62 found
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  1. Marc Bekoff & Jessica Pierce (2009). Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals. University of Chicago Press.
    Scientists have long counseled against interpreting animal behavior in terms of human emotions, warning that such anthropomorphizing limits our ability to understand animals as they really are. Yet what are we to make of a female gorilla in a German zoo who spent days mourning the death of her baby? Or a wild female elephant who cared for a younger one after she was injured by a rambunctious teenage male? Or a rat who refused to push a lever for food (...)
     
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  2.  58
    Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1997). Species of Mind: The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology. MIT Press.
    The heart of this book is the reciprocal relationship between philosophical theories of mind and empirical studies of animal cognition.
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  3. Colin Allen, Marc Bekoff & George V. Lauder (eds.) (1998). Nature's Purposes: Analyses of Function and Design in Biology. The MIT Press.
  4.  40
    Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.) (2002). The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press.
    The fifty-seven original essays in this book provide a comprehensive overview of the interdisciplinary field of animal cognition.
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  5.  96
    Marc Bekoff (2004). Wild Justice and Fair Play: Cooperation, Forgiveness, and Morality in Animals. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):489-520.
    In this paper I argue that we can learn much about wild justice and the evolutionary origins of social morality – behaving fairly – by studying social play behavior in group-living animals, and that interdisciplinary cooperation will help immensely. In our efforts to learn more about the evolution of morality we need to broaden our comparative research to include animals other than non-human primates. If one is a good Darwinian, it is premature to claim that only humans can be empathic (...)
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  6.  65
    Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1995). Biological Function, Adaptation, and Natural Design. Philosophy of Science 62 (4):609-622.
    Recently something close to a consensus about the best way to naturalize the notion of biological function appears to be emerging. Nonetheless, teleological notions in biology remain controversial. In this paper we provide a naturalistic analysis for the notion of natural design. Many authors assume that natural design should be assimilated directly to function. Others find the notion problematic because it suggests that evolution is a directed process. We argue that both of these views are mistaken. Our naturalistic account does (...)
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  7. Marc Bekoff (2003). Considering Animals--Not Higher Primates. Zygon 38 (2):229-245.
  8. Marc Bekoff (2003). Consciousness and Self in Animals: Some Reflections. Zygon 38 (2):229-245.
    In this essay I argue that many nonhuman animal beings are conscious and have some sense of self. Rather than ask whether they are conscious, I adopt an evolutionary perspective and ask why consciousness and a sense of self evolved---what are they good for? Comparative studies of animal cognition, ethological investigations that explore what it is like to be a certain animal, are useful for answering this question. Charles Darwin argued that the differences in cognitive abilities and emotions among animals (...)
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  9. Marc Bekoff (2006). Animal Passions and Beastly Virtues: Cognitive Ethology as the Unifying Science for Understanding the Subjective, Emotional, Empathic, and Moral Lives of Animals. Zygon 41 (1):71-104.
  10. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2005). Animal Play and the Evolution of Morality: An Ethological Approach. Topoi 24 (2):125-135.
    In this paper we argue that there is much to learn about “wild justice” and the evolutionary origins of morality – behaving fairly – by studying social play behavior in group-living mammals. Because of its relatively wide distribution among the mammals, ethological investigation of play, informed by interdisciplinary cooperation, can provide a comparative perspective on the evolution of ethical behavior that is broader than is provided by the usual focus on primate sociality. Careful analysis of social play reveals rules of (...)
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  11.  58
    Colin Allen, Marc Bekoff, George Lauder, F. R. Ankersmit, Tom L. Beauchamp, Carsten Bengt-Pedersen & Niels Thomassen (1998). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Agamben, Diorgio, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, Heller-Roazen, Daniel (Transl.), Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 1998, Pp. 199,£ 30.00,£ 10.95. [REVIEW] Mind 107:428.
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  12. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2007). Animal Minds, Cognitive Ethology, and Ethics. Journal of Ethics 11 (3):299-317.
    Our goal in this paper is to provide enough of an account of the origins of cognitive ethology and the controversy surrounding it to help ethicists to gauge for themselves how to balance skepticism and credulity about animal minds when communicating with scientists. We believe that ethicists’ arguments would benefit from better understanding of the historical roots of ongoing controversies. It is not appropriate to treat some widely reported results in animal cognition as if their interpretations are a matter of (...)
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  13.  2
    Marc Bekoff (1988). Birdsong and the “Problem” of Nature and Nurture: Endless Chirping About Inadequate Evidence or Merely Singing the Blues About Inevitable Biases in, and Limitations of, Human Inference? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):631.
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  14. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether (...)
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  15.  9
    Marc Bekoff (1975). The Communication of Play Intention: Are Play Signals Functional? Semiotica 15 (3).
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  16.  21
    Marc Bekoff (2001). Social Play Behaviour. Cooperation, Fairness, Trust, and the Evolution of Morality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (2):81-90.
    Here I briefly discuss some comparative data on social play behaviour in hope of broadening the array of species in which researchers attempt to study animal morality. I am specifically concerned with the notion of ‘behaving fairly'. In the term ‘behaving fairly’ I use as a working guide the notion that animals often have social expectations when they engage in various sorts of social encounters the violation of which constitutes being treated unfairly because of a lapse in social etiquette. I (...)
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  17.  46
    Marc Bekoff & Dale W. Jamieson (eds.) (1996). Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press.
    This collection of 24 readings is the first comprehensive treatment of important topics by leading figures in the rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of...
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  18. Dale W. Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1992). Carruthers on Nonconscious Experience. Analysis 52 (1):23-28.
  19.  55
    Marc Bekoff (2007). Animals Matter: A Biologist Explains Why We Should Treat Animals with Compassion and Respect. Distributed in the United States by Random House.
    Bekoff urges us not only to understand and protect animals—especially those whose help we want for our research and other human needs—but to love and ...
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  20.  10
    Marc Bekoff & Colin Allen (1997). Cognitive Ethology: Slayers, Skeptics, and Proponents. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press 313--334.
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  21.  88
    Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1995). Cognitive Ethology and the Intentionality of Animal Behavior. Mind and Language 10 (4):313-328.
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  22.  80
    Marc Bekoff & Lofe Gruen (1993). Animal Welfare and Individual Characteristics: A Conversation Against Speciesism. Ethics and Behavior 3 (2):163 – 175.
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  23.  37
    Marc Bekoff (2001). The Evolution of Animal Play, Emotions, and Social Morality: On Science, Theology, Spirituality, Personhood, and Love. Zygon 36 (4):615-655.
  24.  47
    Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (1994). Intentionality, Social Play, and Definition. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):63-74.
    Social play is naturally characterized in intentional terms. An evolutionary account of social play could help scientists to understand the evolution of cognition and intentionality. Alexander Rosenberg (1990) has argued that if play is characterized intentionally or functionally, it is not a behavioral phenotype suitable for evolutionary explanation. If he is right, his arguments would threaten many projects in cognitive ethology. We argue that Rosenberg's arguments are unsound and that intentionally and functionally characterized phenotypes are a proper domain for ethological (...)
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  25.  18
    Marc Bekoff (2003). Minding Animals, Minding Earth: Old Brains, New Bottlenecks. Zygon 38 (4):911-941.
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  26.  31
    Marc Bekoff & Jan Nystrom (2004). The Other Side of Silence: Rachel Carson's Views of Animals. Zygon 39 (4):861-884.
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  27.  6
    Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1992). On Aims and Methods of Cognitive Ethology. Philosophy of Science Association 1992:110-124.
    In 1963 Niko Tinbergen published a paper, "On Aims and Methods of Ethology," dedicated to his friend Konrad Lorenz. Here Tinbergen defines ethology as "the biological study of behavior," and seeks to demonstrate "the close affinity between Ethology and the rest of Biology." Tinbergen identifies four major areas of ethology: causation, survival value, evolution, and ontogeny. Our goal is to attempt for cognitive ethology what Tinbergen succeeded in doing for ethology: to clarify its aims and methods, to distinguish some of (...)
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  28.  25
    Marc Bekoff (2001). Empathy: Common Sense, Science Sense, Wolves, and Well-Being. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):26-27.
    Empathy is likely more widely distributed among animals than many researchers realize or perhaps are willing to admit. Studies of social carnivores, other group-living animals, and communication via different modalities will help us learn more about the evolutionary roots and behavioral, sensory, and cognitive underpinnings of empathy, including what it means to have a sense of self. There are also important implications for debates about animal well-being.
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  29.  13
    Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1992). On Aims and Methods of Cognitive Ethology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:110-124.
    In 1963 Niko Tinbergen published a paper, "On Aims and Methods of Ethology," dedicated to his friend Konrad Lorenz. Here Tinbergen defines ethology as "the biological study of behavior," and seeks to demonstrate "the close affinity between Ethology and the rest of Biology." Tinbergen identifies four major areas of ethology: causation, survival value, evolution, and ontogeny. Our goal is to attempt for cognitive ethology what Tinbergen succeeded in doing for ethology: to clarify its aims and methods, to distinguish some of (...)
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  30.  38
    Marc Bekoff (1999). Social Cognition: Exchanging and Sharing Information on the Run. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 51 (1):617-632.
    In this essay I consider various aspects of the rapidly growing field of cognitive ethology, concentrating mainly on evolutionary and comparative discussion of the notion of intentionality. I am not concerned with consciousness, per se, for a concentration on consciousness deflects attention from other, and in many cases more interesting, problems in the study of animal cognition. I consider how, when, where, and (attempt to discuss) why individuals from different taxa exchange social information concerning their beliefs, desires, and goals. My (...)
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  31.  3
    Marc Bekoff (1992). Description and Explanation: A Plea for Plurality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):269-270.
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  32.  27
    Marc Bekoff (2006). The Public Lives of Animals: A Troubled Scientist, Pissy Baboons, Angry Elephants, and Happy Hounds. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (5):115-131.
  33.  26
    Marc Bekoff & Dale Jamieson (1991). Sport Hunting as an Instinct. Environmental Ethics 13 (4):375-378.
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  34.  4
    Fatima Agha Al-Hayani, Jacques Arnould, Ian G. Barbour, Marc Bekoff, Sjoerd L. Bonting, David Bradnick, Don Browning, John J. Carvalho Iv, Philip Clayton & Joseph K. Cosgrove (2008). Index to Volume 43. Zygon 43 (4).
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  35.  4
    Marc Bekoff (1982). Functional Aspects of Play as Revealed by Structural Components and Social Interaction Patterns. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):156.
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  36.  3
    Marc Bekoff (1991). The Animal's Point of View, Animal Welfare and Some Other Related Matters. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):753-755.
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  37.  8
    Marc Bekoff (forthcoming). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  38.  18
    Marc Bekoff (1994). But is It Research? What Price Interdisciplinary Interests? Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):249-252.
  39.  27
    Marc Bekoff (2008). Increasing Our Compassion Footprint: The Animals' Manifesto. Zygon 43 (4):771-781.
    Our relationships with animals are wide-ranging. When people tell me that they love animals and then harm or kill them I tell them I'm glad they don't love me. Many individuals, including scientists, ignore their responsibility when they interact with animals and fail to recognize that doing something in the name of science, which usually means in the name of humans, is not an adequate reason for intentionally causing suffering, pain, or death. "Good welfare" usually is not "good enough". Existing (...)
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  40.  3
    Marc Bekoff (1980). Human Ethology, Biological Determinism, Directive Genes, and Trees. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):623.
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  41.  6
    Marc Bekoff (2013). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):527-529.
  42. Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen, Gordon M. Burghardt, Ann B. Butler, Paul R. Manger & Peter Arhem (2008). ""Baker, Steve Picturing the Beast: Animals, Identity, and Representation. Urbana: University of Illinois. Barresi, J. And Moore, C." Intentional Relations and Social Understanding." Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19: 107-154. Bekoff, Marc Minding Animals: Awareness, Emotions. And Heart, New York: Oxford University. [REVIEW] In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge 143.
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  43.  21
    Marc Bekoff & Colin Allen (2000). Social Play is More Than a Pavlovian Romp. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):250-251.
    Some aspects of play may be explained by Pavlovian learning processes, but others are not so easily handled. Especially when there is a chance that specific actions can be misinterpreted; animals alter their behavior to reduce the likelihood that this will occur. The flexibility and fine-tuning of play make it an ideal candidate for comparative and evolutionary cognitive studies.
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  44. Joy A. Mench & Marc Bekoff (1998). Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. In Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press
     
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  45.  3
    Dale Jamieson & Marc Bekoff (1996). Afterward: Ethics and the Study of Animal Cognition. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press 359--71.
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  46.  4
    Marc Bekoff (2012). Review Vulture van Dooren Thom Reaktion Books London, England. Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (2):217-218.
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  47.  2
    Marc Bekoff, Kirsten Birkett, Paul R. Laurie M. Boehlke, Rachel L. Kolander, Sjoerd L. Bonting, Donald M. Braxton, John Hedley Brooke, Charlene P. E. Burns, John C. Caiazza & John J. Carvalho Iv (2006). Index to Volume 41. Zygon 41 (4).
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  48.  4
    Ghulam-Haider Aasi, John R. Albright, Marc Bekoff, Sjoerd L. Bonting, C. Mackenzie Brown, Don Browning, Frank E. Budenholzer, Michael Cavanaugh, Lawrence Cohen & Donald A. Crosby (2003). Index to Volume 38. Zygon 38 (4).
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  49.  4
    Colin Allen, Marc Bekoff, Ruth Amossy, Anne Herschberg Pierrot & Theo Bungarten (1999). Albright, Daniel, Quantum Poetics: Yeats, Pound, Eliot, and the Science of Modernism. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Allan, Sarah, The Way of Water and Sprouts of Virtue (= SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture). Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Semiotica 123 (3/4):397-400.
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  50. Marc Bekoff (1993). Common Sense, Cognitive Ethology and Evolution. In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin 102--108.
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