9 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Mahesh Ananth (Indiana University South Bend)
  1.  98
    Mahesh Ananth (2014). A Cognitive Interpretation of Aristotle’s Concepts of Catharsis and Tragic Pleasure. International Journal of Art and Art History 2 (2).
    Jonathan Lear argues that the established purgation, purification, and cognitive stimulation interpretations of Aristotle’s concepts of catharsis and tragic pleasure are off the mark. In response, Lear defends an anti-cognitivist account, arguing that it is the pleasure associated with imaginatively “living life to the full” and yet hazarding nothing of importance that captures Aristotle’s understanding of catharsis and tragic pleasure. This analysis reveals that Aristotle’s account of imagination in conjunction with his understanding of both specific intellectual virtues and rational emotions (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mahesh Ananth (2010). The Scientific Study of Consciousness: Searle’s Radical Request. Psyche 16 (2):59-89.
    John Searle offers what he thinks to be a reasonable scientific approach to the understanding of consciousness. I argue that Searle is demanding nothing less than a Kuhnian-type revolution with respect to how scientists should study consciousness given his rejection of the subject-object distinction and affirmation of mental causation. As part of my analysis, I reveal that Searle embraces a version of emergentism that is in tension, not only with his own account, but also with some of the theoretical tenets (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Mahesh Ananth (2005). Psychological Altruism Vs. Biological Altruism: Narrowing the Gap with the Baldwin Effect. Acta Biotheoretica 53 (3):217-239.
    This paper defends the position that the supposed gap between biological altruism and psychological altruism is not nearly as wide as some scholars (e.g., Elliott Sober) insist. Crucial to this defense is the use of James Mark Baldwin's concepts of “organic selection”and “social heredity” to assist in revealing that the gap between biological and psychological altruism is more of a small lacuna. Specifically, this paper argues that ontogenetic behavioral adjustments, which are crucial to individual survival and reproduction, are also crucial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  57
    Mahesh Ananth & Mike Scheessele (2012). Exempting All Minimal-Risk Research From IRB Review: Pruning or Poisoning the Regulatory Tree? IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (2):9-14.
    In a recent commentary, Kim and colleagues argued that minimal-risk research should be deregulated so that such studies do not require review by an institutional review board. They claim that regulation of minimal-risk studies provides no adequate counterbalancing good and instead leads to a costly human subjects oversight system. We argue that the counterbalancing good of regulating minimal-risk studies is that oversight exists to ensure that respect for persons and justice requirements are satisfied when they otherwise might not be.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  48
    Mahesh Ananth (2016). Gregory E. Kaebnick and Thomas H. Murray, Eds., Synthetic Biology and Morality: Artificial Life and the Bounds of Nature. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):241-248.
    One way of acknowledging the putative progress of science is to trace its successes with respect to description, manipulation, and genuine innovation. In this regard, the history of genetics can be viewed as an exemplary case study. Indeed, the ground breaking work of Watson and Crick, the remarkable results associated with both describing and manipulating regulatory genes (e.g., early and recent work on Drosophila), and the cutting edge efforts related to nuclear transfer (i.e., cloning) are stunning progress-worthy accomplishments. Yet, there (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  62
    Mahesh Ananth (2009). Social Brain Matters. Teaching Philosophy 32 (3):305-312.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  21
    Mahesh Ananth (2008). In Defense of an Evolutionary Concept of Health. Ashgate.
    In responding to this debate, Ananth both surveys the existing literature, with special focus on the work of Christopher Boorse, and argues that a naturalistic ...
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8.  15
    Mahesh Ananth & Timothy Cleveland (2001). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 28 (1-4):539-555.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Mahesh Ananth (2003). Boorse and His Critics: Toward a Naturalistic Concept of Health. Dissertation, Bowling Green State University
    The contemporary debate on the concept of health is a tug-of-war between naturalists and normativists. Although health can be valued or disvalued, naturalists argue that the concept of health is value-free. In contrast, normativists argue that the concept of health is value-laden. This dissertation examines this controversy focusing on the naturalistic concept of health defended by Christopher Boorse. Boorse claims that health and disease are value-free concepts in the sense that diseased and healthy states can be gleaned from the facts (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography