7 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Marc A Cohen (Seattle University)
  1. Marc A. Cohen (2014). Empathy in Business Ethics Education Redux. Business Ethics Journal Review 2:1-7.
    My original paper (Cohen 2012) argued that business ethics education should focus on cultivating empathetic concern. This response clarifies terminology used in that paper and responds to criticisms presented by David Ohreen (2013).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marc A. Cohen (2014). Genuine, Non-Calculative Trust with Calculative Antecedents: Reconsidering Williamson on Trust. Journal of Trust Research 4 (1):44-56.
    This short paper defends Oliver Williamson’s (1993) claim that talk of trust is ‘redundant at best and can be misleading’ when trust is defined as a form of calculated risk (p. 463). And this paper accepts Williamson’s claim that ‘Calculative trust is a contradiction in terms’ (p. 463). But the present paper defends a conception of genuine, non-calculative trust that is compatible with calculative considerations and calculative antecedents. This conception of trust creates space for genuine (non-calculative) trust relationships in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Marc A. Cohen & John Dienhart (2013). Moral and Amoral Conceptions of Trust, with an Application in Organizational Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):1-13.
    Across the management, social science, and business ethics literatures, and in much of the philosophy literature, trust is characterized as a disposition to act given epistemic states—beliefs and/or expectations about others and about the risks involved. This characterization of trust is best thought of as epistemological because epistemic states distinguish trust from other dispositions. The epistemological characterization of trust is the amoral one referred to in the title of this paper, and we argue that this characterization is conceptually inadequate. We (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marc A. Cohen (2012). Empathy in Business Ethics Education. Journal of Business Ethics Education 9:359-375.
    This paper addresses the tactical question of how we ought to proceed in teachingbusiness ethics, taking as a starting point that business ethics should be concerned with cooperative,mutually beneficial outcomes, and in particular with fostering behavior that contributes to thoseoutcomes. This paper suggests that focus on moral reasoning as a tactical outcome—as a way ofachieving behavior in support of cooperative outcomes—is misplaced. Instead, we ought to focuson cultivating empathetic experiences. Intuitively, the problem we need to address in business ethicsis not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Marc A. Cohen (2010). The Narrow Application of Rawls in Business Ethics: A Political Conception of Both Stakeholder Theory and the Morality of Markets. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):563-579.
    This paper argues that Rawls’ principles of justice provide a normative foundation for stakeholder theory. The principles articulate (at an abstract level) citizens’ rights; these rights create interests across all aspects of society, including in the space of economic activity; and therefore, stakeholders – as citizens – have legitimate interests in the space of economic activity. This approach to stakeholder theory suggests a political interpretation of Boatright’s Moral Market approach, one that emphasizes the rights/place of citizens. And this approach to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Marc A. Cohen (2008). The Two-Stage Model of Emotion and the Interpretive Structure of the Mind. Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (4):291-320.
    Empirical evidence shows that non-conscious appraisal processes generate bodily responses to the environment. This finding is consistent with William James’s account of emotion, and it suggests that a general theory of emotion should follow James: a general theory should begin with the observation that physiological and behavioral responses precede our emotional experience. But I advance three arguments (empirical and conceptual arguments) showing that James’s further account of emotion as the experience of bodily responses is inadequate. I offer an alternative model, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Marc A. Cohen (2005). Against Basic Emotions, and Toward a Comprehensive Theory. Journal of Mind and Behavior 26 (4):229-254.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation