Search results for 'Margaret Anne Cleek' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret Anne Cleek & Sherry Lynn Leonard (1998). Can Corporate Codes of Ethics Influence Behavior? Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):619 - 630.score: 290.0
    There is increasing public interest in understanding the nature of corporate ethics due to the knowledge that unethical decisions and activities frequently undermine the performance and abilities of many organizations. Of the current literature found on the topic of ways organizations can influence ethical behavior, a majority is found on the issue of corporate codes of ethics.Most discussions on codes of ethics evaluate the contents of the codes and offer opinions on their wording, content, and/or value. Unfortunately, very little research (...)
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  2. Sean McAleer (2011). Baxley , Anne Margaret . Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy . New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Xvi+189. $85.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (1):174-178.score: 36.0
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  3. Reidar Maliks (2013). Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy. By Anne Margaret Baxley. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. Xvi + 189. Price £61.00 Hb.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):616-618.score: 36.0
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  4. Anne Margaret Baxley (2010). Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Anne Margaret Baxley offers a systematic interpretation of Kant's theory of virtue, whose most distinctive features have not been properly understood. She explores the rich moral psychology in Kant's later and less widely read works on ethics, and argues that the key to understanding his account of virtue is the concept of autocracy, a form of moral self-government in which reason rules over sensibility. Although certain aspects of Kant's theory bear comparison to more familiar Aristotelian claims about virtue, (...)
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  5. Thomas H. Bestul (1994). Margaret Ann Palliser, OP, Christ, Our Mother of Mercy: Divine Mercy and Compassion in the Theology of the “Shewings” of Julian of Norwich. Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1992. Pp. Xiv, 262. DM 168. [REVIEW] Speculum 69 (3):869-871.score: 20.0
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  6. Graeme Smith (2007). Margaret Thatcher's Christian Faith: A Case Study in Political Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):233 - 257.score: 18.0
    Throughout the 1980s Margaret Thatcher dominated British and global politics. At the same time she maintained an active Christian faith, which she understood as shaping and informing her political choices and policies. In this article I argue that we can construct from Thatcher's key speeches, her memoirs, and her book on public policy a cultural "theo-political" identity which guided her political decisions. Thatcher's identity was as an Anglo-Saxon Nonconformist. This consisted of her belief in values such as thrift and (...)
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  7. Kerry Manders (2012). Stay the Night: Meera Margaret Singh at the Gladstone Hotel. Mediatropes 3 (2):109-132.score: 18.0
    This essay examines Meera Margaret Singh’s exhibition Nightingale in the time and place of the liminal space we call “hotel.” In intertexual dialogue with Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, the author not only reviews Singh’s intimate photographs of her mother, she reads the images with and against the architecture in which they are exhibited. The Gladstone as exhibition space redoubles Singh’s emphasis on the tense connectivity of apparent binaries: youth and age, public and private, artist and model, object and spectator, (...)
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  8. Christia Mercer (2012). Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Leibniz and Anne Conway. In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. 179.score: 15.0
  9. Thomas Sturm (2001). Margaret S. Archer, Being Human: The Problem of Agency. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 5 (46).score: 15.0
    A review which, among other criticisms of Archer's book, discusses some philosophical problems concerning talk of the "self" in the human sciences.
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  10. Theo A. F. Kuipers (2005). Verstehen, Einfhlen and Mental Simulation: Reply to Anne Rugh Mackor. In Cognitive Structures in Scientific Inquiry: Essays in Debate with Theo Kuipers. New York: Rodopi NY. 263-267.score: 15.0
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  11. Margaret Anne Pierce & John W. Henry (1996). Computer Ethics: The Role of Personal, Informal, and Formal Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (4):425 - 437.score: 14.0
    Ethical decisions related to computer technology and computer use are subject to three primary influences: (1) the individual's own personal code (2) any informal code of ethical behavior that exists in the work place, and (3) exposure to formal codes of ethics. The relative importance of these codes, as well as factors influencing these codes, was explored in a nationwide survey of information system (IS) professionals. The implications of the findings are important to educators and employers in the development of (...)
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  12. Margaret Anne Pierce & John W. Henry (2000). Judgements About Computer Ethics: Do Individual, Co-Worker, and Company Judgements Differ? Do Company Codes Make a Difference. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 28 (4):307 - 322.score: 14.0
    When faced with an ambiguous ethical situation related to computer technology (CT), the individual's course of action is influenced by personal experiences and opinions, consideration of what co-workers would do in the same situation, and an expectation of what the organization might sanction. In this article, the judgement of over three-hundred Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) members concerning the actions taken in a series of CT ethical scenarios are examined. Respondents expressed their personal judgement, as well as their perception (...)
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  13. Margaret Anne Defeyter & Tim P. German (2003). Acquiring an Understanding of Design: Evidence From Children's Insight Problem Solving. Cognition 89 (2):133-155.score: 14.0
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  14. Margaret Anne Pierce, Jacques Berleur, Joseph R. Herkert, Dorothy E. Denning, Charles Dunlop & Chuck Huff (1996). Responses to “The Consequences of Computing”. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 26 (1):7-10.score: 14.0
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  15. Amir Amin Yazdi, Tim P. German, Margaret Anne Defeyter & Michael Siegal (2006). Competence and Performance in Belief-Desire Reasoning Across Two Cultures: The Truth, the Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth About False Belief? Cognition 100 (2):343-368.score: 14.0
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  16. Margaret Anne Fohl (forthcoming). Book Review: Premarital Guidance. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (4):446-446.score: 14.0
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  17. Robert P. Lovering (2004). Mary Anne Warren on “Full” Moral Status. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):509-530.score: 12.0
    In the contemporary debate on moral status, it is not uncommon to find philosophers who embrace the following basic moral principle: -/- The Principle of Full Moral Status: The degree to which an entity E possesses moral status is proportional to the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties until a threshold degree of morally relevant properties possession is reached, whereupon the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties may continue to increase, but the degree to which E (...)
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  18. Anne Margaret Baxley (2003). Autocracy and Autonomy. Kant-Studien 94 (1):1-23.score: 12.0
  19. Jeanette Bicknell (2010). Love, Beauty, and Yeats's "Anne Gregory". Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):348-358.score: 12.0
    So begins "For Anne Gregory," published by W. B. Yeats in 1933. It is surely one of his most charming poems.1 The poem's lilting rhythm and affectionate tone effectively soften—even disguise—what is arguably a dark and dismaying message. Anne is destined to be loved not for herself alone, but for an accidental physical attribute—her blond hair. Why do I claim that the poem's message is dark? Why should it dismay Anne if she is loved for the beauty (...)
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  20. Anne Margaret Baxley (2008). Pleasure, Freedom and Grace: Schiller's “Completion” of Kant's Ethics. Inquiry 51 (1):1 – 15.score: 12.0
  21. Karen Detlefsen (2009). Margaret Cavendish on the Relation Between God and World. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):421-438.score: 12.0
    It has often been noted that Margaret Cavendish discusses God in her writings on natural philosophy far more than one might think she ought to given her explicit claim that a study of God belongs to theology which is to be kept strictly separate from studies in natural philosophy. In this article, I examine one way in which God enters substantially into her natural philosophy, namely the role he plays in her particular version of teleology. I conclude that, while (...)
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  22. Karen Detlefsen (2007). Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.score: 12.0
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world (...)
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  23. Aaron Simmons (2007). A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.score: 12.0
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
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  24. Anne Margaret Baxley (2007). Kantian Virtue. Philosophy Compass 2 (3):396–410.score: 12.0
  25. Anne Margaret Baxley (2007). The Price of Virtue. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):403–423.score: 12.0
    Aristotle famously held that there is a crucial difference between the person who merely acts rightly and the person who is wholehearted in what she does. He captures this contrast by insisting on a distinction between continence and full virtue. One way of accounting for the important difference here is to suppose that, for the genuinely virtuous person, the requirements of virtue "silence" competing reasons for action. I argue that the silencing interpretation is not compelling. As Aristotle rightly saw, virtue (...)
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  26. Anne Margaret Baxley (2005). The Practical Significance of Taste in Kant's Critique of Judgment: Love of Natural Beauty as a Mark of Moral Character. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):33–45.score: 12.0
  27. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the (...)
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  28. Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann, Margaret Little, Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth M. Armstrong & Lisa Harris (2009). Finding Autonomy in Birth. Bioethics 23 (1):1-8.score: 12.0
    Over the last several years, as cesarean deliveries have grown increasingly common, there has been a great deal of public and professional interest in the phenomenon of women 'choosing' to deliver by cesarean section in the absence of any specific medical indication. The issue has sparked intense conversation, as it raises questions about the nature of autonomy in birth. Whereas mainstream bioethical discourse is used to associating autonomy with having a large array of choices, this conception of autonomy does not (...)
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  29. Deborah Boyle (2013). Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom. Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.score: 12.0
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. (...)
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  30. Jane Duran (1989). Anne Viscountess Conway: A Seventeenth Century Rationalist. Hypatia 4 (1):64 - 79.score: 12.0
    The work of Spinoza, Descartes and Leibniz is cited in an attempt to develop, both expositorily and critically, the philosophy of Anne Viscountess Conway. Broadly, it is contended that Conway's metaphysics, epistemology and account of the passions not only bear intriguing comparison with the work of the other well-known rationalists, but supersede them in some ways, particularly insofar as the notions of substance and ontological hierarchy are concerned. Citing the commentary of Loptson and Carolyn Merchant, and alluding to other (...)
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  31. Anne Margaret Baxley (2009). Review: Wood, Kantian Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 627-629.score: 12.0
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  32. Jane Duran (2010). Margaret Fuller and Transcendental Feminism. The Pluralist 5 (1):65-72.score: 12.0
    Margaret Fuller's name today often appears when the Transcendentalists in general are mentioned-we may hear of her in the course of writing on Emerson, or Bronson Alcott-but not nearly enough work about Margaret herself, her thought, and her remarkable childhood has been done in recent times.1 Interestingly enough, her name surfaces in connection with some theorizing done about same-sex relationships, but the great import of Fuller's editing of "The Dial," a periodical of the time, her authoring of Woman (...)
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  33. Anne Margaret Baxley (2012). The Problem of Obligation, the Finite Rational Will, and Kantian Value Realism. Inquiry 55 (6):567-583.score: 12.0
    Abstract Robert Stern's Understanding Moral Obligation is a remarkable achievement, representing an original reading of Kant's contribution to modern moral philosophy and the legacy he bequeathed to his later-eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century successors in the German tradition. On Stern's interpretation, it was not the threat to autonomy posed by value realism, but the threat to autonomy posed by the obligatory nature of morality that led Kant to develop his critical moral theory grounded in the concept of the self-legislating moral agent. Accordingly, (...)
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  34. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong, Lisa H. Harris, Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann & Margaret Olivia Little (2009). Risk and the Pregnant Body. Hastings Center Report 39 (6):34-42.score: 12.0
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  35. Anne Margaret Baxley (2010). The Aesthetics of Morality: Schiller's Critique of Kantian Rationalism. Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1084-1095.score: 12.0
  36. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca. Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.score: 12.0
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
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  37. Margaret J. Osler & Richard A. Watson (2003). Reply by Margaret J. Osler and Richard A. Watson. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):407-407.score: 12.0
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  38. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Margaret Olivia Little & Ruth R. Faden (2008). A Critique of the 'Fetus as Patient'. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):42 – 44.score: 12.0
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  39. Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century. (Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages, 7.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. 1: Pp. Lxix, 1–468; 1 Black-and-White Figure. 2: Pp. Iv, 469–1040. €120. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (2):377-379.score: 12.0
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  40. Jeffrey Epstein (2012). Anne O'Byrne: Natality and Finitude. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):153-159.score: 12.0
    Anne O’Byrne: Natality and finitude Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11007-011-9203-8 Authors Jeffrey Epstein, SUNY Stony Brook, 213 Harriman Hall, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3750, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842.
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  41. Ruth R. Faden, Margaret Olivia Little & Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2011). Reframing the Framework: Toward Fair Inclusion of Pregnant Women as Participants in Research. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):50-52.score: 12.0
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  42. Darryl Macer (2010). Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, Ed. 2008. Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):259-260.score: 12.0
    Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, ed. 2008. Human genetic biobanks in Asia: Politics of trust and scientific advancement Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9234-6 Authors Darryl Macer, UNESCO Bangkok Regional Adviser in Social and Human Sciences for Asia and the Pacific, Regional Unit for Social and Human Sciences in Asia and the Pacific (RUSHSAP) 920 Sukhumvit Road, Prakanong Bangkok 10110 Thailand Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 7 Journal Issue Volume 7, Number 2.
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  43. Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's. Hypatia 17 (1).score: 12.0
    : Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  44. Marelene Rayner-Canham & Geoff Rayner-Canham (2011). Anne-Marie Weidler Kubanek: Nothing Less Than an Adventure: Ellen Gleditsch and Her Life in Science. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):251-252.score: 12.0
    Anne-Marie Weidler Kubanek: Nothing less than an adventure: Ellen Gleditsch and her life in science Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10698-011-9119-8 Authors Marelene Rayner-Canham, Memorial University, Grenfell Campus, Corner Brook, NL, Canada Geoff Rayner-Canham, Memorial University, Grenfell Campus, Corner Brook, NL, Canada Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238.
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  45. Margaret Battin (2009). Margaret Battin Replies. Hastings Center Report 39 (2):8-8.score: 12.0
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  46. Robert Stern (2012). A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 55 (6):622-654.score: 12.0
    Abstract In this paper, I respond to three commentators on my book Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel Kierkegaard. Anne Margaret Baxley focuses on my treatment of Kant, Dean Moyar on my treatment of Hegel, and William Bristow on my treatment of Kierkegaard. In this reply, I try to show how the critical points that they raise can be addressed.
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  47. Anne Margaret Baxley (2003). The Beautiful Soul and the Autocratic Agent: Schiller's and Kant's Children of the House. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):493-514.score: 12.0
  48. Anne Margaret Baxley (2003). Does Kantian Virtue Amount to More Than Continence? Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):559 - 586.score: 12.0
  49. Anne Margaret Baxley (2013). Review: Deligiorgi, The Scope of Autonomy: Kant and the Morality of Freedom. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):807-809.score: 12.0
  50. Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings. Hypatia 17 (1):156 - 173.score: 12.0
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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