Search results for 'Manuscripts, Chinese' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Carine Defoort (2013). Excavated Manuscripts and Political Thought: Cao Feng on Early Chinese Texts. Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (4):3-9.
    This issue presents the research on early Chinese texts by Cao Feng, a philosophy professor at Tsinghua University. He is an expert in early Chinese political philosophy and philosophy of language found in transmitted and excavated texts. His extensive education in Japan has left him well versed in Japanese sinology. Although a critical researcher in the field of early Chinese thought and a very prolific writer in both Chinese and Japanese, Cao Feng is little known in (...)
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  2.  1
    Carine Defoort (2013). Excavated Manuscripts and Political Thought: Cao Feng on Early Chinese Texts: Editor's Introduction. Contemporary Chinese Thought: Translations and Studies 44 (4):3-9.
    This issue presents the research on early Chinese texts by Cao Feng, a philosophy professor at Tsinghua University. He is an expert in early Chinese political philosophy and philosophy of language found in transmitted and excavated texts. His extensive education in Japan has left him well versed in Japanese sinology. Although a critical researcher in the field of early Chinese thought and a very prolific writer in both Chinese and Japanese, Cao Feng is little known in (...)
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  3. Imre Galambos (2011). Popular Character Forms (Súzì) and Semantic Compound (Huìyì) Characters in Medieval Chinese Manuscripts. Journal of the American Oriental Society 131 (3):395-409.
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  4.  8
    Kenneth W. Holloway (2009). Guodian: The Newly Discovered Seeds of Chinese Religious and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    In 300 BCE, the tutor of the heir-apparent to the Chu throne was laid to rest in a tomb at Jingmen, Hubei province in central China. A corpus of bamboo-strip texts that recorded the philosophical teachings of an era was buried with him. The tomb was sealed, and China quickly became the theater of the Qin conquest, an event that proved to be one of the most significant in ancient history. For over two millennia, the texts were forgotten. But in (...)
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  5. Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) (2010). Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts. Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
     
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  6. Sarah Allan, Crispin Williams & Laozi (eds.) (2000). The Guodian Laozi: Proceedings of the International Conference, Dartmouth College, May 1998. Society for the Study of Early China and Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California.
     
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  7. Feng Cao (2010). Chu di Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Xian Qin Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Taiwan Shu Fang Chu Ban You Xian Gong Si.
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  8. Lai Chen (2009). Zhu Bo "Wu Xing" Yu Jian Bo Yan Jiu. Sheng Huo, du Shu, Xin Zhi San Lian Shu Dian.
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  9. Sixin Ding (ed.) (2002). Chu di Chu Tu Jian Bo Wen Xian Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Hubei Jiao Yu Chu Ban She.
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  10. Sixin Ding & Shihua Xia (eds.) (2005). Chu di Jian Bo Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Chong Wen Shu Ju.
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  11. Lihua Guo (2008). Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Xian Qin Ru Dao Zhe Xue. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  12. Tao Liang & Yunlong Si (eds.) (2012). Chu Tu Wen Xian Yu Jun Zi Shen Du: Shen du Wen Ti Tao Lun Ji. Li Jiang Chu Ban She.
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  13. Tao Liang (2008). Guodian Zhu Jian Yu Si Meng Xue Pai =. Zhongguo Ren Min da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  14. Xiaoguang Li (2009). Zhongguo Xian Qin Zhi Xin Yang Yu Yu Zhou Lun: Yi "Tai Yi Sheng Shui" Wei Zhong Xin de Kao Cha. Ba Shu Shu She.
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  15. Zhongjiang Wang (2011). Jian Bo Wen Ming Yu Gu Dai Si Xiang Shi Jie. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  16. Qipeng Wei (2004). Mawangdui Han Mu Bo Shu "Huang di Shu" Jian Zheng. Zhonghua Shu Ju.
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  17. Yaoting Xie (2011). Cong Chu Tu Jian Bo Kan Si Meng Xue Pai de Nei Sheng Wai Wang Si Xiang. Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
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  18. Junzhi Xie (2008). Guodian Chu Jian Ru Jia Zhe Xue Yan Jiu. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  19. Robin D. S. Yates (ed.) (1997). Five Lost Classics: Tao, Huanglao, and Yin-Yang in Han China. Ballantine Books.
     
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  20. Edward L. Shaughnessy (2014). Unearthing the Changes: Recently Discovered Manuscripts of the Yi Jing and Related Texts. Cup.
    In recent years, three ancient manuscripts relating to the _Yi jin_g, or _Classic of Changes_, have been discovered. The earliest--the Shanghai Museum Zhou Yi--dates to about 300 B.C.E. and shows evidence of the text's original circulation. The _Guicang_, or _Returning to Be Stored_, reflects another ancient Chinese divination tradition based on hexagrams similar to those of the _Yi jing_. In 1993, two manuscripts were found in a third-century B.C.E. tomb at Wangjiatai that contain almost exact parallels to the _Guicang_'s (...)
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  21. R. P. Peerenboom (1990). Law and Morality in Ancient China: The Silk Manuscripts of Huang-Lao. Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    The 1973 archeological discovery of important documents of classical thought known as the Huang-Lao Boshu coupled with advancements in contemporary jurisprudence make possible a reassessment of the philosophies of pre-Qin and early Han China. This study attempts to elucidate the importance of the Huang-Lao school within the intellectual tradition of China through a comparison of the Boshu's philosophical position, particularly its understanding of the relation between law and morality, with the respective views of major thinkers of the period--Confucius, Han Fei, (...)
     
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  22.  14
    Ge Zhaoguang (2002). How Many More Mysteries Are There in Ancient China?: After Reading Li Xueqin's Lost Bamboo Slips and Silk Manuscripts and the History of Learning. Contemporary Chinese Thought 34 (2):75-91.
    As historiographical studies on ancient China gradually move from the center to the margins of the public's field of vision, research on historiographical studies concerning ancient China have been undergoing some unusual changes. A truly considerable quantity of bamboo slip and silk manuscripts have either been discovered by archaeologists or accidentally unearthed in the last twenty years. Although these have been made public very slowly, even maddeningly so, the few of them that have appeared before the world in the course (...)
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  23.  11
    Xing Wen & Peng Guoxiang (2011). Chen Lai's Four Essays on the "Wuxing" Manuscripts. Contemporary Chinese Thought 43 (2):3-5.
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  24.  41
    Wing-tsit Chan (1963). A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    This Source Book is devoted to the purpose of providing such a basis for genuine understanding of Chinese thought (and thereby of Chinese life and culture, ...
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  25.  38
    Chad Hansen (1992). A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought: A Philosophical Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    This ambitious book presents a new interpretation of Chinese thought guided both by a philosopher's sense of mystery and by a sound philosophical theory of meaning. That dual goal, Hansen argues, requires a unified translation theory. It must provide a single coherent account of the issues that motivated both the recently untangled Chinese linguistic analysis and the familiar moral-political disputes. Hansen's unified approach uncovers a philosophical sophistication in Daoism that traditional accounts have overlooked. The Daoist theory (...)
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  26.  90
    Kwong-loi Shun (1997). Mencius and Early Chinese Thought. Stanford University Press.
    Throughout much of Chinese history, Mencius (372-289 BC) was considered the greatest Confucian thinker after Confucius himself. Following the enshrinement of the Mencius (an edited compilation of his thought by disciples) as one of the Four Books by Sung neo-Confucianists, he was studied by all educated Chinese. This book begins a reassessment of Mencius by studying his ethical thinking in relation to that of other early Chinese thinkers, including Confucius, Mo Tzu, the Yangists, and (...)
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  27.  16
    Christian Helmut Wenzel (2010). How Pictorial is Chinese? And Does It Matter? Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 18:317-319.
    It has often been said that the Chinese script is pictorial or ideographic, and that this is one of the reasons why Chinese tend to think more analogically than logically, and why in the past the natural sciences developed to a lesser degree in China than in the West. These are strong claims. They have often been oversimplified and exaggerated, but I think there is something to be said for them. Here I will focus on the first question. (...)
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  28. Ferdinand A. Gul, Andy Y. Ng & Marian Yew Jen Wu Tong (2003). Chinese Auditors' Ethical Behavior in an Audit Conflict Situation. Journal of Business Ethics 42 (4):379 - 392.
    This paper draws on the economics of ethical compliance model to examine the association between ethical reasoning, perceived risk of detection, perceived levels of penalties and Chinese auditors'' ethical behavior in an audit conflict situation. Using 53 Chinese auditors from Shenzen as subjects, and a survey questionnaire, this study found that there is a significant negative association between ethical reasoning and the likelihood of unethical behavior and that this negative association is weaker for auditors who perceive (...)
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  29.  18
    Brian Bruya (2015). The Tacit Rejection of Multiculturalism in American Philosophy Ph.D. Programs: The Case of Chinese Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):369-389.
    At the confluence of the philosophy of education and social/political philosophy lies the question of how we should educate the next generation of philosophy professors. Part of the question involves how broad such an education should be in order to educate teachers with the ability to, themselves, educate citizens competent to function in a diverse, globalized world. As traditional Western education systems from elementary schools through universities have embraced multicultural sources over the last few decades, philosophy Ph.D. programs have bucked (...)
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  30. Keqian Xu (2010). Chinese “Dao” and Western “Truth”: A Comparative and Dynamic Perspective. Asian Social Science 6 (12):8.
    In the Pre-Qin time, pursuing “Dao” was the main task in the scholarship of most of the ancient Chinese philosophers, while the Ancient Greek philosophers considered pursuing “Truth” as their ultimate goal. While the “Dao” in ancient Chinese texts and the “Truth” in ancient Greek philosophic literature do share or cross-cover certain connotations, there are subtle and important differences between the two comparable philosophic concepts. These differences have deep and profound impact on the later development of (...)
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  31.  51
    Bala Ramasamy & Mathew Yeung (2009). Chinese Consumers' Perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):119 - 132.
    The findings of this article increase our understanding of corporate social responsibility from the consumers' perspective in a Chinese setting. Based on primary data collected via a self-administered survey in Shanghai and Hong Kong and results of similar studies conducted in Europe and the United States, we provide evidence to show that Chinese consumers are more supportive of CSR. We also show that Carroll's pyramid of responsibilities can be applied in China. We evaluated the importance placed by (...) consumers on the four responsibilities of firms - economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic - and find that economic responsibilities are most important while philanthropic responsibilities are of least importance. The nature of these differences is important for firms intending to use corporate social responsibility for strategic purposes. (shrink)
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  32.  12
    Ricky Y. K. Chan, Louis T. W. Cheng & Ricky W. F. Szeto (2002). The Dynamics of Guanxi and Ethics for Chinese Executives. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (4):327 - 336.
    This study empirically examines how Chinese executives perceive the role of guanxi and ethics played in their business operations. By factor-analyzing 850 valid replies collected from a comprehensive survey, the present study identifies three distinct ethics-related attitudes and two distinct guanxi-related attitudes for Chinese executives. The cluster analysis of the composite scores of these five attitudinal factors further indicates the existence of three distinct groups of Chinese executives that vary in their ethics and guanxi orientations. The three (...)
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  33.  35
    Chenting Su, M. Joseph Sirgy & James E. Littlefield (2003). Is Guanxi Orientation Bad, Ethically Speaking? A Study of Chinese Enterprises. Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):303 - 312.
    Guanxi as one of the key factors leading to business success in China (PRC) has ironically been synonymous with bribery. This raises some serious questions: should Western foreign firms do business in China? How should they do business with Chinese firms? This study investigated the relationship between guanxi orientation and cognitive moral development in an attempt to determine whether the level of guanxi orientation of Chinese business people affects their ethical reasoning. Based on a classification of Chinese (...)
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  34.  25
    Karyn Lai (2008). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between its traditions and interpretations (...)
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  35. A. S. Cua (ed.) (2003). Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
    Featuring contributions from the world's most highly esteemed Asian philosophy scholars, this important encyclopedia covers the complex and increasingly influential field of Chinese thought, from earliest recorded times to the present day. Including coverage on the subject previously unavailable to English speakers, the Encyclopedia sheds light on the extensive range of concepts, movements, philosophical works, and thinkers that populate the field. It includes a thorough survey of the history of Chinese philosophy; entries on all major thinkers from Confucius (...)
     
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  36.  23
    George Lan, Zhenzhong Ma, JianAn Cao & He Zhang (2009). A Comparison of Personal Values of Chinese Accounting Practitioners and Students. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):59 - 76.
    This study examines the personal values and value types of Chinese accounting practitioners and students, using the values survey questionnaire developed and validated by Schwartz (1992, Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 25, 1–65). A total of 454 accounting practitioners and 126 graduate accounting students participated in the study. The results show that Healthy, Family Security, Self-Respect, and Honoring of Parents and Elders are the top four values for both accounting practitioners and accounting students, although these values are not ranked (...)
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  37.  10
    Christian Helmut Wenzel (2009). Chinese Ways of Words. Institut International de Philosophie 5:119-126.
    According to the so-called Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, a language influences the mind of its user. This is more or less trivial, but the problems are in the details. It is difficult to make precise what those influences are, be it in general philosophical or in particular empirical-cultural terms. I will give an account of what I take to be basic aesthetic and grammatical features of the Chinese language compared with what we find in Western languages such as Latin or greek. (...)
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  38. Robert I. Damper (2004). The Chinese Room Argument--Dead but Not yet Buried. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (5-6):159-169.
    This article is an accompaniment to Anthony Freeman’s review of Views into the Chinese Room, reflecting on some pertinent outstanding questions about the Chinese room argument. Although there is general agreement in the artificial intelligence community that the CRA is somehow wrong, debate continues on exactly why and how it is wrong. Is there a killer counter-argument and, if so, what is it? One remarkable fact is that the CRA is prototypically a thought experiment, yet it has been (...)
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  39.  11
    Yongyan Li (2013). Text-Based Plagiarism in Scientific Writing: What Chinese Supervisors Think About Copying and How to Reduce It in Students' Writing. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):569-583.
    Text-based plagiarism, or textual copying, typically in the form of replicating or patchwriting sentences in a row from sources, seems to be an issue of growing concern among scientific journal editors. Editors have emphasized that senior authors (typically supervisors of science students) should take the responsibility for educating novices against text-based plagiarism. To address a research gap in the literature as to how scientist supervisors perceive the issue of textual copying and what they do in educating their students, this paper (...)
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  40. Ricardo Restrepo (2012). Computers, Persons, and the Chinese Room. Part 1: The Human Computer. Journal of Mind and Behavior 33 (1):27-48.
    Detractors of Searle’s Chinese Room Argument have arrived at a virtual consensus that the mental properties of the Man performing the computations stipulated by the argument are irrelevant to whether computational cognitive science is true. This paper challenges this virtual consensus to argue for the first of the two main theses of the persons reply, namely, that the mental properties of the Man are what matter. It does this by challenging many of the arguments and conceptions put forth by (...)
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  41. Michael J. Shaffer (2009). A Logical Hole in the Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 19 (2):229-235.
    Searle’s Chinese Room Argument (CRA) has been the object of great interest in the philosophy of mind, artificial intelligence and cognitive science since its initial presentation in ‘Minds, Brains and Programs’ in 1980. It is by no means an overstatement to assert that it has been a main focus of attention for philosophers and computer scientists of many stripes. It is then especially interesting to note that relatively little has been said about the detailed logic of the argument, whatever (...)
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  42. Larry Hauser (1997). Searle's Chinese Box: Debunking the Chinese Room Argument. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (2):199-226.
    John Searle's Chinese room argument is perhaps the most influential andwidely cited argument against artificial intelligence (AI). Understood astargeting AI proper – claims that computers can think or do think– Searle's argument, despite its rhetorical flash, is logically andscientifically a dud. Advertised as effective against AI proper, theargument, in its main outlines, is an ignoratio elenchi. It musterspersuasive force fallaciously by indirection fostered by equivocaldeployment of the phrase "strong AI" and reinforced by equivocation on thephrase "causal powers" (at (...)
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  43. William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the (...)
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  44. JeeLoo Liu (2006). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy: From Ancient Philosophy to Chinese Buddhism. Blackwell Pub..
    _An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy_ unlocks the mystery of ancient Chinese philosophy and unravels the complexity of Chinese Buddhism by placing them in the contemporary context of discourse. Elucidates the central issues and debates in Chinese philosophy, its different schools of thought, and its major philosophers. Covers eight major philosophers in the ancient period, among them Confucius, Laozi, and Zhuangzi. Illuminates the links between different schools of philosophy. Opens the door to further study of the relationship (...)
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  45.  3
    Claudia Schumann (2016). Graphic Contaminations: Cosmopolitics of the ‘I’ in American Born Chinese and Persepolis. Studier I Pædagogisk Filosofi 4 (2):38-53.
    The article explores the demands that the conflictual dimension of globalization poses for a cosmopolitan education. Such an emphasis seems necessary in times where the populations who undertake inter- and intra-national border crossings are increasingly those who are forced to: those trying to escape unbearable poverty, atrocious wars, the disenfranchised and victims of racist, sexist or religious persecution. Reflecting on the experiences articulated in the two graphic novels, Persepolis and American Born Chinese, the dimension of the globalizing world (...)
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  46.  68
    William J. Rapaport (2006). How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller ’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using (...)
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  47.  24
    Robert E. Allinson (ed.) (1989). Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots. Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from (...)
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  48.  14
    Yahya Wijaya (2008). The Prospect of Familism in the Global Era: A Study on the Recent Development of the Ethnic-Chinese Business, with Particular Attention to the Indonesian Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (3):311 - 317.
    The ethnic-Chinese business is often characterised by a central role of the family both in the structure of the firm and in its corporate culture. This has political, social as well as cultural reasons. The centrality of the family in business has its advantages and disadvantages. On the one hand, it enables a fast, efficient and flexible process of decision-making. On the other hand, it often contradicts modern business professionalism. The younger generation of ethnic-Chinese business actors tend to (...)
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  49.  14
    Ren Li (2013). Media Corruption: A Chinese Characteristic. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):297-310.
    Misbehaviour and malpractices of Chinese journalists in recent years have brought media corruption under the spotlight. The lack of professionalism and scarcity of fully established ethics in media organisations have made the case worse. However, while Chinese media and academics concentrate narrowly on paid-for news or gag fee by prompting the enforcement of disciplinary restraints and ‘thought education’, this hot issue has been largely ignored by western scholars and has only been occasionally reported by some western media. Based (...)
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  50. Jerome C. Wakefield (2003). The Chinese Room Argument Reconsidered: Essentialism, Indeterminacy, and Strong AI. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 13 (2):285-319.
    I argue that John Searle's (1980) influential Chinese room argument (CRA) against computationalism and strong AI survives existing objections, including Block's (1998) internalized systems reply, Fodor's (1991b) deviant causal chain reply, and Hauser's (1997) unconscious content reply. However, a new ``essentialist'' reply I construct shows that the CRA as presented by Searle is an unsound argument that relies on a question-begging appeal to intuition. My diagnosis of the CRA relies on an interpretation of computationalism as a scientific theory about (...)
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