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  1. Andrew Crane, Dirk Ulrich Gilbert, Kenneth E. Goodpaster, Marcia P. Miceli & Geoff Moore (2011). Comments on BEQ's Twentieth Anniversary Forum on New Directions for Business Ethics Research. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):157-187.
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  2. Marcia P. Miceli, Janet P. Near & Terry Morehead Dworkin (2009). A Word to the Wise: How Managers and Policy-Makers Can Encourage Employees to Report Wrongdoing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (3):379 - 396.
    When successful and ethical managers are alerted to possible organizational wrongdoing, they take corrective action before the problems become crises. However, recent research [e. g., Rynes et al. (2007, Academy of Management Journal 50(5), 987-1008)] indi cates that many organizations fail to implement evidence-based practices (i. e., practices that are consistent with research findings), in many aspects of human resource management. In this paper, we draw from years of research on whistle-blowing by social scientists and legal scholars and offer concrete (...)
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  3. Marcia P. Miceli (2004). Does Type of Wrongdoing Affect the Whistle-Blowing Process? Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):219-242.
    We analyzed data from a survey of employees of a large military base in order to assess possible differences in the whistle-blowingprocess due to type of wrongdoing observed. Employees who observed perceived wrongdoing involving mismanagement, sexual harassment, or unspecified legal violations were significantly more likely to report it than were employees who observed stealing, waste, safety problems, or discrimination. Further, type of wrongdoing was significantly related to reasons given by employees who observed wrongdoing but did not report it, across all (...)
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  4. Marcia P. Miceli, John Blackburn & Stephen Mangum (1988). Employers' Pay Practices and Potential Responses to “Comparable Worth” Litigation an Identification of Research Issues. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (5):347 - 358.
    Comparable worth is a controversial compensation strategy. In this paper, research issues that arise when employers perform point-based job evaluations, but deviate from them because of market factors, are discussed. Greater research attention to the actual operation of markets and to the consequences of conflicts in equity perceptions is encouraged.
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  5. David B. Greenberger, Marcia P. Miceli & Debra J. Cohen (1987). Oppositionists and Group Norms: The Reciprocal Influence of Whistle-Blowers and Co-Workers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (7):527 - 542.
    Who blows the whistle — a loner or a well-liked team player? Which of them is more likely to lead a successful opposition to perceived organizational wrongdoing? The potential influence of co-worker pressures to conform on whistle-blowing activity or the likely effects of whistle-blowing on the group have not been addressed. This paper presents a preliminary model of whistle-blowing as an act of nonconformity. One implication is that the success of an opposition will depend on the characteristics of the whistle-blower (...)
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  6. Janet P. Near & Marcia P. Miceli (1985). Organizational Dissidence: The Case of Whistle-Blowing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):1 - 16.
    Research on whistle-blowing has been hampered by a lack of a sound theoretical base. In this paper, we draw upon existing theories of motivation and power relationships to propose a model of the whistle-blowing process. This model focuses on decisions made by organization members who believe they have evidence of organizational wrongdoing, and the reactions of organization authorities. Based on a review of the sparse empirical literature, we suggest variables that may affect both the members' decisions and the organization's responses.
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