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  1. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (2006). Interleaving Brain Systems for Episodic and Recognition Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):455-463.
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  2. Malcolm W. Brown (2002). A Feast of Memories. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):488.
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  3. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampal–Anterior Thalamic Axis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):425-444.
    By utilizing new information from both clinical and experimental (lesion, electrophysiological, and gene-activation) studies with animals, the anatomy underlying anterograde amnesia has been reformulated. The distinction between temporal lobe and diencephalic amnesia is of limited value in that a common feature of anterograde amnesia is damage to part of an comprising the hippocampus, the fornix, the mamillary bodies, and the anterior thalamic nuclei. This view, which can be traced back to Delay and Brion (1969), differs from other recent models in (...)
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  4. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Thanks for the Memories: Extending the Hippocampal-Diencephalic Mnemonic System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):471-479.
    The goal of our target article was to review a number of emerging facts about the effects of limbic damage on memory in humans and animals, and about divisions within recognition memory in humans. We then argued that this information can be synthesized to produce a new view of the substrates of episodic memory. The key pathway in this system is from the hippocampus to the anterior thalamic nuclei. There seems to be a general agreement that the importance of this (...)
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