Search results for 'Mads Qvortrup' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mads H. Qvortrup (1999). A.V. Dicey: The Referendum as the People's Veto. History of Political Thought 20 (3):531-546.score: 240.0
    Referenda have traditionally been anathema to Liberal theorists. On the basis of previously unpublished material it is suggested that the English constitutional theorist Albert Venn Dicey succeeded in developing an argument for a limited use of the referendum within the Liberal tradition. It is argued that Dicey's theory of the referendum can be seen as a part of a comprehensive theory of democracy which included considerations on political education. Dicey's theory is not only one of the few examples of a (...)
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  2. Mads Qvortrup (2003). The Political Philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau: The Impossibility of Reason. Manchester University Press.score: 240.0
    This exciting new text presents the first overview of Jean Jacques Rousseau's work from a political science perspective. Was Rousseau--the great theorist of the French Revolution--really a conservative? This original study argues that the he was a constitutionalist much closer to Madison, Montesquieu, and Locke than to revolutionaries. Outlining his profound opposition to Godless materialism and revolutionary change, this book finds parallels between Rousseau and Burke, as well as showing how Rousseau developed the first modern theory of nationalism. The book (...)
     
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  3. Lars Qvortrup (1996). Scandinavian Human-Centred Systems Design: Theoretical Reflections and Challenges. [REVIEW] AI and Society 10 (2):164-180.score: 30.0
    Currently there is a clear trend towards questioning the traditional sovereign human self which for two hundred years has had an undisputed central status within European culture and philosophy. This challenges the tradition of anthropocentrism which in a Scandinavian computer science context has had two theoretical foundations: the workoriented design theory represented by the Scandinavian participatory design philosophy, and the idea of the computer to a rather passive medium for human communication. The process, reducing the computer to a rather passive (...)
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  4. Lars Qvortrup (2011). Skoleudvikling og skoleledelse: Hvorfor og hvordan? Paideia 1:17-25.score: 30.0
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  5. Stephen Dobson, Ole Hansen, Thomas Nordahl & Lars Qvortrup (2011). Hvordan reducerer vi frafaldet i uddannelsessystemet? Paideia 2:4-7.score: 30.0
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  6. Stephen Dobson, Lars Qvortrup, Ole Hansen & Thomas Nordahl (2011). Innledning: Paideia. Paideia 1:4-5.score: 30.0
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  7. Stephen Dobson, Ole Hansen, Thomas Nordahl, Anita Norlund, Bengt Persson & Lars Qvortrup (2012). Kampen om lærer-og pædagogprofessionen. Paideia 3:4-7.score: 30.0
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  8. Thomas Nordahl & Lars Qvortrup (2012). Kvalitet i dagtilbudet–hva sier barna? Paideia: Tidsskrift for Professionel Pædagogisk Praksis 4:7-18.score: 30.0
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  9. Lars Qvortrup (2012). Læreruddannelsens Lærebøger: Den Læringspsykologiske Og den Undervisningskommunikative Position. Paideia 3:39-53.score: 30.0
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  10. Lars Qvortrup (2011). The Class. Paideia 2:62-64.score: 30.0
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  11. Yongbiao Xue & Gwyneth Ingram (1993). What the Papers Say: Divergence in the Role of MADS Box Genes in the Determination of Floral Organ Identity. Bioessays 15 (10):691-693.score: 15.0
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  12. Andrew Russo (2011). Why It Doesn't Matter I'm Not Insane: Descartes's Madness Doubt in Focus. Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):157-165.score: 8.0
    Harry Frankfurt has argued that Descartes’s madness doubt in the First Meditation is importantly different from his dreaming doubt. The madness doubt does not provide a reason for doubting the senses since were the meditator to suppose he was mad his ability to successfully complete the philosophical investigation he sets for himself in the first few pages of the Meditations would be undermined. I argue that Frankfurt’s interpretation of Descartes’s madness doubt is mistaken and that it should be understood as (...)
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  13. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2004). Was Jesus Mad, Bad, or God? . . . Or Merely Mistaken? Faith and Philosophy 21 (4):456-479.score: 8.0
    Reprinted in Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology, Volume 1: Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement, Oxford 2009, ed. Michael Rea. A popular argument for the divinity of Jesus goes like this. Jesus claimed to be divine, but if his claim was false, then either he was insane (mad) or lying (bad), both of which are very unlikely; so, he was divine. I present two objections to this argument. The first, the dwindling probabilities objection, contends that even if we make generous probability assignments (...)
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  14. Emily S. Lee (2010). Madness and Judiciousness: A Phenomenological Reading of a Black Woman’s Encounter with a Saleschild. In Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press.score: 8.0
    Patricia Williams in her book, The Alchemy of Race and Rights, describes being denied entrance in the middle of the afternoon by a “saleschild.” Utilizing the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, this article explores their interaction phenomenologically. This small interaction of seemingly simple misunderstanding represents a limit condition in Merleau-Ponty’s analysis. His phenomenological framework does not explain the chasm between the “saleschild” and Williams, that in a sense they do not participate in the same world. This interaction between the “saleschild” and (...)
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  15. Simon J. Evnine (1989). Understanding Madness? Ratio 2 (1):1-18.score: 8.0
    The paper contrasts two ways of understanding the apparently strange assertions of mad persons, finds them both problematic, and proposes an alternative. The first approach, exemplified by R.D. Laing, is to suppose that the beliefs of the mad person are ordinary but expressed in terms that make them appear irrational. The other approach, advocated by Silvano Arieti, is to take the words at face value but to attribute to the mad person a kind of deviant logic. I suggest, on the (...)
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  16. Birgit Linder (2011). Trauma and Truth: Representations of Madness in Chinese Literature. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):291-303.score: 8.0
    With only a few exceptions, the literary theme of madness has long been a domain of Western cultural studies. Much of Western writing represents madness as an inquiry into the deepest recesses of the mind, while the comparatively scarce Chinese tradition is generally defined by madness as a voice of social truth. This paper looks at five works of twentieth-century Chinese fiction that draw on socio-somatic aspects of madness to reflect upon social truths, suggesting that the inner voice of subjectivity (...)
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  17. Isabelle Travis (2011). 'Is Getting Well Ever An Art?': Psychopharmacology and Madness in Robert Lowell's Day by Day. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):315-324.score: 8.0
    On the publication of Robert Lowell’s Life Studies in 1959, some critics were shocked by the poet’s use of seemingly frank autobiographical material, in particular the portrayal of his hospitalizations for bipolar disorder. During the late fifties and throughout the sixties, a rich vein, influenced by Lowell , developed in American poetry. Also during this time, the nascent science of psychopharmacology competed with and complemented the more established somatic treatments, such as psychosurgery, shock treatments, and psychoanalytical therapies. The development of (...)
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  18. Geneviève Coudin (2013). The Breakdown of the Hegemonic Representation of Madness in Africa. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (1):23-44.score: 8.0
    Social science has recently examined the dramatic increase of witchcraft and magic in everyday contemporary African. A study, which took place in the 1970's, on the representation of madness in postcolonial Congo, contributes to the elucidation of such an outgrowth. In line with the first version of La Psychoanalyse, it aimed at identifying variations in the images, beliefs, and attitudes associated with groups whose social positioning differed in relation to modernity. Sixty old men were interviewed. The respondents provided a representation (...)
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  19. José María Ariso (2006). Desorientación, locura y huecos gramaticales: Wittgenstein escribe sobre lo inaudito. Disorientation, madness and grammatical gaps: Wittgenstein writes about the unheard-of. Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 39 (2):77-91.score: 8.0
    In this paper I show that madness, in the context of Wittgenstein’s later work, should not be mistaken for the grammatical gap which is opened when a reaction takes place, which has no place in the language-game played in that very moment. Besides, and bearing in mind that we often do not place worth on something until we miss it, it is emphasized that it is in the madman, taken as a grammatically isolated individual, with whom, we are best able (...)
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  20. Vera Fischer, Sy David Friedman & Yurii Khomskii (2013). Co-Analytic Mad Families and Definable Wellorders. Archive for Mathematical Logic 52 (7-8):809-822.score: 8.0
    We show that the existence of a ${\Pi^1_1}$ -definable mad family is consistent with the existence of a ${\Delta^{1}_{3}}$ -definable well-order of the reals and ${\mathfrak{b}=\mathfrak{c}=\aleph_3}$.
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  21. Michael Hrušák & Salvador García Ferreira (2003). Ordering MAD Families a la Katětov. Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (4):1337-1353.score: 8.0
    An ordering (≤K) on maximal almost disjoint (MAD) families closely related to destructibility of MAD families by forcing is introduced and studied. It is shown that the order has antichains of size.
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  22. Miloš S. Kurilić (2005). Mad Families, Forcing and the Suslin Hypothesis. Archive for Mathematical Logic 44 (4):499-512.score: 8.0
    Let κ be a regular cardinal and P a partial ordering preserving the regularity of κ. If P is (κ-Baire and) of density κ, then there is a mad family on κ killed in all generic extensions (if and) only if below each p∈P there exists a κ-sized antichain. In this case a mad family on κ is killed (if and) only if there exists an injection from κ onto a dense subset of Ult(P) mapping the elements of onto nowhere (...)
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  23. Nicholas Mowad (2013). Awakening to Madness and Habituation to Death in Hegel's Anthropology. In David Stern (ed.), Essays on Hegel's Philosophy of Subjective Spirit. State University of New York Press.score: 8.0
    Hegel argues that madness should not be understood as it had been traditionally, viz. ‘sleeping while awake,’ the intrusion of sleep or unconsciousness on waking, conscious life, but that rather madness must be understood as an inescapable possibility of waking life, and a constitutive part of consciousness itself.
     
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  24. Jennifer Mundale (2004). That Way Madness Lies: At the Intersection of Philosophy and Clinical Psychology. Metaphilosophy 35 (5):661-674.score: 7.0
  25. K. William M. Fulford (1995). Mind and Madness: New Directions in the Philosophy of Psychiatry. In A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.), Philosophy, Psychology, and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. 5-24.score: 7.0
    The links between Descartes logito and the schizophrenic symptom of "inserted thoughts" are used to illustrate the potential for two- way exchange between philosophy and psychiatry. Patients suffering thought insertion have thoughts in their heads, which "they" are thinking, but which they experience as the thoughts "of someone else": "I think therefore someone else is". Philosophical work on personal identity helps to clarify the remarkable phenomenological features of thought insertion: conversely, thought insertion challenges philosophical theories of personal identity. More generally, (...)
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  26. W. E. Cooper (1980). Materialism and Madness. Philosophical Papers 9 (May):36-40.score: 7.0
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  27. Raluca Ciurcanu (2010). Michel Foucault, Istoria Nebuniei in Epoca Clasica/ The History of Madness in Classical Age. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 1 (3):244-247.score: 7.0
    Michel Foucault, Istoria nebuniei in epoca clasica Ed. Humanitas, Bucuresti, 1996.
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  28. Tristan Bice (2011). MAD Families of Projections on L 2 and Real-Valued Functions on Ω. Archive for Mathematical Logic 50 (7-8):791-801.score: 7.0
    Two sets are said to be almost disjoint if their intersection is finite. Almost disjoint subsets of [ω] ω and ω ω have been studied for quite some time. In particular, the cardinal invariants ${\mathfrak{a}}$ and ${\mathfrak{a}_e}$ , defined to be the minimum cardinality of a maximal infinite almost disjoint family of [ω] ω and ω ω respectively, are known to be consistently less than ${\mathfrak{c}}$ . Here we examine analogs for functions in ${\mathbb{R}^\omega}$ and projections on l 2, showing (...)
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  29. Peter Alward (2004). Mad, Martian, but Not Mad Martian Pain. Sorites 15 (December):73-75.score: 6.0
    Functionalism cannot accommodate the possibility of mad pain—pain whose causes and effects diverge from those of the pain causal role. This is because what it is to be in pain according to functionalism is simply to be in a state that occupies the pain role. And the identity theory cannot accommodate the possibility of Martian pain—pain whose physical realization is foot-cavity inflation rather than C-fibre activation (or whatever physiological state occupies the pain-role in normal humans). After all, what it is (...)
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  30. David Carr (2010). Moral Madness. Philosophical Investigations 33 (2):103-125.score: 6.0
    One clear reason why human agents often act badly is because they are insufficiently attentive to moral considerations and concerns, or tempted to ignore these in pursuit of more immediate satisfactions. In so far as madness, insanity or mental instability may be regarded as undermining moral agency, it might also be supposed that such madness attaches more to the non-moral than the moral reasons or motives of agents. Still, the well-known quote from Chesterton at the start of this paper may (...)
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  31. Fred Ablondi (2007). Why It Matters That I'm Not Insane: The Role of the Madness Argument in Descartes's First Meditation. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):79-89.score: 6.0
    Descartes’s First Meditation employs a series of arguments designed to generate the worry that the senses might not provide sufficient evidence to justify one’staking as certain one’s beliefs about the way the world is. As the meditator considers what principle describes the conditions under which it is possible to attain certain knowledge, one after another doubt-generating device is ushered in, until at last he finds himself like someone caught in a whirlpool, able neither to stand firm nor to swim out. (...)
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  32. Eric Schwitzgebel (2012). Mad Belief? Neuroethics 5 (1):13-17.score: 6.0
    “Mad belief” (in analogy with Lewisian “mad pain”) would be a belief state with none of the causal role characteristic of belief—a state not caused or apt to have been caused by any of the sorts of events that usually cause belief and involving no disposition toward the usual behavioral or other manifestations of belief. On token-functionalist views of belief, mad belief in this sense is conceptually impossible. Cases of delusion—or at least some cases of delusion—might be cases of belief (...)
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  33. Daniel Werner (2011). Plato on Madness and Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):47-71.score: 6.0
    In the Phaedrus Socrates says that “the greatest goods” come from madness, and even seems to suggest that philosophy itself is a form of madness. But just how strongly should we understand these claims? I argue that Plato is not claiming that the philosopher is literally mad, in the sense of lacking rational self-control or being possessed by a god. Instead, Plato is appropriating the concept of “madness” and redefining it to refer to a unique state of philosophical cognition.
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  34. K. L. Evans & K. Steslow (2010). A Rest From Reason: Wittgenstein, Drury, and the Difference Between Madness and Religion. Philosophy 85 (2):245-258.score: 6.0
    Faced with troubling professional decisions in his long and successful career as a psychiatrist, M. O'C. Drury turned for direction to the philosophical work of his teacher and friend, Ludwig Wittgenstein. Of particular concern to Drury were the situations in which psychiatrists were expected to differentiate between instances of madness that were religious in form and instances of genuine religious experience that, for their oddity, landed believers in psychiatric consulting rooms. In this essay we consider the special orientation Wittgenstein's philosophy (...)
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  35. Richard P. Bentall (2003). Madness Explained. Allen Lane.score: 6.0
    In this ground breaking and controversial work Richard Bentall shatters the myths that surround madness. He shows there is no reassuring dividing line between mental health and mental illness.
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  36. P. H. Brazier (2014). 'God … or a Bad, or Mad, Man': C.S. Lewis's Argument for Christ – A Systematic Theological, Historical and Philosophical Analysis of Aut Deus Aut Malus Homo. Heythrop Journal 55 (1):1-30.score: 6.0
    The proposition that Jesus was ‘Bad, Mad or God’ is central to C.S. Lewis's popular apologetics. It is fêted by American Evangelicals, cautiously endorsed by Roman Catholics and Protestants, but often scorned by philosophers of religion. Most, mistakenly, regard Lewis's trilemma as unique. This paper examines the roots of this proposition in a two thousand year old theological and philosophical tradition (that is, aut Deus aut malus homo), grounded in the Johannine trilemma (‘unbalanced liar’, or ‘demonically possessed’, or ‘the God (...)
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  37. Markus Gabriel (2009). Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism. Continuum.score: 6.0
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
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  38. John Post (2003). Method, Madness, and Normativity. Philo: A Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):235-248.score: 6.0
    The method in question is conceptual analysis. The madness comes of its privileging received usage over theories that would revise our concepts so as to conform to the phenomena, not the other way around. The alternatives to capture-the-concept include revisionary theory-construction as practiced not only in the sciences but in some philosophies. I present a revisionary theory of an important kind of normativity -- the normativity involved in a biological adaptation's being for this or that -- which theory, (...)
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  39. Mitchell Aboulafia (2011). Through the Eyes of Mad Men: Simulation, Interaction, and Ethics. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2):133-147.score: 6.0
    Traditionally pragmatists have been favorably disposed to improving our understanding of agency and ethics through the use of empirical research. In the last two decades simulation theory has been championed in certain cognitive science circles as a way of explaining how we attribute mental states and predict human behavior. Drawing on research in psychology and neuroscience, Alvin I. Goldman and Robert M. Gordon have not only used simulation theory to discuss how we “mindread”, but have suggested that the theory has (...)
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  40. Sarah Chaney (2011). “A Hideous Torture on Himself”: Madness and Self-Mutilation in Victorian Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):279-289.score: 6.0
    This paper suggests that late nineteenth-century definitions of self-mutilation, a new category of psychiatric symptomatology, were heavily influenced by the use of self-injury as a rhetorical device in the novel, for the literary text held a high status in Victorian psychology. In exploring Dimmesdale’s “self-mutilation” in The Scarlet Letter in conjunction with psychiatric case histories, the paper indicates a number of common techniques and themes in literary and psychiatric texts. As well as illuminating key elements of nineteenth-century conceptions of the (...)
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  41. Matthew Frise (2013). The Mad, Bad, or God Argument Explained. Religious Studies 49 (4):581-589.score: 6.0
    According to Stephen Davis's Mad, Bad, or God (MBG) argument, Jesus must be divine since all other leading explanations of his alleged claim to be divine can be ruled out. I criticize Davis's argument and then sketch an ‘inference to best explanation’ MBG argument. I argue that proponents and critics of MBG arguments should focus on mine since it avoids common pitfalls at no cost and it best respects (for better or worse) a massive but too easily ignored body of (...)
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  42. Inmaculada Cobos Fernández (2001). A Journey to Madness: Jane Bowles's Narrative and Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (4):265-283.score: 6.0
    This work is a study of Jane Bowles's madness as revealed through several of her literary works and her life story. On a parallel plane, it is an epistemological exploration of the points of intersection between humanistic psychoanalysis and deconstructive literary criticism. Here we consider the schizoid traits in Two Serious Ladies (1943) and in “Camp Cataract” (1949), using the theories developed in this area by the psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927–1989).
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  43. David Scott (2009). Descartes, Madness and Method. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):153-171.score: 6.0
    This paper replies to Fred Ablondi’s discussion of Descartes’s treatment of madness in the Meditations. Against Ablondi’s interpretation that Descartes never seriously takes on board the skeptical hypothesis that he might be mad, because to do so would be for him to undermine the logical thought processes required to realize his agenda in the Meditations, I contend that Descartes does employ madness as a skeptical device, by assimilating its skeptical essentials into the dream argument. I maintain that while Descartes does (...)
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  44. Serife Tekin (2010). Mad Narratives: Exploring Self-Constitutions Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass. Dissertation, York Universityscore: 6.0
    In “Mad Narratives: Self-Constitutions Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass,” by using narrative approaches to the self, I explore how the diagnosis of mental disorder shapes personal identities and influences flourishing. My particular focus is the diagnosis grounded on the criteria provided by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). I develop two connected accounts pertaining to the self and mental disorder. I use the memoirs and personal stories written by the subjects with a DSM diagnosis as illustrations to bolster (...)
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  45. Michael Laing (2011). Sam Kean: The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World From the Periodic Table of the Elements. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):77-77.score: 6.0
    Sam Kean: The disappearing spoon: and other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements Content Type Journal Article Pages 77-77 DOI 10.1007/s10698-010-9101-x Authors Michael Laing, School of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4041 South Africa Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1.
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  46. Maureen Sie (2000). Mad, Bad, or Disagreeing? On Moral Competence and Responsibility. Philosophical Explorations 3 (3):262 – 281.score: 6.0
    Suppose that there is no real distinction between 'mad' and 'bad' because every truly bad-acting agent, proves to be a morally incompetent one. If this is the case: should we not change our ordinary interpersonal relationships in which we blame people for the things they do? After all, if people literally always act to 'the best of their abilities' nobody is ever to blame for the wrong they commit, whether these wrong actions are 'horrible monster'-like crimes or trivial ones, such (...)
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  47. Alison Ross (2000). Introduction to Monique David-Ménard on Kant and Madness. Hypatia 15 (4):77-81.score: 6.0
    : Ross examines the relation between thought and madness within the practical and theoretical wings of Kant's critical philosophy. She argues that the notion of critique is formulated as a guard against the tendency of thought to madness. She locates the significance of David-Ménard's essay on Kant's pre-critical works in the idea that Kant's own tendency to madness functions in these early works as a motivational principle for the mature, critical system.
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  48. Jenny Steinnes (2011). An Act of Methodology: A Document in Madness—Writing Ophelia. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):818-830.score: 6.0
    This paper is an attempt to stage some questions concerning methodology and education, inspired by Ophelia in Shakespeare's Hamlet and by Jacques Derrida's poetic philosophical oeuvres. What are at stake are the long traditions of preferences of sanity over madness, friend over enemy, male over female and of clean, unambiguous univocal language over the poetic. I will argue that educators will have an extra responsibility towards challenging the ancient tradition of phallogocentrism, both in our teaching and in our research.
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  49. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 6.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  50. Carl Olson (1999). Rationality and Madness: The Post-Modern Embrace of Dionysus and the Neo-Ved Nta Response of Radhakrishnan. Asian Philosophy 9 (1):39 – 50.score: 6.0
    Following the lead of Nietzsche, several post-modern philosophers challenge the Western notion of rationality and its representational model of thought and embrace the Dionysian element in Nietzsche's philosophy, which can take the form of embracing madness (Foucault), desire (Deleuze and Guattari), or carnival (Kristeva). This paper will place Radhakrishnan into the context of a hermeneutical dialogue with these figures from post-modern philosophy, and it will attempt to address the issue of the post-modem attack on rationality by these post-modern philosophers by (...)
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