Search results for 'Malcolm Horne' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Malcolm Horne (2010). Johnny Wilkinson's Addiction. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):31-34.
    A brief poll of my scientific colleagues confirmed that, to a person, they regard addiction as a disease, whereas most non-science acquaintances consider it to be a failure of willpower. Reconciliation of these polarized views seems difficult and rather than finding a middle path, such as suggested by Foddy and Savulescu. I am an entrenched supporter of the view that addiction can be a disease. I first should declare my position as a card-carrying biologist, holding the view that behavior emanates (...)
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  2.  3
    Malcolm Horne (2011). Are People in a Persistent Vegetative State Conscious? Monash Bioethics Review 28 (2):12-1.
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  3.  62
    Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. Moore, Norman Malcolm & Gabriel Citron (2015). A Discussion Between Wittgenstein and Moore on Certainty : From the Notes of Norman Malcolm. Mind 124 (493):73-84.
    In April 1939, G. E. Moore read a paper to the Cambridge University Moral Science Club entitled ‘Certainty’. In it, amongst other things, Moore made the claims that: the phrase ‘it is certain’ could be used with sense-experience-statements, such as ‘I have a pain’, to make statements such as ‘It is certain that I have a pain’; and that sense-experience-statements can be said to be certain in the same sense as some material-thing-statements can be — namely in the sense that (...)
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  4.  3
    James R. Horne (1991). Saintliness And Moral Perfection: JAMES R. HORNE. Religious Studies 27 (4):463-471.
    In the course of supporting his larger thesis about mysticism, Steven Katz argues that, ‘Every religious community and every mystical movement within each community has a “model” or “models” of the ideal practitioner of the religious life.' Among thirteen functions of such models he mentions three that partially overlap. He says that these model lives set standards of perfection to measure believers' actions, they are perfect examples of what it is to be a human being, and they are moral paradigms. (...)
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  5. James R. Horne (1977). Do Mystics Perceive Themselves?: JAMES R. HORNE. Religious Studies 13 (3):327-333.
    Mystics have always claimed that a very significant kind of self-perception is possible, at the end of certain spiritual disciplines. The self that is then supposed to be known is a unity, identical from one experience to the next, and not to be identified with any particular experiences, such as impressions or ideas, which the self has. In short, mystical testimony supports something like a theory of the essential self as simple and unchanging.
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  6. James R. Horne (1975). Which Mystic has the Revelation?: JAMES R. HORNE. Religious Studies 11 (3):283-291.
    Since the late nineteenth century, studies of mysticism have presented us with two contrasting conclusions. The first is that mystics all over the world report basically the same experience, and the second is that there are great differences among the reports, and possibly among the experiences. On the positive side there are such works as Huxley's The Perennial Philosophy , with its claim that all mystics say that all beings are manifestations of a Divine Ground, that men learn of this (...)
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  7. N. Malcolm & G. H. von Wright (1986). Ludwig Wittgenstein. A Memoir, Second Edition with Wittgenstein's Letters to Malcolm. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 48 (2):336-337.
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  8. Norman Malcolm (1965). Professor Malcolm on "Scientific Materialism and the Identity Theory" Rejoinder to Mr. Sosa. Dialogue 3 (4):424.
     
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  9.  56
    Norman Malcolm (1957). Dreaming and Scepticism: A Rejoinder. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 35 (December):207-211.
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  10.  30
    Norman Malcolm (2001). Ludwig Wittgenstein: A Memoir. Clarendon Press.
    Wittgenstein was one of the most powerful influences on contemporary philosophy, yet he shunned publicity and was essentially a private man. This remarkable, vivid, personal memoir is written by one of his friends, the eminent philosopher Norman Malcolm. Reissued in paperback, this edition includes the complete text of fifty-seven letters which Wittgenstein wrote to Malcolm over a period of eleven years. Also included is a concise biographical sketch by another of Wittgenstein's philosopher friends, Georg Henrik von Wright. 'A (...)
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  11.  15
    Norman Malcolm (1994). Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View? Cornell University Press.
    The book concludes with a critical discussion of Malcolm's essay by Peter Winch.
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  12.  53
    Norman Malcolm (1995). Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays, 1978-1989. Cornell University Press.
    At a time when interest in the Wittgensteinian tradition has quickened, this volume brings together fourteen essays by Norman Malcolm, a prominent philosopher ...
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  13.  13
    Noel Malcolm (2002). Aspects of Hobbes. Oxford University Press.
    These essays are the fruit of many years' research by one of the world's leading Hobbes scholars. Noel Malcolm offers not only succinct introductions to Hobbes 's life and thought, but also path-breaking studies of many different aspects of his political philosophy, his scientific and religious theories, his relations with his contemporaries, the sources of his ideas, the printing history of his works, and his influence on European thought.
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  14.  3
    John S. Bell, J. Clauser, M. Horne & A. Shimony (1985). An Exchange on Local Beables. Dialectica 39 (2):85-96.
    Summarya) Bell tries to formulate more explicitly a notion of “local causality”: correlations between physical events in different space‐time regions should be explicable in terms of physical events in the overlap of the backward light cones. It is shown that ordinary relativistic quantum field theory is not locally causal in this sense, and cannot be embedded in a locally causal theory.b) Clauser, Home and Shimony criticize several steps in Bell's argument that any theory of local “beables” is incompatible with quantum (...)
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  15. Noel Malcolm (2004). Aspects of Hobbes. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Noel Malcolm, one of the world's leading experts on Thomas Hobbes, presents a set of extended essays on a wide variety of aspects of the life and work of this giant of early modern thought. Malcolm offers a succinct introduction to Hobbes's life and thought, as a foundation for his discussion of such topics as his political philosophy, his theory of international relations, the development of his mechanistic world-view, and his subversive Biblical criticism. Several of the essays pay (...)
     
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  16. Norman Malcolm & Peter Winch (2002). Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View? Routledge.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein once said: 'I am not a religious man, but I cannot help seeing every problem from a religious point of view.' This study, the last work of the distinguished philosopher Norman Malcolm, is a discussion of what Wittgenstein may have meant by this and its significance for philosophy. The book concludes with a critical discussion of Malcolm's essay by Peter Winch.
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  17.  9
    John Malcolm (1985). On What is Not in Any Way in the Sophist. Classical Quarterly 35 (02):520-.
    To ensnare the sophist of the Sophist in a definition disclosing him as a purveyor of images and falsehoods Plato must block the sophistical defence that image and falsehood are self-contradictory in concept, for they both embody the proposition proscribed by Parmenides — ‘What is not, is’. It has been assumed that Plato regards this defence as depending on a reading of ‘what is not’ in its very strongest sense, where it is equivalent to ‘what is not in any way’ (...)
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  18.  9
    John Malcolm (1991). Plato on the Self-Predication of Forms: Early and Middle Dialogues. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Malcolm presents a new and radical interpretation of Plato's earlier dialogues. He argues that the few cases of self-predication contained therein are acceptable simply as statements concerning universals, and that therefore Plato is not vulnerable in these cases to the Third Man Argument. In considering the middle dialogues, Malcolm takes a conservative stance, rejecting influential current doctrines which portray the Forms as being not self-predicative. He shows that the middle dialogues do indeed take Forms to (...)
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  19.  23
    Noel Malcolm (2007). Reason of State, Propaganda, and the Thirty Years' War: An Unknown Translation by Thomas Hobbes. Clarendon Press.
    Acclaimed writer and historian Noel Malcolm presents his sensational discovery of a new work by Thomas Hobbes : a propaganda pamphlet on behalf of the Habsburg side in the Thirty Years' War, translated by Hobbes from a Latin original. Malcolm's book explores a fascinating episode in seventeenth-century history, illuminating both the practice of early modern propaganda and the theory of "reason of state".
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  20. Noel Malcolm (2010). Reason of State, Propaganda, and the Thirty Years' War: An Unknown Translation by Thomas Hobbes. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Acclaimed writer and historian Noel Malcolm presents his sensational discovery of a new work by Thomas Hobbes : a propaganda pamphlet on behalf of the Habsburg side in the Thirty Years' War, translated by Hobbes from a Latin original. Malcolm's book explores a fascinating episode in seventeenth-century history, revealing the involvement of a great modern thinker in secret and dangerous machinations of international politics.
     
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  21. Noel Malcolm (ed.) (2012). Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan. OUP Oxford.
    Noel Malcolm presents his long-awaited critical edition of one of the most important philosophical works ever written. Hobbes's Leviathan (1651) is a classic of political theory and of English prose, studied at every university in the world. The English and Latin versions of the text are fully annotated, with a book-length introduction.
     
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  22. Noel Malcolm (ed.) (2014). Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan: Editorial Introduction. OUP Oxford.
    Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan is one of the most important philosophical texts in the English language, and one of the most influential works of political philosophy ever written. This Introduction accompanies Noel Malcolm's long-awaited critical edition, and gives a path-breaking account of the work's context, sources, and textual history.
     
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  23. Noel Malcolm (ed.) (2014). Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan: The English and Latin Texts. OUP Oxford.
    This is the first critical edition of Hobbes's Leviathan based on a full study of the manuscript and printing history, and the first to place the English text alongside Hobbes's later Latin version of it. Both texts are fully annotated with explanatory notes. Noel Malcolm's definitive edition sets the study of Hobbes's masterwork on a new basis.
     
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  24.  11
    Norman Malcolm (1977). Memory and Mind. Cornell University Press.
  25.  45
    David M. Armstrong & Norman Malcolm (1984). Consciousness and Causality: A Debate on the Nature of Mind. Blackwell.
  26.  43
    Norman Malcolm (1986). Nothing is Hidden: Wittgenstein's Criticism of His Early Thought. Blackwell.
  27. Norman Malcolm (1960). Anselm's Ontological Arguments. Philosophical Review 69 (1):41-62.
  28. Norman Malcolm (1958). Knowledge of Other Minds. Journal of Philosophy 55 (September):35-52.
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  29. Norman Malcolm (1968). The Conceivability of Mechanism. Philosophical Review 77 (January):45-72.
  30. Norman Malcolm (1954). Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. Philosophical Review 63 (4):530-59.
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  31. Norman Malcolm (1973). Thoughtless Brutes. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 46 (September):5-20.
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  32.  1
    D. J. Wilkinson, G. Kahane, M. Horne & J. Savulescu (2009). Functional Neuroimaging and Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment From Vegetative Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):508-511.
    Recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging of patients in a vegetative state have raised the possibility that such patients retain some degree of consciousness. In this paper, the ethical implications of such findings are outlined, in particular in relation to decisions about withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. It is sometimes assumed that if there is evidence of consciousness, treatment should not be withdrawn. But, paradoxically, the discovery of consciousness in very severely brain-damaged patients may provide more reason to let them die. (...)
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  33. Norman Malcolm (1963). Knowledge and Certainty. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
  34. Norman Malcolm (1989). Wittgenstein on Language and Rules. Philosophy 64 (January):5-28.
    An attempt is made to answer the question why wittgenstein might have found the analogy between speaking and playing games philosophically exciting. It is argued that on the face of it the two are strikingly disanalogous, But that on reflecting further one can find various features of games (9 are distinguished in all) which are also features of some speech episodes, And the awareness of which could be philosophically significant.
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  35. Norman Malcolm (1956). Dreaming and Skepticism. Philosophical Review 65 (January):14-37.
  36. Norman Malcolm (1958). Ludwig Wittgenstein. New York, Oxford University Press.
  37. Norman Malcolm (1964). Moore and Ordinary Language. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Ordinary Language: Essays in Philosophical Method. Dover Publications
     
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  38. Norman Malcolm (1967). Wittgenstein's Philosophische Bermerkungen. Philosophical Review 76 (2):220-229.
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  39. Norman Malcolm (1951). Philosophy for Philosophers. Philosophical Review 60 (3):329-340.
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  40. H. H. Horne (1916). Royce's Idealism as a Philosophy of Education. Philosophical Review 25 (3):473-478.
  41. Norman Malcolm (1977). Thought and Knowledge: Essays. Cornell University Press.
    Descartes' proof that his essence is thinking.--Thoughtless brutes.--Descartes' proof that he is essentially a non-material thing.--Behaviorism as a philosophy of psychology.--The privacy of experience.--Wittgenstein on the nature of mind.--The myth of cognitive processes and structures.--Moore and Wittgenstein on the sense of "I know."--The groundlessness of belief.
     
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  42. Norman Malcolm (1949). Defending Common Sense. Philosophical Review 58 (3):201-220.
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  43. Norman Malcolm (1952). Knowledge and Belief. Mind 61 (242):178-189.
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  44. Norman Malcolm (1988). Subjectivity. Philosophy 63 (April):147-60.
    In his book The View from Nowhere , Thomas Nagel says that ‘the subjectivity of consciousness is an irreducible feature of reality’ . He speaks of ‘the essential subjectivity of the mental’ , and of ‘the mind's irreducibly subjective character’ . ‘Mental concepts’, he says, refer to ‘subjective points of view and their modifications’ : The subjective features of conscious mental processes—as opposed to their physical causes and effects—cannot be captured by the purified form of thought suitable for dealing with (...)
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  45.  35
    Norman Malcolm (1982). Wittgenstein: The Relation of Language to Instinctive Behaviour. Philosophical Investigations 5 (1):3-22.
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  46.  96
    Norman Malcolm (1964). Scientific Materialism and the Identity Theory. Dialogue 3 (2):115-25.
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  47.  76
    Norman Malcolm (1988). Wittgenstein's Scepticism' in on Certainty. Inquiry 31 (3):277 – 293.
    This paper compares Wittgenstein's conception of ?objective certainty? with Descartes's ?metaphysical certainty?. According to both conceptions if you are certain of something in these senses, then it is inconceivable that you are mistaken. But a striking difference is that for Descartes, if you are metaphysically certain of something it follows both that the something is so and that you know it is so; whereas on Wittgenstein's conception neither thing follows. I try to show that there is a form of ?scepticism? (...)
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  48.  69
    Norman Malcolm (1965). Descartes's Proof That His Essence is Thinking. Philosophical Review 74 (3):315-338.
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  49.  54
    Norman Malcolm (1953). Direct Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (October):301-316.
  50.  71
    N. Malcolm (1942). Certainty and Empirical Statements. Mind 51 (201):18-46.
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