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  1. David Buttelmann, Malinda Carpenter & Michael Tomasello (2009). Eighteen-Month-Old Infants Show False Belief Understanding in an Active Helping Paradigm. Cognition 112 (2):337-342.
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  2. Malinda Carpenter (2009). Just How Joint Is Joint Action in Infancy? Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):380-392.
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  3. Ulf Liszkowski, Malinda Carpenter & Michael Tomasello (2008). Twelve-Month-Olds Communicate Helpfully and Appropriately for Knowledgeable and Ignorant Partners. Cognition 108 (3):732-739.
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  4. Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll (2005). In Search of the Uniquely Human. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):721-727.
    As Bruner so eloquently points out, and Gauvain echoes, human beings are unique in their “locality.” Individual groups of humans develop their own unique ways of symbolizing and doing things – and these can be very different from the ways of other groups, even those living quite nearby. Our attempt in the target article was to propose a theory of the social-cognitive and social-motivational bases of humans' ability and propensity to live in this local, that is, this cultural, way – (...)
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  5. Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll (2005). Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural cognition and (...)
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