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  1. Steven Miller & Marcel Fredericks (2002). Reliabilism 'Naturalized'. Social Epistemology 16 (4):367 – 376.
    The article is an attempt to better understand the objections to the doctrine of 'reliabilism' made by prominent epistemologists. The view argued for here is that while one extreme case of anti-reliabilism seems to be the paradigm case against the entire concept, this very case points out some additional, and implicit, problems with the standard account of epistemic justification. The most notable is that the standard view attacks reliabilism on the grounds that it lacks a means of giving adequate reasons (...)
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  2. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1997). Another View of Translation Manuals and the Study of Science. Synthese 113 (2):171-193.
    The article argues for the possibility of translation manuals having an implicit internal structure. This structure is composed of specific methodological assumptions and techniques. Using the (N)-type and (G)-type distinction developed by Fuller for the study of scientific behavior, it is shown that these are incomplete characterizations of translation manuals. A more complete characterization must involve an analysis of how the presence or absence of methodological rules influences the interpretation of specific research questions. It is further argued that while Quine's (...)
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  3. Susan I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1996). Can There Be" Rules" for Qualitative Inquiry. Journal of Thought 31:61-72.
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  4. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1991). A Case for "Qualitative Confirmation" for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):452-467.
    This paper attempts to clarify the meaning and significance of "qualitative confirmation". The need to do so is related to the fact that, without such a conceptualization, a large portion of the human sciences are relegated to a less than scientific status. Accordingly, "qualitative confirmation" is viewed as a proper subset of traditional confirmation theory. To establish such a case, a general Hempelian framework is utilized, but it is supplemented with two additional levels of confirmation. It is concluded that the (...)
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  5. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1991). Some Notes on the Nature of Methodological Indeterminacy. Synthese 88 (3):359 - 378.
    This paper is an attempt to extend the meaning of the concept of indeterminacy for the human sciences. The authors do this by coining the term methodological indeterminacy and arguing that indeterminacy is better understood when linked to specific methodological techniques. Paradoxically, while specific research techniques demonstrate that the issue of indeterminacy is complex, yielding the possibility of types and degrees, it does not eliminate the problem of translation first raised by Quine. However, the authors go on to argue that, (...)
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  6. Steven J. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1989). Some Comments on the Projectibility of Anthropological Hypotheses: Samoa Briefly Revisited. Erkenntnis 30 (3):279 - 299.
    The purpose of this article is to examine the applicability of the theory of projection for Anthropological hypotheses. The claim is made that Goodman's classic statement of the problem does not apply in its entirety to actual Anthropological hypotheses. The recent Freeman-Mead debate is employed as a framework for the discussion, illustrating that the issue of projectibility, while central for the social sciences, is best used as a backdrop to illustrate several important methodological problems. For Anthropology, and other related social (...)
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  7. Marcel Fredericks & Steven Miller (1988). Some Notes on Confirming Hypotheses in Qualitative Research: An Application. Social Epistemology 2 (4):345 – 352.
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