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  1. Marc D. Lewis & Zhong-xu Liu (2011). Three Time Scales of Neural Self-Organization Underlying Basic and Nonbasic Emotions. Emotion Review 3 (4):416-423.
    Our model integrates the nativist assumption of prespecified neural structures underpinning basic emotions with the constructionist view that emotions are assembled from psychological constituents. From a dynamic systems perspective, the nervous system self-organizes in different ways at different time scales, in relation to functions served by emotions. At the evolutionary scale, brain parts and their connections are specified by selective pressures. At the scale of development, connectivity is revised through synaptic shaping. At the scale of real time, temporary networks of (...)
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  2. James A. Russell, Erika L. Rosenberg & Marc D. Lewis (2011). Introduction to a Special Section on Basic Emotion Theory. Emotion Review 3 (4):363-363.
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  3. Marc D. Lewis (2005). An Emerging Dialogue Among Social Scientists and Neuroscientists on the Causal Bases of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):223-234.
    The target article developed a dynamic systems framework that viewed the causal basis of emotion as a self-organizing process giving rise to cognitive appraisal concurrently. Commentators on the article evaluated this framework and the principles and mechanisms it incorporated. They also suggested additional principles, mechanisms, modeling strategies, and phenomena related to emotion and appraisal, in place of or extending from those already proposed. There was general agreement that nonlinear causal processes are fundamental to the psychology and neurobiology of emotion.
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  4. Marc D. Lewis (2005). Bridging Emotion Theory and Neurobiology Through Dynamic Systems Modeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):169-194.
    Efforts to bridge emotion theory with neurobiology can be facilitated by dynamic systems (DS) modeling. DS principles stipulate higher-order wholes emerging from lower-order constituents through bidirectional causal processes cognition relations. I then present a psychological model based on this reconceptualization, identifying trigger, self-amplification, and self-stabilization phases of emotion-appraisal states, leading to consolidating traits. The article goes on to describe neural structures and functions involved in appraisal and emotion, as well as DS mechanisms of integration by which they interact. These mechanisms (...)
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  5. Marc D. Lewis & Rebecca M. Todd (2005). Getting Emotional - a Neural Perspective on Emotion, Intention, and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):210-235.
  6. Marc D. Lewis (2001). Self-Organizing Brains Don't Develop Gradually. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):47-47.
    Some dynamic systems approaches posit discontinuous changes, even universal stages, in development. Conversely, Thelen and colleagues see development as gradual because it relies on real-time interactions among many components. Yet their new model hinges on one parameter, neural cooperativity, that should change discontinuously because it engenders new skills that catalyze neural connectivity. In fact, research on cortical connectivity finds development to be discontinuous, and possibly stage-like, based on experience-dependent and experience-independent factors.
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  7. Jason T. Ramsay & Marc D. Lewis (2000). The Causal Status of Emotions in Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):215-216.
    Rolls demonstrates how reward/punishment systems are key mediators of cognitive appraisal, and this suggests a fundamental, causal role for emotion in thought and behaviour. However, this causal role for emotion seems to drop out of Rolls's model of consciousness, to be replaced by the old idea that emotion is essentially epiphenomenal. We suggest a modification to Rolls's model in which cognition and emotion activate each other reciprocally, both in appraisal and consciousness, thus allowing emotion to maintain its causal status where (...)
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  8. Marc D. Lewis & Isabela Granic (1999). Self‐Organization of Cognition‐Emotion Interactions. In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley. 683--701.
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  9. Marc D. Lewis (1997). Personality Self-Organization: Cascading Constraints on Cognition-Emotion Interaction. In Alan Fogel, Maria C. D. P. Lyra & Jaan Valsiner (eds.), Dynamics and Indeterminism in Developmental and Social Processes. L. Erlbaum. 294--193.
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  10. Marc D. Lewis (1996). Self-Organising Cognitive Appraisals. Cognition and Emotion 10 (1):1-26.
  11. Marc D. Lewis (1993). Emotion-Cognition Interactions in Early Infant Development. Cognition and Emotion 7 (2):145-170.