pays a price for its flirtation with the modern sciences—might be applicable to science-and-religion discussions more generally.
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  43.  30
    Glenn W. Harrison (2008). Neuroeconomics: A Rejoinder. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):533-544.
    Nobody in this debate questions the point that neuroeconomics remains full of potential, and little else as yet. If so, that really is progress of sorts. I was getting afraid that we would have to open nominations for the Captain Ahab Award for obsessive work on the promotion of neuroeconomics.
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  44.  2
    Jeffrey S. Harrison & Joseph E. Coombs (2012). The Moderating Effects From Corporate Governance Characteristics on the Relationship Between Available Slack and Community-Based Firm Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):409-422.
    Recent perspectives on community investments suggest that they are opportunities for firms to create value for shareholders and other stakeholders. However, many corporate managers are still influenced by a widely held belief that such investments erode profits and are therefore unjustifiable from an agency perspective. In this paper, we refine and test theory regarding countervailing forces that influence community-based firm performance. We hypothesize that high levels of available slack will be associated with higher community-based performance, but that this relationship will (...)
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  45. Gerald K. Harrison (2013). The Moral Supervenience Thesis is Not a Conceptual Truth. Analysis 73 (1):62-68.
    Virtually everyone takes the moral supervenience thesis to be a basic conceptual truth about morality. As a result, if a metaethical theory has difficulties respecting or adequately explaining the supervenience relationship it is deemed to be in big trouble. However, the moral supervenience thesis is a not a conceptual truth (though it may be true) and as such it is not a problem if a metaethical theory cannot respect or explain it.
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  46.  17
    Glenn Harrison & Don Ross (2010). The Methodologies of Neuroeconomics. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):185-196.
    We critically review the methodological practices of two research programs which are jointly called?neuroeconomics?. We defend the first of these, termed?neurocellular economics? by Ross, from an attack on its relevance by Gul and Pesendorfer. This attack arbitrarily singles out some but not all processing variables as unimportant to economics, is insensitive to the realities of empirical theory testing, and ignores the central importance to economics of?ecological rationality?. GP ironically share this last attitude with advocates of?behavioral economics in the scanner?, the (...)
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  47.  76
    A. Harrison, A. M. Al-Saadi, A. S. Al-Kaabi, M. R. Al-Kaabi, S. S. Al-Bedwawi, S. O. Al-Kaabi & S. B. Al-Neaimi (1997). Should Doctors Inform Terminally Ill Patients? The Opinions of Nationals and Doctors in the United Arab Emirates. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):101-107.
    OBJECTIVES: To study the opinions of nationals (Emiratis) and doctors practising in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with regard to informing terminally ill patients. DESIGN: Structured questionnaires administered during January 1995. SETTING: The UAE, a federation of small, rich, developing Arabian Gulf states. PARTICIPANTS: Convenience samples of 100 Emiratis (minimum age 15 years) and of 50 doctors practising in government hospitals and clinics. RESULTS: Doctors emerged as consistently less in favour of informing than the Emiratis were, whether the patient was (...)
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  48. Gerald K. Harrison (2012). Antinatalism, Asymmetry, and an Ethic of Prima Facie Duties. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):94-103.
    Benatar’s central argument for antinatalism develops an asymmetry between the pain and pleasure in a potential life. I am going to present an alternative route to the antinatalist conclusion. I argue that duties require victims and that as a result there is no duty to create the pleasures contained within a prospective life but a duty not to create any of its sufferings. My argument can supplement Benatar’s, but it also enjoys some advantages: it achieves a better fit with our (...)
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  49.  57
    Victoria Harrison (2010). Philosophy of Religion, Fictionalism, and Religious Diversity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):43-58.
    Until recently philosophy of religion has been almost exclusively focused upon the analysis of western religious ideas. The central concern of the discipline has been the concept God , as that concept has been understood within Judaeo-Christianity. However, this narrow remit threatens to render philosophy of religion irrelevant today. To avoid this philosophy of religion should become a genuinely multicultural discipline. But how, if at all, can philosophy of religion rise to this challenge? The paper considers fictionalism about religious discourse (...)
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  50.  14
    Charles Taliaferro, Victoria Harrison & Stewart Goetz (eds.) (2012). The Routledge Companion to Theism. Routledge.
    The five parts of the volume indicate its inclusive scope: I. What is Theism?; II. Theism and Inquiry; III. Theism and the Socio-Political Realm; IV. Theism and Culture; V. Theism as a Way of Life.
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