Search results for 'Manuscripts, Chinese' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth W. Holloway (2009). Guodian: The Newly Discovered Seeds of Chinese Religious and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 51.0
    In 300 BCE, the tutor of the heir-apparent to the Chu throne was laid to rest in a tomb at Jingmen, Hubei province in central China. A corpus of bamboo-strip texts that recorded the philosophical teachings of an era was buried with him. The tomb was sealed, and China quickly became the theater of the Qin conquest, an event that proved to be one of the most significant in ancient history. For over two millennia, the texts were forgotten. But in (...)
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  2. Carine Defoort (2013). Excavated Manuscripts and Political Thought: Cao Feng on Early Chinese Texts: Editor's Introduction. Contemporary Chinese Thought: Translations and Studies 44.score: 39.0
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  3. Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) (2010). Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 39.0
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
     
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  4. Carine Defoort (2013). Excavated Manuscripts and Political Thought: Cao Feng on Early Chinese Texts. Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (4):3-9.score: 39.0
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  5. Imre Galambos (2011). Popular Character Forms (Súzì) and Semantic Compound (Huìyì) Characters in Medieval Chinese Manuscripts. Journal of the American Oriental Society 131 (3):395-409.score: 36.0
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  6. Sarah Allan, Crispin Williams & Laozi (eds.) (2000). The Guodian Laozi: Proceedings of the International Conference, Dartmouth College, May 1998. Society for the Study of Early China and Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California.score: 30.0
     
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  7. Feng Cao (2010). Chu di Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Xian Qin Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Taiwan Shu Fang Chu Ban You Xian Gong Si.score: 30.0
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  8. Lai Chen (2009). Zhu Bo "Wu Xing" Yu Jian Bo Yan Jiu. Sheng Huo, du Shu, Xin Zhi San Lian Shu Dian.score: 30.0
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  9. Sixin Ding (ed.) (2002). Chu di Chu Tu Jian Bo Wen Xian Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Hubei Jiao Yu Chu Ban She.score: 30.0
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  10. Sixin Ding & Shihua Xia (eds.) (2005). Chu di Jian Bo Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Chong Wen Shu Ju.score: 30.0
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  11. Lihua Guo (2008). Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Xian Qin Ru Dao Zhe Xue. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.score: 30.0
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  12. Tao Liang & Yunlong Si (eds.) (2012). Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Jun Zi Shen Du: Shen du Wen Ti Tao Lun Ji. Li Jiang Chu Ban She.score: 30.0
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  13. Tao Liang (2008). Guodian Zhu Jian Yu Si Meng Xue Pai =. Zhongguo Ren Min da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 30.0
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  14. Xiaoguang Li (2009). Zhongguo Xian Qin Zhi Xin Yang Yu Yu Zhou Lun: Yi "Tai Yi Sheng Shui" Wei Zhong Xin de Kao Cha. Ba Shu Shu She.score: 30.0
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  15. Zhongjiang Wang (2011). Jian Bo Wen Ming Yu Gu Dai Si Xiang Shi Jie. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 30.0
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  16. Qipeng Wei (2004). Mawangdui Han Mu Bo Shu "Huang di Shu" Jian Zheng. Zhonghua Shu Ju.score: 30.0
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  17. Yaoting Xie (2011). Cong Chu Tu Jian Bo Kan Si Meng Xue Pai de Nei Sheng Wai Wang Si Xiang. Ke Xue Chu Ban She.score: 30.0
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  18. Junzhi Xie (2008). Guodian Chu Jian Ru Jia Zhe Xue Yan Jiu. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.score: 30.0
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  19. Robin D. S. Yates (ed.) (1997). Five Lost Classics: Tao, Huanglao, and Yin-Yang in Han China. Ballantine Books.score: 30.0
  20. Keqian Xu (2012). A Synthetic Comprehension of the Way of Zhong in Early Confucian Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):422-438.score: 12.0
    Zhong 中 is a very important philosophical concept in early Confucianism. Both the received ancient Confucian classics and the newly discovered ancient bamboo manuscripts tell us that adhering to the principle of zhong was an important charge that had been transmitted and inherited by early ancient Chinese political leaders from generation to generation. Confucius and his followers adopted the concept of zhong and further developed it into a sophisticated doctrine, which is usually called zhongdao 中道 (the Way of zhong) (...)
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  21. Paul Williams & Patrice Ladwig (eds.) (2012). Buddhist Funeral Cultures of Southeast Asia and China. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Buddhist funeral cultures of Southeast Asia and China Patrice Ladwig and Paul Williams; 2. Chanting as 'bricolage technique': a comparison of South and Southeast Asian funeral recitation Rita Langer; 3. Weaving life out of death: the craft of the rag robe in Cambodian ritual technology Erik W. Davis; 4. Corpses and cloth: illustrations of the pasukula ceremony in Thai manuscripts M. L. Pattaratorn Chirapravati; 5. Good death, bad death and ritual restructurings: the New Year ceremonies (...)
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  22. Ge Zhaoguang (2002). How Many More Mysteries Are There in Ancient China?: After Reading Li Xueqin's Lost Bamboo Slips and Silk Manuscripts and the History of Learning. Contemporary Chinese Thought 34 (2):75-91.score: 12.0
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  23. Xing Wen & Peng Guoxiang (2011). Chen Lai's Four Essays on the "Wuxing" Manuscripts. Contemporary Chinese Thought 43 (2):3-5.score: 12.0
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  24. Robert F. Brown (ed.) (2009). Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy. OUP Oxford.score: 12.0
    The Hegel Lectures Series -/- Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered (...)
     
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  25. Carine Defoort & Excavated Manuscripts (2013). Volume 44 (Fall 2012–Summer 2013). Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (4):93-94.score: 6.0
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  26. Stevan Harnad (2003). Minds, Machines, and Searle 2: What's Right and Wrong About the Chinese Room Argument. In John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.score: 5.0
    When in 1979 Zenon Pylyshyn, associate editor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences (BBS, a peer commentary journal which I edit) informed me that he had secured a paper by John Searle with the unprepossessing title of [XXXX], I cannot say that I was especially impressed; nor did a quick reading of the brief manuscript -- which seemed to be yet another tedious "Granny Objection"[1] about why/how we are not computers -- do anything to upgrade that impression.
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  27. JeeLoo Liu, Converting Chinese Philosophy Into the Analytic Context.score: 5.0
    Chinese philosophy has its roots in religion, and has spread to the general Chinese public as a mixture of attitudes in life, cultural spirit, as well as religious practices. However, Chinese philosophy is not just a collection of wisdom on life or a religious discourse on how to lead a good life; it is also a form of philosophy. And yet its philosophical import has often been slighted in the Western philosophical world. Two hundred years ago, Hegel (...)
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  28. Kai-Yee Wong, Weakness of Will, the Background, and Chinese Thought.score: 5.0
    This essay applies John Searle’s account of weakness of will to explore the classical Chinese problem of weak-willed action. Searle’s discussion focuses on the shortcomings of the Western classical model of rationality in explaining weakness of will, so he naturally says little about the practical ethical problem of overcoming weak-willed action, the focus of the relevant Chinese texts. Yet his theory of action, specifically his notion of the Background, suggests a compelling approach to the practical issue, one that (...)
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  29. Chris Fraser, Weakness of Will, the Background, and Chinese Thought.score: 5.0
    This essay applies John Searle’s account of weakness of will to explore the classical Chinese problem of weak-willed action. Searle’s discussion focuses on the shortcomings of the Western classical model of rationality in explaining weakness of will, so he naturally says little about the practical ethical problem of overcoming weak-willed action, the focus of the relevant Chinese texts. Yet his theory of action, specifically his notion of the Background, suggests a compelling approach to the practical issue, one that (...)
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  30. Alan Fox, The Aesthetics of Justice: Harmony and Order in Chinese Thought.score: 5.0
    In his A Theory of Justice, John Rawls suggests that a society's notion of justice informs its distribution of rights, obligations, and goods. For him, "justice as fairness" ensures that the principles dictating this distribution be agreed upon fairly. I will argue that there is no exact parallel in the Chinese tradition to what Rawls is calling "justice as fairness." Instead, we see serving a similar purpose an emphasis on the regulation of harmonious processes within the body of society. (...)
     
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  31. Chris Fraser, Action and Agency in Early Chinese Thought.score: 5.0
    In this lecture, I present a sketch of how action and agency are conceived of in pre-Qín 先秦, or classical, Chinese thought, along the way drawing some contrasts with familiar Western conceptions of action. I will also comment briefly on how the ideas I present might affect our interpretation of early Chinese texts and how they might help us to relate early Chinese thought to contemporary action theory and ethics.
     
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  32. Jay David Atlas, What is It Like to Be a Chinese Room?score: 4.0
    When philosophers think about mental phenomena, they focus on several features of human experience: (1) the existence of consciousness, (2) the intentionality of mental states, that property by which beliefs, desires, anger, etc. are directed at, are about, or refer to objects and states of affairs, (3) subjectivity, characterized by my feeling my pains but not yours, by my experiencing the world and myself from my point of view and not yours, (4) mental causation, that thoughts and feelings have physical (...)
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  33. Stevan Harnad, Searle's Chinese Room Argument.score: 4.0
    Computationalism. According to computationalism, to explain how the mind works, cognitive science needs to find out what the right computations are -- the same ones that the brain performs in order to generate the mind and its capacities. Once we know that, then every system that performs those computations will have those mental states: Every computer that runs the mind's program will have a mind, because computation is hardware independent : Any hardware that is running the right program has the (...)
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  34. Mark Sprevak, Algorithms and the Chinese Room.score: 4.0
     
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  35. Chinese National Human Genome Cente (2004). Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (A Recommended Manuscript). Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):47-54.score: 4.0
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  36. Charles Muller, Essence-Function and Interpenetration: Early Chinese Origins and Manifestations.score: 4.0
    This is the second in a series of articles on the role of the concepts of essence-function t'i-yung 體用) and interpenetration t'ung-ta 通達) in traditional East Asian religious and philosophical thought. The first installment of this series, entitled "The Composition of Self-Transformation Thought in Classical East Asian Philosophy and Religion." Bulletin of Toyo Gakuen University, vol. 4, March, 1996), was a general introduction to the two concepts. The present article treats their appearance in the earliest Confucian classics, including the I (...)
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  37. Sarah Allan (2010). Abdication and Utopian Vision in the Bamboo Slip Manuscript, Rongchengshi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):67-84.score: 4.0
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  38. Chinese National Human Genome Center at ShanghaiEthics Committee (2004). Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (a Recommended Manuscript). Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1).score: 4.0
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  39. Barkley Rosser, Nonlinear Bubbles in Chinese Stock Markets in the 1990s.score: 4.0
    A time series of the Shanghai stock index in China for the 1990s is studied for the possible existence of nonlinear speculative bubbles. Three alternative specifications of fundamentals are estimated using VAR models of domestic and international variables. These are subjected to regime switching tests and rescaled range analysis tests. Nulls of no persistence were mostly rejected, suggesting the strong possibility of bubbles. Nonlinearities beyond ARCH effects using the BDS test could not be rejected. The paper also discusses the special (...)
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  40. Pang Pu (2000). A Comparison of the Bamboo Slip and the Silk Manuscript Wu Xing. Contemporary Chinese Thought 32 (1):50-57.score: 4.0
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  41. Jao Tsung-I. (1980). Notes on Li-Shih Chi-Chuan_: The Discovery of an Unpublished Manuscript of Li Chih's _Ts'ang-Shu. Chinese Studies in History 13 (1):100-112.score: 4.0
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  42. Roy Sorensen, Do Butterflies Dream?score: 2.0
    If people never dreamed, would it make a difference to how they picture reality? Or themselves? Philosophers would certainly lose the most natural way of introducing skepticism. The Chinese Taoist, Chuang Tzu (369 B. C. - ?), dreamt he was a butterfly. When he awoke he wondered whether he was a man who dreamt he was butterfly or a butterfly now dreaming he is a man. Any experience can be explained as either a faithful representation of the world or (...)
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  43. Chris Swoyer, The Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis.score: 2.0
    Many linguists, including Noam Chomsky, contend that language in the sense we ordinary think of it, in the sense that people in Germany speak German, is a historical or social or political notion, rather than a scientific one. For example, German and Dutch are much closer to one another than various dialects of Chinese are. But the rough, commonsense divisions between languages will suffice for our purposes.
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  44. Joseph Agassi, Brainwashing.score: 2.0
    The word "brain-washing", translated from Chinese communist jargon, is a very strong metaphor, first popularized by Robert Jay Lifto n. It vividly describes one person interfering with the personality make-up of another, removing the other's ideology and replacing it, and similarly tampering with the other's tastes, pool of information to rely upon and whatever else goes into the make-up of the other's personality. Clearly, in some sense or another everyone interferes with the personality of people with whom they interact; (...)
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  45. John M. Hobson & Rajiv Malhotra, Rediscovering Indian Civilization: Indian Contributions to the Rise of the Modern West.score: 2.0
    This paper presents a challenge to Eurocentric world history on the grounds that it reifies and exaggerates the role of the West in the creation of modernity, while simultaneously ignoring India's seminal contributions. The groundwork is prepared in the first three sections, which refute the parochial biases of Eurocentrism by revealing India's impressive early developmental record and its place near the center of a nascent global economy. The paper culminates in an approach that places the "dialogue of civilizations" center-stage of (...)
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  46. Chien-Hsing Ho, Emptiness as Subject-Object Unity: Sengzhao on the Way Things Truly Are.score: 2.0
    Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a leading Chinese Mādhyamika philosopher, holds that the myriad things are empty, and that they are, at bottom, the same as emptiness qua the way things truly are. In this paper, I distinguish the level of the myriad things from that of the way things truly are and call them, respectively, the ontic and the ontological levels. For Sengzhao, the myriad things at the ontic level are indeterminate and empty, and he equates the way things truly (...)
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  47. Charles Muller, The Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment: Korean Buddhism's Guide to Meditation.score: 2.0
    These, and many other related questions have continued to rise in the minds of meditation practitioners of Chan, Sôn and Zen Buddhism since the earliest stages in the development of these traditions, and it is in response to such questions that the Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment (Chinese: Yuanjue jing ) was composed. In addition to detailed guidance on the undertaking of Chan contemplation, the sutra offers concise discussions of the fundamental philosophical grounds which underlie such practices, in the (...)
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  48. Joseph Agassi, Kwan Lihuen on Agassi in Education.score: 2.0
    to read this you need Chinese characters.
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  49. Charles Muller, Patterns of Religion.score: 2.0
    Patterns of Religion is an introduction to the religions of the world with an emphasis on seven of the most influential traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. The book also includes chapters on ancient patterns of spirituality and tribal religions in historical times; an epilogue on millennial religions; and appendixes on Jainism, Sikhism, Shinto, and the Web sites of the religions that are the subjects of the text. Other, traditions such as Zoroastrianism and Chinese; folk religions (...)
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  50. Maria Bittner, From Mandarin Texts to Update with Centering.score: 2.0
    Simple Mandarin Chinese texts translated into Update with Centering. Notes toward a directly compositional fragment of Mandarin Chinese, combining Categorial Grammar with Update with Centering, to appear in Bittner (in prep.) "Temporality: Universals and Variation".
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