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  1. Manussos Marangudakis (2013). Clarifying the Eutopia Argument: A Response to John Caiazza. Zygon 48 (1):128-130.
    The “eutopia” vision of the future, promulgated by technoscientists and libertarian thinkers, could herald the coming of a third axial age that could reshape and reformulate the legacy of the Great Religions and their transcendental moral imperatives, and of Modernity and the democratic imperative of equality of social conditions. A sociological diagnosis of a third, technosomatic, morality, is not a matter of supporting or rejecting such a possibility, but a matter of detecting its rise and regulating its impact.
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  2. Manussos Marangudakis (2012). Eutopia: The Promise of Biotechnology and the Realignment of Western Axiality. Zygon 47 (1):97-117.
    Abstract. This essay discusses the deep perceptual and social changes that the advanced applications of biotechnology could bring in the West. It examines the probable collapse of a fundamental perceptual bipolarity on which the Western mind and social mobilization have been based since its inception in the West: Athens--Jerusalem. This collapse will quite possibly radically reshape Western perceptions of self and nature and will remodel established constellations and modes of social mobilization and social organization. The radical collapse of the preceding (...)
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  3. Manussos Marangudakis (2008). On Nature, Christianity and Deep Ecology - a Response to W. S. Helton and N. D. Helton. Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):245-248.
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  4. Manussos Marangudakis (2001). The Medieval Roots of Our Environmental Crisis. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):243-260.
    Controversy about Lynn White, Jr.’s thesis that Western Christianity is to blame for the ecological crisis we face today has recently shifted to medieval social developments and how they affected theological notions of nature. Contributing to the social perspective of the debate, in this essay I examine the emergence of materialism as an effect of the relationship between the Latin Church and Western society. Rationalism and utilitarianism, two main features of Latin theology, were appropriated by medieval political and economic elites (...)
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  5. Manussos Marangudakis (1999). God or Nature? A Western Dilemma: Reply to Simon Oliver. Telos 1999 (116):119-134.
    Simon Oliver argues that the modern culture-nature divide is bound to collapse, because of the relentless expansion of technology into culture and nature.1 This breakdown could lead to a new appreciation of both, but only if the divide is replaced by a truly transcendental theology. Otherwise, culture and nature will continue to be seen as subjects and objects. Oliver raises issues crucial to the understanding of predominant cognitive categories: the durability of the culture-nature divide; its theological foundations and the prospect (...)
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  6. Manussos Marangudakis (1999). God or Nature? The Western Dilemma. Telos 31 (116):119-134.
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  7. Manussos Marangudakis (1998). Ecology as a Pseudo-Religion? Telos 1998 (112):107-124.
    Since the 1960s, the Green movement has been seen as an innovative leftist phenomenon. From the times of Peter Kropotkin,1 it has been assumed that environmental concerns belong to the Left. Recent studies, however, have shown that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries there were political ecologists associated with the radical Right.2 Some supported National Socialism, eugenics, the mystical union of mankind and nature, and other esoteric practices. Given this historical precedent, recent leftist flirtations with ecology raise a (...)
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