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Profile: Margaret A. "Peg" Simons (Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville)
  1. Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.) (2012). Political Writings. University of Illinois Press.
    New translations tracing decades of Beauvoir's leftist political engagement during the turbulent era of decolonization, from articles exposing conditions in fascist Spain and Portugal in 1945 and hard hitting attacks on right-wing intellectuals in the 1950s, to a 1962 defense of an Algerian freedom fighter, Djamila Boupacha, and a 1975 article calling for the 'two state solution' in Israel. The texts range from a surprising 1952 defense of the misogynistic 18th c. pornographer, the Marquis de Sade, to the transcription of (...)
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  2. Margaret A. Simons (2012). A Question ofInfluence. In Shannon M. Mussett & William S. Wilkerson (eds.), Beauvoir and Western Thought From Plato to Butler. 153.
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  3. Margaret A. Simons (2012). Beauvoir and Bergson: A Question of Influence. In Shannon M. Mussett & William S. Wilkerson (eds.), Beauvoir and Western Thought from Plato to Butler. 153-170.
    Simone de Beauvoir’s early enthusiasm for the philosophy of Henri Bergson (1859-1941)—denied in her 1958 autobiography, Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter—is a surprising discovery in her 1927 handwritten student diary, as I reported in 1999 and explored at more length in 2003 (Simons 1999; Simons 2003). Discovered by Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir after Beauvoir’s death in 1986 and now housed in the Bibliothèque nationale, Beauvoir’s student diary first appeared in print in the 2006 volume, Diary of a Philosophy Student: (...)
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  4. Margaret A. Simons (2012). Existentialism: A Beauvoirean Lineage. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):261-267.
    The posthumously published diaries and letters of Beauvoir and Sartre challenge the traditional account of Beauvoir as Sartre's philosophical follower. They show Sartre drawing on Beauvoir's account of relations with the Other in her metaphysical novel, She Came to Stay, as he began writing Being and Nothingness, and point to an unexplored Beauvoirean lineage of existentialism, including Bergson as well as Hegel, Kierkegaard, Husserl and Heidegger, and the African-American writer, Richard Wright.
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  5. Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.) (2011). The Useless Mouths and Other Literary Writings. University of Illinois Press.
    The Useless Mouths" and Other Literary Writings brings to English-language readers literary writings--several previously unknown--by Simone de Beauvoir. Culled from sources including various American university collections, the works span decades of Beauvoir's career. Ranging from dramatic works and literary theory to radio broadcasts, they collectively reveal fresh insights into Beauvoir's writing process, personal life, and the honing of her philosophy. The volume begins with a new translation of the 1945 play The Useless Mouths, written in Paris during the Nazi occupation. (...)
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  6. Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons, Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir & Anne Deing Cordero (eds.) (2009). Wartime Diary. University of Illinois Press.
    Written from September 1939 to January 1941, Simone de Beauvoir’s Wartime Diary gives English readers unabridged access to one of the scandalous texts that threaten to overturn traditional views of Beauvoir’s life and work. The account in Beauvoir’s Wartime Diary of her clandestine affair with Jacques Bost and sexual relationships with various young women challenges the conventional picture of Beauvoir as the devoted companion of Jean-Paul Sartre, just as her account of completing her novel She Came to Stay at a (...)
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  7. Edward Fullbrook & Margaret A. Simons (2009). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  8. Edward Fullbrook & Margaret A. Simons (2009). Commentary. Beauvoir and Sartre: The Problem of the Other; Corrected Notes. In An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy. 509-523.
    Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre struggled for the whole of their philosophical careers against one of modern Western philosophy's most pervasive concepts, the Cartesian notion of self. A notion of self is always a complex of ideas; in the case of Beauvoir and Sartre it includes the ideas of embodiment, temporality, the Other, and intersubjectivity. This essay will show the considerable part that gender, especially Beauvoir's position as a woman in twentieth-century France, played in the development, presentation and reception (...)
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  9. Margaret A. Simons (2009). Introduction. In Margaret A. Simons & Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir (eds.), Wartime Diary. University of Illinois Press. 1-35.
    Simone de Beauvoir’s readers who saw a heterosexual ideal in her relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre must have been dismayed by the 1990 French publication of her Journal de guerre (Wartime Diary) and Lettres à Sartre (Letters to Sartre). Discovered after Beauvoir’s death in 1986 and edited for publication by her adopted daughter, Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir, Beauvoir’s Wartime Diary and Letters to Sartre recount her sexual affairs with several young women. In Deirdre Bair’s authorized biography of Beauvoir, also published (...)
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  10. Simone de Beauvoir, Barbara Klaw & Margaret A. Simons (eds.) (2006). Diary of a Philosophy Student, Volume 1: 1926-27. University of Illinois Press.
    Revelatory insights into the early life and thought of the preeminent French feminist philosopher Dating from her years as a philosophy student at the Sorbonne, this is the 1926-27 diary of the teenager who would become the famous French philosopher, author, and feminist, Simone de Beauvoir. Written years before her first meeting with Jean-Paul Sartre, these diaries reveal previously unknown details about her life and offer critical insights into her early philosophy and literary works. Presented here for the first time (...)
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  11. Simone de Beauvoir, Barbara Klaw, Margaret A. Simons & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.) (2006). Diary of a Philosophy Student, Volume 1: 1926-27. University of Illinois Press.
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  12. Margaret A. Simons (2006). Beauvoir's Early Philosophy: 1926-27. In Simone de Beauvoir, Barbara Klaw, Margaret A. Simons & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.), Diary of a Philosophy Student, Volume 1: 1926-27. University of Illinois Press. 29-50.
    For philosophers familiar with the traditional interpretation of Simone de Beauvoir as a literary writer and philosophical follower of Jean-Paul Sartre, Beauvoir’s 1926-27 student diary is a revelation. Inviting an exploration of Beauvoir’s early philosophy foreclosed by the traditional interpretation, the student diary reveals Beauvoir’s early dedication to becoming a philosopher and her early formulation of philosophical problems and positions usually attributed to Sartre’s influence, such as the central problem of “the opposition of self and other,” years before she first (...)
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  13. Margaret A. Simons (ed.) (2006). The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Critical Essays. Indiana University Press.
    Since her death in 1986 and the publication of her letters and diaries in 1990, interest in the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir has increased.
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  14. Margaret A. Simons (2005). Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction (Review). Hypatia 14 (4):183-186.
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  15. Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons, Mary Beth Mader & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.) (2004). Simone de Beauvoir: Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press.
    Contents: "Analysis of Claude Bernard's Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine," "Two Unpublished Chapters from She Came to Stay," "Pyrrhus and Cineas," "A Review of The Phenomenology of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty," "Moral Idealism and Political Realism," "Existentialism and Popular Wisdom," "Jean-Paul Sartre," "An Eye for an Eye," "Literature and Metaphysics," "Introduction to an Ethics of Ambiguity," "An Existentialist Looks at Americans," and "What is Existentialism?".
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  16. Margaret A. Simons & Helene N. Peters (2004). Introduction to Beauvoir's "Analysis of Claude Bernard's Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine&Quot;. In Margaret A. Simons, Marybeth Timmermann & Mary Beth Mader (eds.), Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press. 15-22.
    In December 1924 when Simone de Beauvoir almost certainly wrote her essay analyzing Claude Bernard's "Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine," a classic text in the philosophy of science, she was a 16 yr old student in a senior-level philosophy class at a private Catholic girls' school. Given the popular conception of existentialism as anti science, Beauvoir's early interest in science, reflected in her baccalaureate successes as well as her paper on Bernard, may be surprising. But her enthusiasm for (...)
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  17. Margaret A. Simons, Marybeth Timmermann & Mary Beth Mader (eds.) (2004). Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press.
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  18. Margaret A. Simons (2003). Bergson's Influence on Beauvoir's Philosophical Methodology. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. 107-128.
    The topic of this chapter, the early philosophical influence of Henri Bergson (1859-1941) on Simone de Beauvoir, may surprise those who remember Beauvoir’s reference to Bergson in her Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter where she denies Bergson’s importance. She writes there of her interests in 1926: “I preferred literature to philosophy, and I would not have been at all pleased if someone had prophesized that I would become a kind of Bergson; I didn’t want to speak with that abstract voice (...)
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  19. Walter A. Brogan & Margaret A. Simons (2001). Editors' Introduction. Philosophy Today 45 (9999):3-8.
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  20. Margaret A. Simons (2000). Beauvoir's Philosophical Independence in a Dialogue with Sartre. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (2):87-103.
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  21. Margaret A. Simons (1999). Book Review: Edward Fullbrook and Kate Fullbrook. Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction. New York: Polity Press/Blackwell, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (4):183-186.
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  22. Margaret A. Simons (1999). Beauvoir and The Second Sex: Feminism, Race, and the Origins of Existentialism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    In a compelling chronicle of her search to understand Beauvoir's philosophy in The Second Sex, Margaret A. Simons offers a unique perspective on Beauvoir's wide-ranging contribution to twentieth-century thought. She details the discovery of the origins of Beauvoir's existential philosophy in her handwritten diary from 1927; uncovers evidence of the sexist exclusion of Beauvoir from the philosophical canon; reveals evidence that the African-American writer Richard Wright provided Beauvoir with the theoretical model of oppression that she used in The Second Sex; (...)
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  23. Margaret A. Simons (1999). From Murder to Morality. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):1-20.
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  24. Margaret A. Simons (1999). Preface. Hypatia 14 (4):1-2.
  25. Margaret A. Simons (1998). An Appeal to Reopen the Question of Influence. Philosophy Today 42 (9999):17-24.
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  26. Azizah Y. Al-Hibri & Margaret A. Simons (eds.) (1990). Hypatia Reborn: Essays in Feminist Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
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  27. Margaret A. Simons (1990). Sexism and the Philosophical Canon: On Reading Beauvoir's «The Second Sex». Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (3):487-504.
     
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  28. Simone De Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons & Jane Marie Todd (1989). Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir. Hypatia 3 (3):11 - 27.
    In these interviews from 1982 and 1985, I ask Beauvoir about her philosophical differences with Jean-Paul Sartre on the issues of voluntarism vs social conditioning and embodiment, individualism vs reciprocity, and ontology vs ethics. We also discuss her influence on Sartre's work, the problems with the current English translation of The Second Sex, her analyses of motherhood and feminist concepts of woman-identity, and her own experience of sexism.
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