Search results for 'Marcus Lefébure' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ruth Barcan Marcus, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Diana Raffman & Nicholas Asher (eds.) (1995). Modality, Morality, and Belief: Essays in Honor of Ruth Barcan Marcus. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    Modality, morality and belief are among the most controversial topics in philosophy today, and few philosophers have shaped these debates as deeply as Ruth Barcan Marcus. Inspired by her work, a distinguished group of philosophers explore these issues, refine and sharpen arguments and develop new positions on such topics as possible worlds, moral dilemmas, essentialism, and the explanation of actions by beliefs. This 'state of the art' collection honours one of the most rigorous and iconoclastic of philosophical pioneers.
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  2. Ruth B. Marcus (1962). On the Paper of Ruth B. Marcus. Synthese 14 (2/3):132 - 143.score: 120.0
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  3. Gregory Baum, John Aloysius Coleman & Marcus Lefébure (eds.) (1984). The Sexual Revolution. T. & T. Clark.score: 120.0
  4. Steven Kepnes, David Tracy & Marcus Lefébure (eds.) (1982). The Challenge of Psychology to Faith. Seabury Press.score: 120.0
     
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  5. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1980). Moral Dilemmas and Consistency. Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):121-136.score: 60.0
    Marcus argues that moral dilemmas are real, but that they are not the result of inconsistent moral principles. Moral principles are consistent just in case there is some world where all principles are 'obeyable.' They are inconsistent just in case there is no world where all are 'obeyable.' What this logical point is meant to show is that moral dilemmas do not make moral codes inconsistent. She also discusses guilt, and argues that guilt is still appropriate even in cases (...)
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  6. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1961/1993). Modalities: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Based on her earlier ground-breaking axiomatization of quantified modal logic, the papers collected here by the distinguished philosopher Ruth Barcan Marcus cover much ground in the development of her thought, spanning from 1961 to 1990. The first essay here introduces themes initially viewed as iconoclastic, such as the necessity of identity, the directly referential role of proper names as "tags", the Barcan Formula about the interplay of possibility and existence, and alternative interpretations of quantification. Marcus also addresses the (...)
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  7. Alan Ross Anderson, Ruth Barcan Marcus, R. M. Martin & Frederic B. Fitch (eds.) (1975). The Logical Enterprise. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    Metaphysics and language: Quine, W. V. O. On the individuation of attributes. Körner, S. On some relations between logic and metaphysics. Marcus, R. B. Does the principle of substitutivity rest on a mistake? Van Fraassen, B. C. Platonism's pyrrhic victory. Martin, R. M. On some prepositional relations. Kearns, J. T. Sentences and propositions.--Basic and combinatorial logic: Orgass, R. J. Extended basic logic and ordinal numbers. Curry, H. B. Representation of Markov algorithms by combinators.--Implication and consistency: Anderson, A. R. Fitch (...)
     
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  8. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1998). Quentin Smith. In J. H. Fetzer & P. Humphreys (eds.), The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus, and its Origins. Kluwer. 3.score: 60.0
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  9. Mordecai Marcus (1960). What is an Initiation Story? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (2):221-228.score: 30.0
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  10. Eric Marcus (2004). Why Zombies Are Inconceivable. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):477-90.score: 30.0
    I argue that zombies are inconceivable. More precisely, I argue that the conceivability-intuition that is used to demonstrate their possibility has been misconstrued. Thought experiments alleged to feature zombies founder on the fact that, on the one hand, they _must_ involve first-person imagining, and yet, on the other hand, _cannot_. Philosophers who take themselves to have imagined zombies have unwittingly conflated imagining a creature who lacks consciousness with imagining a creature without also imagining the consciousness it may or may not (...)
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  11. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1961). Modalities and Intensional Languages. Synthese 13 (4):303-322.score: 30.0
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  12. Eric Marcus (2005). Mental Causation in a Physical World. Philosophical Studies 122 (1):27-50.score: 30.0
    Abstract: It is generally accepted that the most serious threat to the possibility of mental causation is posed by the causal self-sufficiency of physical causal processes. I argue, however, that this feature of the world, which I articulate in principle I call Completeness, in fact poses no genuine threat to mental causation. Some find Completeness threatening to mental causation because they confuse it with a stronger principle, which I call Closure. Others do not simply conflate Completeness and Closure, but (...)
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  13. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1972). Quantification and Ontology. Noûs 6 (3):240-250.score: 30.0
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  14. Eric Marcus (2006). Intentionalism and the Imaginability of the Inverted Spectrum. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):321-339.score: 30.0
    There has been much written in recent years about whether a pair of subjects could have visual experiences that represented the colors of objects in their environment in precisely the same way, despite differing significantly in what it was like to undergo them, differing that is, in their qualitative character. The possibility of spectrum inversion has been so much debated1 in large part because of the threat that it would pose to the more general doctrine of Intentionalism, according to which (...)
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  15. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1981). A Proposed Solution to a Puzzle About Belief. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 6 (1):501-510.score: 30.0
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  16. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1962). Interpreting Quantification. Inquiry 5 (1-4):252 – 259.score: 30.0
    Alternative readings of quantification are considered. The absence of an unequivocal translation into ordinary speech is noted. Some examples are cited which, in the opinion of the author, are a result of equivocal readings of quantification, or unnecessarily restrictive readings which obscure its primary function.
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  17. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1983). Rationality and Believing the Impossible. Journal of Philosophy 80 (6):321-338.score: 30.0
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  18. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1967). Essentialism in Modal Logic. Noûs 1 (1):91-96.score: 30.0
  19. Eric Marcus (2010). Life and Action. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):749-751.score: 30.0
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  20. Eric Marcus (2009). Why There Are No Token States. Journal of Philosophical Research 34:215-241.score: 30.0
    The thesis that mental states are physical states enjoys widespread popularity. After the abandonment of typeidentity theories, however, this thesis has typically been framed in terms of state tokens. I argue that token states are a philosopher’s fiction, and that debates about the identity of mental and physical state tokens thus rest on a mistake.
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  21. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1960). Extensionality. Mind 69 (273):55-62.score: 30.0
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  22. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1971). Essential Attribution. Journal of Philosophy 68 (7):187-202.score: 30.0
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  23. Rutharcan B. Marcus (1990). Some Revisionary Proposals About Belief and Believing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:133-153.score: 30.0
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  24. Eric Marcus (2001). Mental Causation: Unnaturalized but Not Unnatural. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):57-83.score: 30.0
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  25. Eric Marcus (2006). Events, Sortals, and the Mind-Body Problem. Synthese 150 (1):99-129.score: 30.0
    In recent decades, a view of identity I call Sortalism has gained popularity. According to this view, if a is identical to b, then there is some sortal S such that a is the same S as b. Sortalism has typically been discussed with respect to the identity of objects. I argue that the motivations for Sortalism about object-identity apply equally well to event-identity. But Sortalism about event-identity poses a serious threat to the view that mental events are token identical (...)
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  26. Gary F. Marcus (2005). What Developmental Biology Can Tell Us About Innateness. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 23.score: 30.0
  27. Gary F. Marcus (2002). What Can Developmental Disorders Tell Us About Modularity? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):762-763.score: 30.0
    This commentary discusses the logic of inferring modularity or the lack of modularity from observed patterns of developmental disorders.
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  28. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1953). Strict Implication, Deducibility and the Deduction Theorem. Journal of Symbolic Logic 18 (3):234-236.score: 30.0
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  29. Paul Marcus (2003). Ancient Religious Wisdom, Spirituality, and Psychoanalysis. Praeger.score: 30.0
    Unlike most books on psychoanalysis and religion, where psychoanalysis is regarded as a superior mode of understanding, this work explains how psychoanalysis ...
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  30. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1966). Iterated Deontic Modalities. Mind 75 (300):580-582.score: 30.0
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  31. Russell Marcus (2013). Intrinsic Explanation and Field's Dispensabilist Strategy. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (2):163 - 183.score: 30.0
    Philosophy of mathematics for the last half-century has been dominated in one way or another by Quine’s indispensability argument. The argument alleges that our best scientific theory quantifies over, and thus commits us to, mathematical objects. In this paper, I present new considerations which undermine the most serious challenge to Quine’s argument, Hartry Field’s reformulation of Newtonian Gravitational Theory.
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  32. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1974). Classes, Collections, and Individuals. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (3):227 - 232.score: 30.0
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  33. Gary F. Marcus & Frank C. Keil (2008). Concepts, Correlations, and Some Challenges for Connectionist Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):722-723.score: 30.0
    Rogers & McClelland's (R&M's) précis represents an important effort to address key issues in concepts and categorization, but few of the simulations deliver what is promised. We argue that the models are seriously underconstrained, importantly incomplete, and psychologically implausible; more broadly, R&M dwell too heavily on the apparent successes without comparable concern for limitations already noted in the literature.
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  34. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1950). The Elimination of Contextually Defined Predicates in a Modal System. Journal of Symbolic Logic 15 (2):92.score: 30.0
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  35. ed Marcus, George E. & Fred Red Myers (1996). Book Review: The Traffic in Culture: Refiguring Art and Anthropology. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 20 (1).score: 30.0
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  36. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1991). Errata: Some Revisionary Proposals About Belief and Believing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3).score: 30.0
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  37. Gary Marcus (2005). Opposites Detract: Why Rules and Similarity Should Not Be Viewed as Opposite Ends of a Continuum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):28-29.score: 30.0
    Criteria that aim to dichotomize cognition into rules and similarity are destined to fail because rules and similarity are not in genuine conflict. It is possible for a given cognitive domain to exploit rules without similarity, similarity without rules, or both (rules and similarity) at the same time.
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  38. Gary F. Marcus (2004). Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates the Complexity of Human Thought. Basic Books.score: 30.0
  39. Russell Marcus (2007). Structuralism, Indispensability, and the Access Problem. Facta Philosophica 9 (1):203-211.score: 30.0
    The access problem for mathematics arises from the supposition that the referents of mathematical terms inhabit a realm separate from us. Quine’s approach in the philosophy of mathematics dissolves the access problem, though his solution sometimes goes unrecognized, even by those who rely on his framework. This paper highlights both Quine’s position and its neglect. I argue that Michael Resnik’s structuralist, for example, has no access problem for the so-called mathematical objects he posits, despite recent criticism, since he relies on (...)
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  40. Frederick R. Marcus (2009). Vico's New Science From the Standpoint of the Hebrews. New Vico Studies 27:1-26.score: 30.0
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  41. Nancy du Bois Marcus (1998). The Kinship of Vico and Plato. New Vico Studies 16:86-88.score: 30.0
  42. Eric Marcus (2001). Mental Causation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):57 - 83.score: 30.0
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  43. Margaret Marcus (1947). The Romantic Garden in Persia. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 5 (3):181-183.score: 30.0
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  44. Frederick R. Marcus (1995). Vico and the Hebrews. New Vico Studies 13:14-32.score: 30.0
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  45. Eric Marcus, Defending Naïve Realism About Mental Properties.score: 30.0
    _metaphysically transparent_: we do not arrive at a better understanding of the realm of facts that make such talk true or false when we abandon ordinary mental concepts in favor of naturalistic concepts—or, for that matter, in favor of supernaturalistic concepts, although _super_naturalism will not be my concern here. Rather, it is ordinary mental concepts themselves that provide the best framework for understanding the metaphysics of mind. In this essay, I will be concerned just with naïve realism about mental _properties_. (...)
     
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  46. Gary F. Marcus (1997). Extracting Higher-Level Relationships in Connectionist Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):77-77.score: 30.0
    Connectionist networks excel at extracting statistical regularities but have trouble extracting higher-order relationships. Clark & Thornton suggest that a solution to this problem might come from Elman (1993), but I argue that the success of Elman's single recurrent network is illusory, and show that it cannot in fact represent abstract relationships that can be generalized to novel instances, undermining Clark & Thornton's key arguments.
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  47. Ruth Barcan Marcus, Georg Dorn & Paul Weingartner (eds.) (1986). Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Vii: Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress of Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Salzburg, 1983. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science VII.
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  48. Margaret F. Marcus (1952). Some Oriental Ways with Flowers. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 11 (2):160-170.score: 30.0
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  49. Ralph Marcus (1945). Book Review:Early Pythagorean Politics in Practice and Theory. Edwin L. Minar, Jr. [REVIEW] Ethics 55 (3):232-.score: 30.0
  50. Zoltán Tar & Judith Marcus (1986). Recent Lukács Scholarship in Eastern Europe: A Trend Report From Hungary. Studies in East European Thought 31 (1):27-37.score: 30.0
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