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  1. Maeve Cooke (forthcoming). Truth in Narrative Fiction Kafka, Adorno and Beyond. Philosophy and Social Criticism:0191453714536433.
    Narrative fiction has the power to unsettle our deep-seated intuitions and expectations about what it means to live an ethically good life, and the kind of society that best facilitates this. Sometimes its disruptive power is disclosive, leading to an ethically significant shift in perception. I contend that the disruptive and disclosive powers of narrative fiction constitute a potential for ethical knowledge. I construe ethical knowledge as a learning process, oriented by a concern for truth, which involves the rational agency (...)
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  2. Maeve Cooke (2014). The Limits of Learning: Habermas' Social Theory and Religion. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Habermas' view that contemporary philosophy and social theory can learn from religious traditions calls for closer consideration. He is correct to hold that religious traditions constitute a reservoir of potentially important meanings that can be critically appropriated without emptying them of their motivating and inspirational power. However, contrary to what he implies, his theory allows for learning from religion only to a very limited degree. This is due to two core elements of his conceptual framework, both of which are key (...)
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  3. Maeve Cooke & Timo Jütten (2013). The Theory of Communicative Action After Three Decades. Constellations 20 (4):516-517.
    This is the introduction to a special section on Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action, published in Constellations 20:4 (2013), and edited by Maeve Cooke and me.
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  4. Maeve Cooke (2012). Dual Character of Concepts and the Discourse Theory of Law. In Matthias Klatt (ed.), Institutionalized Reason: The Jurisprudence of Robert Alexy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5. Maeve Cooke (2012). Habermas' Social Theory : The Critical Power of Communicative Rationality. In Ruth Sonderegger & Karin de Boer (eds.), Conceptions of Critique in Modern and Contemporary Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  6. Maeve Cooke (2012). Realism and Idealism: Was Habermas's Communicative Turn a Move in the Wrong Direction? Political Theory 40 (6):811 - 821.
  7. Maeve Cooke (2009). Beyond Dignity and Difference Revisiting the Politics of Recognition. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (1):76-95.
    Revisiting Taylor's 1992 account of the politics of recognition, I argue that he is right to discern a strand in contemporary politics that goes beyond the demand for recognition of dignity. Against Taylor I contend that this is best understood as a concern not for recognition of difference but for the value of something that is not universally shared, such as a particular ethical conception, cultural tradition or religious belief and practice. Using the examples of three social movements I show (...)
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  8. Maeve Cooke (2007). A Secular State for a Postsecular Society? Postmetaphysical Political Theory and the Place of Religion. Constellations 14 (2):224-238.
  9. Maeve Cooke (2006). Re-Presenting the Good Society. The Mit Press.
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  10. Maeve Cooke (2006). Resurrecting the Rationality of Ideology Critique: Reflections on Laclau on Ideology. Constellations 13 (1):4-20.
  11. Maeve Cooke (2006). Salvaging and Secularizing the Semantic Contents of Religion: The Limitations of Habermas's Postmetaphysical Proposal. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):187 - 207.
    The article considers Jürgen Habermas's views on the relationship between postmetaphysical philosophy and religion. It outlines Habermas's shift from his earlier, apparently dismissive attitude towards religion to his presently more receptive stance. This more receptive stance is evident in his recent emphasis on critical engagement with the semantic contents of religion and may be characterized by two interrelated theses: (a) the view that religious contributions should be included in political deliberations in the informally organized public spheres of contemporary democracies, though (...)
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  12. Maeve Cooke (2005). Avoiding Authoritarianism: On the Problem of Justification in Contemporary Critical Social Theory. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (3):379 – 404.
    Critical social theories look critically at the ways in which particular social arrangements hinder human flourishing, with a view to bringing about social change for the better. In this they are guided by the idea of a good society in which the identified social impediments to human flourishing would once and for all have been removed. The question of how these guiding ideas of the good life can be justified as valid across socio-cultural contexts and historical epochs is the most (...)
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  13. Maeve Cooke (2004). Redeeming Redemption: The Utopian Dimension of Critical Social Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (4):413-429.
    Critical social theory has an uneasy relationship with utopia. On the one hand, the idea of an alternative, better social order is necessary in order to make sense of its criticisms of a given social context. On the other hand, utopian thinking has to avoid ‘bad utopianism’, defined as lack of connection with the actual historical process, and ‘finalism’, defined as closure of the historical process. Contemporary approaches to critical social theory endeavour to avoid these dangers by way of a (...)
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  14. Maeve Cooke (2003). The Weaknesses of Strong Intersubjectivism Habermas's Conception of Justice. European Journal of Political Theory 2 (3):281-305.
    The article deals with Habermas's intersubjective approach to critical social theory, focusing on his intersubjective accounts of truth, justice and democratic legitimacy. Distinguishing between stronger and weaker versions of an intersubjective account, it draws attention to Habermas's recent move from a strong intersubjective, constructivist, interpretation of truth to a weaker, non-constructivist, one. It then looks at his refusal to make a similar move in the case of justice, arguing that it is not well-founded, even from the point of view of (...)
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  15. Lena Halldenius, Maeve Cooke, Lilian Alweiss, John Erik Fossum, Bruce Haddock & Julia Stapleton (2003). Contributors. European Journal of Political Theory 2 (3):259-260.
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  16. Maeve Cooke (2002). Argumentation and Transformation. Argumentation 16 (1):81-110.
    I consider argumentation from the point of view of context-transcendent cognitive transformation through reference to the critical social theory of Jürgen Habermas. My aim is threefold. First, to make the case for a concept of context-transcendent cognitive transformation. Second, to clarify the transformatory role of argumentation itself by showing that, while argumentation may contribute constructively to context-transcendent cognitive transformation, such transformation presupposes the existence of a reality conceptually independent of argumentation. Third, to cast light on the problem of how to (...)
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  17. Maeve Cooke (2002). Martin Beck Matustik, Jurgen Habermas. A Philosophical-Political Profile Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (5):338-340.
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  18. Maeve Cooke (2002). Speech Acts and Validity Claims. In David M. Rasmussen & James Swindal (eds.), Jürgen Habermas. Sage Publications. 4--136.
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  19. Maeve Cooke (2001). Meaning and Truth in Habermas's Pragmatics. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):1–23.
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  20. Maeve Cooke (2001). Socio-Cultural Learning as a 'Transcendental Fact': Habermas's Postmetaphysical Perspective. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (1):63 – 83.
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  21. Maeve Cooke (2000). Between 'Objectivism' and 'Contextualism': The Normative Foundations of Social Philosophy. Critical Horizons 1 (2):193-227.
    One of the principal challenges facing contemporary social philosophy is how to find foundations that are normatively robust yet congruent with its self-understanding. Social philosophy is a critical project within modernity, an interpretative horizon that stresses the influences of history and context on knowledge and experience. However, if it is to engage in intercultural dialogue and normatively robust social critique,social philosophy requires non-arbitrary,universal normative standards.The task of normative foundations can thus be formulated in terms of negotiating the tension between 'contextualism' (...)
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  22. Maeve Cooke (2000). Feminism and Justice. In Joseph Dunne, Attracta Ingram, Frank Litton & Fergal O'Connor (eds.), Questioning Ireland: Debates in Political Philosophy and Public Policy. Institute of Public Administration. 124.
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  23. Maeve Cooke (1999). A Space of One's Own: Autonomy, Privacy, Liberty. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (1):22-53.
    The value of a negatively defined private space is defended as important for the development of personal autonomy. It is argued that negative liberty is problematic when split off from its connection with this ideal. An ethical interpretation of personal autonomy is proposed according to which a private space is one of autonomy's preconditions. This leads to a conceptualization of privacy that is fruitful in two respects: it permits an account of privacy laws that avoids certain pitfalls, and it serves (...)
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  24. Maeve Cooke (1999). Habermas, Feminism and the Question of Autonomy. In Peter Dews (ed.), Habermas: A Critical Reader. Blackwell. 178--210.
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  25. Maeve Cooke (1999). Questioning Autonomy: The Feminist Challenge and the Challenge for Feminism. In Richard Kearney & Mark Dooley (eds.), Questioning Ethics: Contemporary Debates in Philosophy. Routledge. 258--282.
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  26. Maeve Cooke (1997). Authenticity and Autonomy: Taylor, Habermas, and the Politics of Recognition. Political Theory 25 (2):258-288.
  27. Maeve Cooke (1997). Are Ethical Conflicts Irreconcilable? Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (2):1-19.
    The discussion starts with the fact of ethical disagreement in contemporary liberal democracies. In responding to the question of whether such conflicts are reconcilable, it proposes a normative model of deliberative democracy that seeks to avoid the privatization of ethical concerns. It is argued that many contemporary models of democracy privatize ethical matters either because of a view that ethical conflicts are fundamentally irreconcilable or because of a mis trust of the ideal of rational consensus in the fields of law (...)
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  28. Maeve Cooke (1997). Language and Reason: A Study of Habermas's Pragmatics. The Mit Press.
    Language and Reason opens up new territory for social theorists by providing thefirst general introduction to Habermas's program of formal pragmatics: his reconstruction of theuniversal principles of possible understanding that, he argues, ...
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  29. Maeve Cooke (1995). Selfhood and Solidarity. Constellations 1 (3):337-57.
     
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  30. Pascal O'Gorman, Eoin G. Cassidy, Maire O'Neill, James McCormick, Maeve Cooke, Patrick Gorevan & Attracta Ingram (1994). Books Briefly Noted. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (2):381 – 387.
    Essays on Philosophy and Economic Methodology By Daniel M. Hausman Cambridge University Press, 1992. Pp. 259. ISBN 0?521?41740?6. £35.00. Le Fondement de la morale: Essai d'éthiquephilosophique By André Léonard Cerf, 1991. Pp. 381. ISBN not available. FF240. The Philosophy of Time Edited By Robin Le Poidevin and Murray MacBeath Oxford University Press, 1993. Pp. 230. ISBN 0?19?823998?X. £27.50. The Ethics and Politics of Human Experimentation By Paul M. McNeill Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. 315. ISBN 0?521?41627?2. £35.00. Modern Conditions, Postmodern (...)
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  31. Maeve Cooke (1993). Habermas and Consensus. European Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):247-267.
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  32. Maeve Cooke (1992). The Communicative Ethics Controversy. Philosophical Studies 33:335-337.
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