14 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Maralee Harrell [12]Mara Harrell [2]
See also:
Profile: Maralee Harrell (Carnegie Mellon University)
  1. Mara Harrell, No Computer Program Required: Even Pencil-and-Paper Argument Mapping Improves Critical Thinking Skills.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Maralee Harrell, Using Argument Diagramming Software to Teach Critical Thinking Skills.
    There is substantial evidence from many domains that visual representations aid various forms of cognition. We aimed to determine whether visual representations of argument structure enhanced the acquisition and development of critical thinking skills within the context of an introductory philosophy course. We found a significant effect of the use of argument diagrams, and this effect was stable even when multiple plausible correlates were controlled for. These results suggest that natural and relatively minor modifications to standard critical thinking courses could (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Mara Harrell, Creating Argument Diagrams.
    The word “philosophy” comes from the Greek “philos” (meaning love) and “sophia” (meaning wisdom); thus philosophy literally is the “love of wisdom.” Whatever else philosophy may be, most people agree that it still retains this spirit of its etymological roots, and that when we are engaged in philosophy we are pursuing wisdom for the sake of itself. Wisdom, however, is not the same thing as knowledge or information. We aren’t merely trying to amass list of interesting ideas, or believe anything (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Maralee Harrell (2012). Assessing the Efficacy of Argument Diagramming to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in Introduction to Philosophy. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (2):31-39.
    After determining one set of skills that we hoped our students were learning in the introductory philosophy class at Carnegie Mellon University, we performed an experiment twice over the course of two semesters to test whether they were actually learning these skills. In addition, there were four different lectures of this course in the first semester, and five in the second; in each semester students in some lectures were taught the material using argument diagrams as a tool to aid understanding (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Maralee Harrell (2011). Understanding, Evaluating, and Producing Arguments: Training is Necessary for Reasoning Skills. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (2):80-81.
    This commentary suggests that the general population has much less reasoning skill than is claimed by Mercier & Sperber (M&S). In particular, many studies suggest that the skills of understanding, evaluating, and producing arguments are generally poor in the population of people who have not had specific training.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Maralee Harrell, Argument Diagramming and Critical Thinking in Introductory Philosophy.
    In a multi-study naturalistic quasi-experiment involving 269 students in a semester-long introductory philosophy course, we investigated the effect of teaching argument diagramming (AD) on students’ scores on argument analysis tasks. An argument diagram is a visual representation of the content and structure of an argument. In each study, all of the students completed pre- and posttests containing argument analysis tasks. During the semester, the treatment group was taught AD, while the control group was not. The results were that among the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Maralee Harrell (2008). No Computer Program Required. Teaching Philosophy 31 (4):351-374.
    Argument-mapping software abounds, and one of the reasons is that using the software has been shown to teach/promote/improve critical-thinking skills. These positive results are very encouraging, but they also raise the question of whether the computer tutorial environment is producing these results, or whether learning argument mapping, even with just paper and pencil, is sufficient. Based on the results of two empirical studies, I argue that the basic skill of being able to represent an argument diagrammatically plays an important role (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Maralee Harrell (2005). Grading According to a Rubric. Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):3-15.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Maralee Harrell, Using Argument Diagrams to Improve Critical Thinking Skills in 80-100 What Philosophy Is.
    After determining one set of skills that we hoped our students were learning in the introductory philosophy class at Carnegie Mellon University, we designed an experiment, performed twice over the course of two semesters, to test whether they were actually learning these skills. In addition, there were four different lectures of this course in the Spring of 2004, and five in the Fall of 2004; and the students of Lecturer I (in both semesters) were taught the material using argument diagrams (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Maralee Harrell (2005). Using Argument Diagramming Software in the Classroom. Teaching Philosophy 28 (2):163-177.
  11. Maralee Harrell, The Improvement of Critical Thinking Skills in What Philosophy.
    Maralee Harrell. The Improvement of Critical Thinking Skills in What Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael Friedman, Robert DiSalle, J. D. Trout, Shaun Nichols, Maralee Harrell, Clark Glymour, Carl G. Wagner, Kent W. Staley, Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla & Frederick M. Kronz (2002). 10. Interpreting Quantum Field Theory Interpreting Quantum Field Theory (Pp. 348-378). Philosophy of Science 69 (2).
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Maralee Harrell & Clark Glymour (2002). Confirmation And Chaos. Philosophy of Science 69 (2):256-265.
    Recently, Rueger and Sharp (1996) and Koperski (1998) have been concerned to show that certain procedural accounts of model confirmation are compromised by non-linear dynamics. We suggest that the issues raised are better approached by considering whether chaotic data analysis methods allow for reliable inference from data. We provide a framework and an example of this approach.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation