Search results for 'Manifest and Scientific Images' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. Kyle Stanford (2012). The Eyes Don’T Have It: Fracturing the Scientific and Manifest Images. Humana.Mente 21:19-44.score: 666.0
    Wilfrid Sellars famously argued that we find ourselves simultaneously presented with the scientific and manifest images and that the primary aim of philosophy is to reconcile the competing conceptions of ourselves and our place in the world they offer. I first argue that Sellars’ own attempts at such a reconciliation must be judged a failure. I then go on to point out that Sellars has invited us to join him in idealizing and constructing the manifest and (...)
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  2. Keith Lehrer (2012). The Unity of the Manifest and Scientific Image by Self-Representation. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 492.0
    Sellars (1963) distinguished in Empiricism and Philosophy of Mind between ordinary discourse, which expressed his “manifest image”, and scientific discourse, which articulated his “scientific image” of man-in-the-world in a way that is both central and problematic to the rest of his philosophy. Our contention is that the problematic feature of the distinction results from Sellars theory of inner episodes as theoretical entities. On the other hand, as Sellars attempted to account for our noninferential knowledge of such states, (...)
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  3. Bas C. van Fraassen, The Manifest Image and the Scientific Image.score: 348.0
    6.     The Images as philosophical miscreants 6.1      What is this thing called the Manifest Image? 6.2      And what of that thing called the Scientific Image? 6.3      The dialectic that engenders the dichotomy 7.     The very idea of images..
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  4. Jay L. Garfield (2012). Sellarsian Synopsis: Integrating the Images. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 306.0
    Most discussion of Sellars’ deployment of the distinct images of “man-in-the-world” in "Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man" focus entirely on the manifest and the scientific images. But the original image is important as well. In this essay I explore the importance of the original image to the Sellarsian project of naturalizing epistemology, connecting Sellars’ insights regarding this image to recent work in cognitive development.
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  5. Steven F. Savitt (2012). Of Time and the Two Images. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 302.0
    In this paper I argue that the clash of the Sellars’ two images is particularly acute in the case of time. In Time and the World Order Sellars seems embarked on a quest to locate manifest time in Minkowski spacetime. I suggest that he should have argued for the replacement of manifest time with the local, path-dependent time of the “scientific image”, just as he suggests that manifest objects must be replaced by their scientific (...)
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  6. David Hodgson (2012). Identifying and Reconciling Two Images of “Man”. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 302.0
    Fifty years ago the philosopher Wilfred Sellars identified two images of “man”, which he called respectively the “manifest image” and the “scientific image”; and he considered whether and how these two images could be reconciled. In this paper, I will very briefly look at the distinction drawn by Sellars and at his suggestions for reconciliation of these images. I will suggest that a broad distinction as suggested by Sellars can indeed usefully be drawn, but that (...)
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  7. Willem deVries (2012). Ontology and the Completeness of Sellars’s Two Images. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21:1-18.score: 238.0
    Sellars claims completeness for both the “manifest” and the “scientific images” in a way that tempts one to assume that they are independent of each other, while, in fact, they must share at least one common element: the language of individual and community intentions. I argue that this significantly muddies the waters concerning his claim of ontological primacy for the scientific image, though not in favor of the ontological primacy of the manifest image. The lesson (...)
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  8. Ilkka Niiniluoto & Critical Scientific Realism (2001). Van Brakel: Philosophy of Chemistry. Between the Manifest and the Scientific Image (Louvain Philosophical Studies 15), Leuven 2000 (Leuven University Press), XXII+ 246 Index (Bfr. 700,–). Cao, Tian Yu (Ed.): Conceptual Foundation of Quantum Field Theory. Cambridge (Univer-Sity Press) 1999, XIX+ 399 Index (£ 60.–). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 32:199-200.score: 232.0
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  9. Klaus Ruthenberg & Rom Harré (2012). Philosophy of Chemistry as Intercultural Philosophy: Jaap van Brakel. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 14 (3):193-203.score: 227.0
    After a brief biography of Jaap van Brakel we set out his appropriation and use of the distinction between the manifest image and the scientific image of the world. In a certain sense van Brakel gives priority to the manifest image as the ultimate source of meaning in chemical discourses. He does not take sides in the debate about nominal and real essences, twin earths and so, but presents a compromise. As an active practitioner of the chemical (...)
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  10. Joachim Schummer (2002). Jaap Van Brakel, Philosophy of Chemistry. Between the Manifest and the Scientific Image. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (1):168-174.score: 225.0
  11. Robin Findlay Hendry (2005). Book Review: Jaap Van Brakel: Philosophy of Chemistry: Between the Manifest and the Scientific Image Leuven University Press, Leuven, 2000, XIV + 246 Pp., ISBN 90-5867-063-. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (2):187-197.score: 225.0
  12. Rom Harré (2001). Book Review: Van Brakel, Jaap: "Philosophy of Chemistry. Between the Manifest and the Scientific Image" (Leuven 2000). [REVIEW] Hyle 7 (2):178 - 180.score: 225.0
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  13. Fernando Birman (2010). Pragmatic Concerns and Images of the World. Philosophia 38 (4):715-731.score: 193.0
    I defend a pragmatist reinterpretation of Sellars’s famous manifest-scientific distinction. I claim that in order to do justice to this important distinction we must first recognize, despite what philosophers—including, arguably, Sellars—often make of it, that the distinction does not draw an epistemological or metaphysical boundary between different kinds of objects and events, but a pragmatic boundary between different ways in which we interact with objects and events. Put differently, I argue that the manifest-scientific distinction, in my (...)
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  14. Christoph Lüthy & Alexis Smets (2009). Words, Lines, Diagrams, Images: Towards a History of Scientific Imagery. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):398-439.score: 168.0
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  15. Stephen M. Downes (2012). How Much Work Do Scientific Images Do? Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):115-130.score: 168.0
    In this paper, I defend the view that there are many scientific images that have a serious epistemic role in science but this role is not adequately accounted for by the going view of representation and its attendant theoretical commitments. The relevant view of representation is Laura Perini’s account of representation for scientific images. I draw on Adina Roskies’ work on scientific images as well as work on models in science to support my conclusion.
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  16. Douglas Cromey (2010). Avoiding Twisted Pixels: Ethical Guidelines for the Appropriate Use and Manipulation of Scientific Digital Images. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):639-667.score: 148.0
    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) (...)
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  17. Evandro Agazzi (2010). The Scientific Images and the Global Knowledge of the Human Being. In Malcolm A. Jeeves (ed.), Rethinking Human Nature: A Multidisciplinary Approach. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Company.score: 140.0
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  18. Iain Cameron (1979). Scientific Images and Their Social Uses: An Introduction to the Concept of Scientism. Butterworth.score: 140.0
     
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  19. M. Lynch (forthcoming). The Production of Scientific Images. Vision and Re-Vision, Philiosophy and Sociology of Science. Communication and Cognition.score: 140.0
     
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  20. Andrew Chrucky, The Manifest Image ≠ the Commonsense Conceptual Framework (in the Philosophy of Wilfrid Sellars).score: 128.7
    Most readers of Sellars' philosophy learn about a Manifest-Scientific Image distinction, and because apparently nothing significant hinges on what at first sight seems just a neologistic labeling of a familiar distinction, it is henceforth wrongly associated with a pre-systematic commonsense/scientific framework distinction. The Manifest Image is not identical to the commonsense framework; nor is the Scientific Image identical to the scientific framework. In this paper I will concern myself only with arguing that the (...) Image is not identical to the commonsense framework. (shrink)
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  21. John Collier, The Prospects for Reconciling Sellars' Images: Forty Years Later.score: 128.0
    Wilfrid Sellars (1963) described his Manifest Image and Scientific Image as (roughly) idealizations of our common sense and scientific views of the world, including our own special role in the world as humans. If, as Sellars suggested, there is an irreconcilable conflict between these images, it may not be possible to reconcile science with common sense. The Scientific Image, as we have inherited it, has a strong reductionist element that seems to imply that things are (...)
     
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  22. J. Collier (2010). Prospects for Reconciling Sellars' World Images. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (4).score: 128.0
    Almost fifty years ago Wilfrid Sellars described two competing ways of imagining the world, the Manifest Image and the Scientific Image. The Manifest Image is an idealization of common sense aided by critical philosophy, whereas the Scientific Image is the product of our best science. The methodologies of the two images are very different: the Manifest Image deals with experience and looks only at relations among bits of experience and analysis of experience into the (...)
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  23. Bernard J. Baars (1996). When Are Images Conscious? The Curious Disconnection Between Imagery and Consciousness in the Scientific Literature. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):261-264.score: 120.0
  24. E. M. Adams (1971). The Scientific and the Humanistic Images of Man-in-the-World. Man and World 4 (2):174-192.score: 120.0
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  25. Sascha Talmor (1991). Images of Science: Scientific Practice and the Public. History of European Ideas 13 (6):825-829.score: 120.0
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  26. David P. McCabe & Alan D. Castel (2008). Seeing is Believing: The Effect of Brain Images on Judgments of Scientific Reasoning. Cognition 107 (1):343-352.score: 120.0
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  27. Alan G. Gross (2011). A Model for the Division of Semiotic Labor in Scientific Argument: The Interaction of Words and Images. Science in Context 24 (4):517-544.score: 120.0
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  28. Marianne Van den Wijngaard (forthcoming). The Acceptance of Scientific Theories and Images of Masculinity and Femininity: 1959-±1985. Journal of the History of Biology.score: 120.0
  29. Mortimer J. Adler (1971). The Scientific and the Humanistic Images of Man-in-the-World. Man and World 4:174-192.score: 120.0
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  30. Pirjo Mikkola (1982). The Scientific Community and the Images of Legal Science: An Empirical Survey of the Paradigms in Finnish Legal Science. Oikeustieteellisen Tutkimuksen Tutkimus.score: 120.0
     
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  31. Michael Quante (2000). Manifest Versus Scientific Worldview: Uniting the Perspectives. Epistemologia 23 (2):211-242.score: 120.0
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  32. T. M. Thomas (1974). Images of Man: A Philosophic and Scientific Inquiry. Dharmaram Publications.score: 120.0
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  33. Robert Rosenberger (2013). Mediating Mars: Perceptual Experience and Scientific Imaging Technologies. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (1):75-91.score: 117.3
    The philosophical tradition of phenomenology, with its focus on human bodily perception, can be used to explore the ways scientific instrumentation shapes a user’s experience. Building on Don Ihde’s account of technological embodiment, I develop a framework of concepts for articulating the experience of image interpretation in science. These concepts can be of practical value to the analysis of scientific debates over image interpretation for the ways they draw out the relationships between the image-making processes and the rival (...)
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  34. Jaap van Brakel (1996). Interdiscourse or Supervenience Relations: The Primacy of the Manifest Image. Synthese 106 (2):253-97.score: 114.0
    Amidst the progress being made in the various (sub-)disciplines of the behavioural and brain sciences a somewhat neglected subject is the problem of how everything fits into one world and, derivatively, how the relation between different levels of discourse should be understood and to what extent different levels, domains, approaches, or disciplines are autonomous or dependent. In this paper I critically review the most recent proposals to specify the nature of interdiscourse relations, focusing on the concept of supervenience. Ideally supervenience (...)
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  35. J. Brakel (1996). Interdiscourse or Supervenience Relations: The Primacy of the Manifest Image. Synthese 106 (2):253 - 297.score: 108.0
    Amidst the progress being made in the various (sub-)disciplines of the behavioural and brain sciences a somewhat neglected subject is the problem of how everything fits into one world and, derivatively, how the relation between different levels of discourse should be understood and to what extent different levels, domains, approaches, or disciplines are autonomous or dependent. In this paper I critically review the most recent proposals to specify the nature of interdiscourse relations, focusing on the concept of supervenience. Ideally supervenience (...)
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  36. Helge Malmgren (2004). The Manifest Image. In Christer Svennerlind (ed.), Ursus Philosophicus - Essays Dedicated to Björn Haglund on his Sixtieth Birthday. Philosophical Communications.score: 96.0
    It is often stated that the image of the world which our senses present to us contradicts the scientific worldview in important respects. I challenge this position through a number of arguments centered on the nature of perception and of perceived qualities.
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  37. Alex Byrne (2006). Color and the Mind-Body Problem. Dialectica 60 (2):223-44.score: 87.0
    b>: there is no “mind-body problem”, or “hard problem of consciousness”; if there is a hard problem of something, it is the problem of reconciling the manifest and scientific images.
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  38. J. Schaffer (2010). Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited, Edited by Huw Price and Richard Corry. Mind 119 (475):844-848.score: 87.0
    This is an outstanding anthology. It contains extended reflections on Russell’s idea that our notion of causation is a relic of stone-age metaphysics, which fails to fit contemporary physics and thus deserves elimination (‘On the Notion of Cause’, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 13, 1913, pp. 1–26). It will be of interest to anyone interested in causation or the physical image of the world, and to anyone interested in reconciling the manifest and scientific images.
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  39. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 87.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  40. T. Parent, Neo-Sellarsian Metaphilosophy.score: 87.0
    Science often conflicts with our everyday experience. For instance, we typically assume the existence of agency, norms, etc.—yet such things are absent from scientific theory. For Sellars, philosophy’s aim is to resolve these discrepancies between the “manifest” and “scientificimages. However, some might protest that philosophers should not “negotiate” ontology with science—the scientific image should instead claim hegemony. I defend the Sellarsian by arguing that we are simply unable to jettison central parts of the “ (...) image.” That is so, even if these parts are false. If we are stuck with them, moreover, then the Sellarsian cannot be blamed for trying to reconcile them with science, even if this is less than scientifically ideal. The “inescapability” thesis is argued by suggesting that the question ‘What should I do?’ is “forced” in roughly William James’ sense. Very briefly, whatever you do rationally commits you to your act being what you should do—which in turn, assumes the existence of norms. So in that sense norms are “inescapable.” The argument is then extended to show that a commitment to belief is similarly inescapable. (shrink)
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  41. Daniel C. Dennett (2013). Bestiary of the Manifest Image. In Don Ross, James Ladyman & Harold Kincaid (eds.), Scientific Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 96.score: 87.0
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  42. Tibor Solymosi (2011). Neuropragmatism, Old and New. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):347-368.score: 81.0
    Recent work in neurophilosophy has either made reference to the work of John Dewey or independently developed positions similar to it. I review these developments in order first to show that Dewey was indeed doing neurophilosophy well before the Churchlands and others, thereby preceding many other mid-twentieth century European philosophers’ views on cognition to whom many present day philosophers refer (e.g., Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). I also show that Dewey’s work provides useful tools for evading or overcoming many issues in contemporary neurophilosophy (...)
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  43. Alexander R. Galloway (2013). Laruelle and Art. Continent 2 (4):230-236.score: 81.0
    In the early 1990s François Laruelle wrote an essay on James Turrell, the American artist known for his use of light and space. 1 While it briefly mentions Turrell's Roden Crater and is cognizant of his other work, the essay focuses on a series of twenty aquatint etchings made by Turrell called First Light (1989-1990). Designed to stand alone as prints, First Light nevertheless acts as a kind of backward glance revisiting and meditating on earlier corner light projections made by (...)
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  44. A. Staley Groves (2012). A New Negentropic Subject: Reviewing Michel Serres' Biogea. Continent 2 (2):155-158.score: 81.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 155–158 Michel Serres. Biogea . Trans. Randolph Burks. Minneapolis: Univocal Publishing. 2012. 200 pp. | ISBN 9781937561086 | $22.95 Conveying to potential readers the significance of a book puts me at risk of glad handing. It’s not in my interest to laud the undeserving, especially on the pages of this journal. This is not a sales pitch, but rather an affirmation of a necessary work on very troubled terms: human, earth, nature, and the problematic world we made. (...)
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  45. Catherine Allamel-Raffin (2011). The Meaning of a Scientific Image: Case Study in Nanoscience a Semiotic Approach. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (2):165-173.score: 78.7
    This paper proposes a new approach for analysing daily activities in a laboratory. The case study presented is an analysis of shop-talk around a microscope. In addition to the classical approaches, such as ethnomethodology and anthropology of science, I argue that a microsemiotic approach could be useful to better understand what is at stake. The semiotic approach I shall use here was proposed by a group of Belgian semioticians: Groupe μ. This semiotic approach leads to a constructivist point of view: (...)
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  46. Letitia Meynell (2013). Parsing Pictures: On Analyzing the Content of Images in Science. The Knowledge Engineering Review 28 (3): 327-345.score: 70.0
    In this paper I tackle the question of what basic form an analytical method for articulating and ultimately assessing visual representations should take. I start from the assumption that scientific images, being less prone to interpretive complication than artworks, are ideal objects from which to engage this question. I then assess a recent application of Nelson Goodman's aesthetics to the project of parsing scientific images, Laura Perini's ‘The truth in pictures’. I argue that, although her project (...)
     
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  47. Annamaria Carusi (2012). Making the Visual Visible in Philosophy of Science. Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):106-114.score: 68.0
    As data-intensive and computational science become increasingly established as the dominant mode of conducting scientific research, visualisations of data and of the outcomes of science become increasingly prominent in mediating knowledge in the scientific arena. This position piece advocates that more attention should be paid to the epistemological role of visualisations beyond their being a cognitive aid to understanding, but as playing a crucial role in the formation of evidence for scientific claims. The new generation of computational (...)
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  48. Ignacio Mastroleo (2011). The evaluation of scientific research in democratic societies: Kitcher, Rawls and the approach of scientific significant truths. Revista Redbioética/UNESCO 2 (4):43-60.score: 66.0
    This paper critically assesses the model of evaluation of scientific research for democratic societies defended by Philip Kitcher. The “significant truth” approach proposes a viable alternative to two classic images of science: that of the “critics”, who believe that science always serves the interests of the powerful and that of the “faithful”, who argue that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary. However, the democratic justification of Kitcher’s proposal is not compatible with the ethical (...)
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  49. J. Gregory Trafton, Susan B. Trickett & Farilee E. Mintz (2005). Connecting Internal and External Representations: Spatial Transformations of Scientific Visualizations. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 10 (1):89-106.score: 66.0
    Many scientific discoveries have depended on external diagrams or visualizations. Many scientists also report to use an internal mental representation or mental imagery to help them solve problems and reason. How do scientists connect these internal and external representations? We examined working scientists as they worked on external scientific visualizations. We coded the number and type of spatial transformations (mental operations that scientists used on internal or external representations or images) and found that there were a very (...)
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  50. Ulrich Mohrhoff (2014). Manifesting the Quantum World. Foundations of Physics 44 (6):641-677.score: 66.0
    In resisting attempts to explain the unity of a whole in terms of a multiplicity of interacting parts, quantum mechanics calls for an explanatory concept that proceeds in the opposite direction: from unity to multiplicity. Being part of the Scientific Image of the world, the theory concerns the process by which (the physical aspect of) what Sellars called the Manifest Image of the world comes into being. This process consists in the progressive differentiation of an intrinsically undifferentiated entity. (...)
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