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Profile: Margaret Gilbert (University of California, Irvine)
Profile: Margaret Gilbert (University of California, Irvine)
Profile: Margaret Patricia Gilbert (University of California, Irvine)
  1. Margaret P. Gilbert, Acting Together, Joint Commitment, and Obligation.
    What is it to do something with another person? In the author's book On Social Facts and elsewhere, she has conjectured that a special type of commitment - joint commitment - lies at the root of acting together and many other central social phenomena. Here she surveys some data pertinent to this conjecture, including the assumption of those who act together that they have associated rights against and obligations towards each other. She explains what joint commitment is, how it relates (...)
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  2. Margaret P. Gilbert, Collective Remorse.
    This essay explores the nature of an important collective emotion, namely, collective remorse. Three accounts of collective remorse are presented and evaluated. The first involves an aggregate of group members remorseful over acts of their own associated with their group's act; the second an aggregate of persons remorseful over their group's act. The third account posits, in terms that are explained, a joint commitment of a group's members to constitute as far as is possible a single remorseful body. Construed according (...)
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  3. Margaret P. Gilbert, Collective Wrongdoing: Moral and Legal Responses.
    This is a review essay of Christopher Kutz's Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age, and Jonathan Bass's Stay The Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. Topics addressed include the nature of collective intentions and actions, the possibility of collective guilt, the moral responsibility of individuals in the context of collective actions.
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  4. Margaret P. Gilbert, Gilbert Harman and Judith Jarvis Thomson's Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity.
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  5. Margaret P. Gilbert, On Being Categorized in the Speech of Others.
    Some psychologists argue that in general we self-ascribe characteristics according to others' perceived reactions to us. In illustration michael argyle cites a case involving the self-Ascription of popularity. But popularity is what I here call a 'reaction-Determined characteristic, That is, A characteristic such that certain others' reacting to someone in a certain way is logically sufficient for his having it. The general import of cases involving such characteristics needs careful examination and I argue that in fact argyle's case does not (...)
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  6. Margaret P. Gilbert & Fred R. Berger, On an Argument for the Impossibility of Prediction in the Social Sciences.
    This paper criticises a line of argument adopted by peter winch, Karl popper, And others, To the effect that the course of human history cannot be predicted. On this view it is impossible to predict in a particularly detailed way certain events ('original acts') on which important social developments depend. We analyze the argument, Showing that one version fails: original acts are in principle predictable in the relevant way. A cogent version is presented; this requires a special definition for 'original (...)
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  7. Margaret Gilbert (2013). Commitment. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8. Margaret Gilbert (2013). Joint Commitment: How We Make the Social World. Oup Usa.
    This new essay collection by distinguished philosopher Margaret Gilbert provides a richly textured argument for the importance of joint commitment in our personal and public lives. Topics covered by this diverse range of essays range from marital love to patriotism, from promissory obligation to the unity of the European Union.
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  9. Margaret Gilbert (2009). A Real Unity of Them All. The Monist 92 (2):268-285.
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  10. Margaret Gilbert (2009). Pro Patria : An Essay on Patriotism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 13 (4):319 - 346.
    This essay focuses on what patriotism is, as opposed to the value of patriotism. It focuses further on the basic patriotic motive : one acts with this motive if one acts on behalf of one’s country as such. I first argue that pre-theoretically the basic patriotic motive is sufficient to make an act patriotic from a motivational point of view. In particular the agent need not ascribe virtues or achievements to his country nor need he feel towards it the emotions (...)
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  11. Margaret Gilbert (2009). Shared Intention and Personal Intentions. Philosophical Studies 144 (1):167 - 187.
    This article explores the question: what is it for two or more people to intend to do something in the future? In a technical phrase, what is it for people to share an intention ? Extending and refining earlier work of the author’s, it argues for three criteria of adequacy for an account of shared intention (the disjunction, concurrence, and obligation criteria) and offers an account that satisfies them. According to this account, in technical terms explained in the paper, people (...)
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  12. Margaret P. Gilbert (2009). Obligation and Joint Commitment. Utilitas 11 (02):143-.
    I argue that obligations of an important type inhere in what I call 'joint commitments'. I propose a joint commitment account of everyday agreements. This could explain why some philosophers believe that we know of the obligating nature of agreements a priori. I compare and contrast obligations of joint commitment with obligations in the relatively narrow sense recommended by H. L. A. Hart, a recommendation that has been influential. Some central contexts in which Hart takes there to be obligations in (...)
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  13. Margaret Gilbert (2008). Two Approaches to Shared Intention: An Essay in the Philosophy of Social Phenomena. Analyse and Kritik 30 (2).
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  14. Margaret P. Gilbert (2008). Social Convention Revisited. Topoi (1-2):5-16.
    This article will compare and contrast two very different accounts of convention: the game-theoretical account of Lewis in Convention, and the account initially proposed by Margaret Gilbert (the present author) in chapter six of On Social Facts, and further elaborated here. Gilbert’s account is not a variant of Lewis’s. It was arrived at in part as the result of a detailed critique of Lewis’s account in relation to a central everyday concept of a social convention. An account of convention need (...)
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  15. Diana Meyers, Joel Kupperman, Margaret Gilbert, Sonia Michel & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (2008). Paul Bloomfield. In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.
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  16. Margaret Gilbert (2007). Commitment, and Collective Action Problems. In Fabienne Peter (ed.), Rationality and Commitment. Oxford University Press, Usa. 258.
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  17. Margaret Gilbert (2007). Collective Intentions, Commitment and Collective Action Problems. In Fabienne Peter & Hans Bernhard Schmid (eds.), Rationality and Commitment. Oup Oxford.
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  18. Margaret Gilbert (2006). A Theory of Political Obligation: Membership, Commitment, and the Bonds of Society. OUP Oxford.
    Margaret Gilbert offers an incisive new approach to a classic problem of political philosophy: when and why should I do what the laws of my country tell me to do? Beginning with carefully argued accounts of social groups in general and political societies in particular, the author argues that in central, standard senses of the relevant terms membership in a political society in and of itself obligates one to support that society's political institutions. The obligations in question are not moral (...)
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  19. Margaret Gilbert (2006). Who's to Blame? Collective Moral Responsibility and its Implications for Group Members. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):94–114.
  20. Margaret P. Gilbert (2006). Can a Wise Society Be a Free One? Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (S1):151-167.
    This article invokes the idea of a wise society, something that has received little attention from contemporary philosophers. It argues that, given plausible interpretations of the relevant terms, the wiser a society is, the less free it is. Even if one prefers a different account of a wise society, the argument in question is significant, for on this account a wise society possesses features that would seem to be desirable whatever their relationship to wisdom in particular: it makes many true (...)
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  21. Margaret P. Gilbert (2006). Character, Essence, Action: Considerations on Character Traits After Sartre. The Pluralist 1 (1):40 - 52.
    Two radically different, general accounts of human character traits - the "essentialist" and the "summary" accounts - are given critical consideration. The former account is characterized in terms of Saul Kripke's conception of metaphysical essence. Both accounts are discussed with reference to Jean-Paul Sartre's treatment of character traits. The essentialist account cannot withstand considerations relating to personal identity over time. The summary account is also rejected, as is a certain kind of dispositional account. An approach to at least some character (...)
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  22. Margaret P. Gilbert (2006). Rationality in Collective Action. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (1):3-17.
    Collective action is interpreted as a matter of people doing something together, and it is assumed that this involves their having a collective intention to do that thing together. The account of collective intention for which the author has argued elsewhere is presented. In terms that are explained, the parties are jointly committed to intend as a body that such-and-such. Collective action problems in the sense of rational choice theory—problems such as the various forms of coordination problem and the (...)
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  23. Margaret P. Gilbert (2005). Shared Values, Social Unity, and Liberty. Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (1):25-49.
    May social unity - the unity of a society or social group - be a matter of sharing values? Political philosophers disagree on this topic. Kymlicka answers: No. Devlin and Rawls answer: Yes. It is argued that given one common 'summative' account of sharing values a negative answer is correct. A positive answer is correct, however, given the plural subject account of sharing values. Given this account, those who share values are unified in a substantial way by their participation in (...)
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  24. Margaret Gilbert (2004). Scanlon on Promissory Obligation: The Problem of Promisees' Rights. Journal of Philosophy 101 (2):83 - 109.
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  25. Margaret P. Gilbert (2004). Collective Epistemology. Episteme 1 (2):95--107.
    This paper introduces the author's approach to everyday ascriptions of collective cognitive states as in such statements as we believe he is lying. Collective epistemology deals with these ascriptions attempting to understand them and the phenomena in question.
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  26. Margaret P. Gilbert (2004). Scanlon on Promissory Obligation. Journal of Philosophy 101 (2):83-109.
    This article offers a critique of Thomas Scanlon's well-known account of promissory obligation by reference to the rights of promisees. Scanlon's account invokes a moral principle, the "principle of fidelity". Now, corresponding to a promisor's obligation to perform is a promisee's right to performance. It is argued that one cannot account for this right in terms of Scanlon's principle. This is so in spite of a clause in the principle relating to the promisee's "consent", which might have been thought to (...)
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  27. Margaret Gilbert (2003). Complicity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):236-239.
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  28. Peter Baumann, Rudiger Bittner, Luc Bovens, Margaret Gilbert, Boris Hennig & Frank Hindriks (2002). Ulrich BALTZER Assistant Professor at Philosophy Department, Technical University of Dresden. Http://Www. Tu-Dresden. De/Phfiph/Dozenten/Baltzer. Htm Ubaltzer@ Rcs. Urz. Tu-Dresden. De. [REVIEW] In Georg Meggle (ed.), Social Facts & Collective Intentionality. Dr. Hänsel-Hohenhausen Ag. 475.
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  29. Margaret Gilbert (2002). Acting Together. In Georg Meggle (ed.), Social Facts & Collective Intentionality. Dr. Hänsel-Hohenhausen Ag.
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  30. Margaret Gilbert (2002). Collective Guilt and Collective Guilt Feelings. Journal of Ethics 6 (2):115-143.
    Among other things, this paper considers what so-called collective guilt feelings amount to. If collective guilt feelings are sometimes appropriate, it must be the case that collectives can indeed be guilty. The paper begins with an account of what it is for a collective to intend to do something and to act in light of that intention. An account of collective guilt in terms of membership guilt feelings is found wanting. Finally, a "plural subject" account of collective guilt feelings is (...)
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  31. Margaret Gilbert (2002). Considerations on Joint Commitment: Responses to Various Comments. In Georg Meggle (ed.), Social Facts & Collective Intentionality. Dr. Hänsel-Hohenhausen Ag. 1--73.
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  32. Margaret Gilbert (2002). Collective Wrongdoing. Social Theory and Practice 28 (1):167-187.
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  33. Margaret Gilbert (2002). Review: Ulysses Unbound: Studies in Rationality, Precommitment, and Constraints. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):399-403.
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  34. Margaret P. Gilbert (2001). Collective Preferences, Obligations, and Rational Choice. Economics and Philosophy 17 (1):109-119.
    Can teams and other collectivities have preferences of their own, preferences that are not in some way reducible to the personal preferences of their members? In short, are collective preferences possible? In everyday life people speak easily of what we prefer, where what is at issue seems to be a collective preference. This is suggested by the acceptability of such remarks as ‘My ideal walk would be . . . along rougher and less well-marked paths than we prefer as a (...)
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  35. Margaret P. Gilbert (2001). Sociality, Unity, Objectivity. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 11:153-160.
    Numerous social and political theorists have referred to social groups or societies as “unities.” What makes a unity of a social group? I address this question with special reference to the theory of social groups proposed in my books On Social Facts and Living Together: Rationality, Sociality and Obligation. I argue that social groups of a central kind require an underlying “joint commitment.” I explain what I mean by a “joint commitment” with care. If joint commitments in my sense underlie (...)
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  36. Robert Baird, Reagan Ramsower, Stuart E. Rosenbaum, Victoria Davion, Clark Wolf, John Martin Fischer, S. J. Mark Ravizza, Margaret Gilbert, Christopher W. Gowans & Jorge J. Gracia (2000). Almeder, Robert, Human Happiness and Morality: A Brief Introduction to Ethics (Amherst: Prometheus Books, 2000), 211 Pages. Audi, Robert, Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (London: Routledge, 1998), 340 Pages. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 4:419-422.
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  37. Margaret Gilbert (2000). Sociality and Responsibility: New Essays in Plural Subject Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  38. Margaret Gilbert (1999). Critical Notice: Gilbert Harman and Judith Jarvis Thomson, Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity. Noûs 33 (2):295–303.
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  39. Margaret Gilbert (1999). Considerations on Obligation. Utilitas 11:143-163.
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  40. Margaret Gilbert (1999). Reconsidering the “Actual Contract” Theory of Political Obligation. Ethics 109 (2):236-260.
    Do people have obligations by virtue of the fact that a given country is their country? Actual contract theory says they do because they have agreed to act in certain ways. Contemporary philosophers standardly object in terms of the 'no agreement' objection and the 'not morally binding' objection. I argue that the 'not morally binding' objection is not conclusive. As for the 'no agreement' objection, though actual contract theory succumbs, a closely related plural subject theory of political obligation does not. (...)
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  41. Margaret Gilbert (1999). Annette Baier, The Commons of the Mind:The Commons of the Mind. Ethics 109 (4):894-897.
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  42. Margaret Gilbert, Andrew Mason, Elizabeth S. Anderson, J. David Velleman, Matthew H. Kramer, Michele M. Moody‐Adams & Martha C. Nussbaum (1999). 10. Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy Lucius T. Outlaw, Jr., On Race and Philosophy (Pp. 454-456). Ethics 109 (2).
     
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  43. Margaret Gilbert (1998). In Search of Sociality. Philosophical Explorations 1 (3):233 – 241.
    This paper reviews some of the growing body of work in the analytic philosophy of social phenomena, with special reference to the question whether adequate accounts of particular social phenomena can be given in terms that are individualistic in a sense that is specified. The discussion focusses on accounts of what have come to be known as shared intention and action. There is also some consideration of accounts of social convention and collective belief. Particular attention is paid to the need (...)
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  44. Margaret Gilbert (1998). One For All. Philosophical Review 107 (1):135-137.
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  45. Margaret Gilbert (1998). Raimo Tuomela, The Importance of Us: A Philosophical Study of Basic Social Notions:The Importance of Us: A Philosophical Study of Basic Social Notions. Ethics 108 (4):811-812.
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  46. Margaret Gilbert (1997). Group Wrongs and Guilt Feelings. Journal of Ethics 1 (1):65-84.
    Can it ever be appropriate to feel guilt just because one's group has acted badly? Some say no, citing supposed features of guilt feelings as such. If one understands group action according to my plural subject account of groups, however, one can argue for the appropriateness of feeling guilt just because one's group has acted badly - a feeling that often occurs. In so arguing I sketch a plural subject account of groups, group intentions and group actions: for a group (...)
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  47. Kenneth J. Gergen, Margaret Gilbert, H. S. Gordon, Rom Harrè, Tim Ingold, Raymond I. M. Lee, Peter Manicas, Joseph Margolis, Lloyd Sandelands, Paul F. Secord, Jonathan H. Turner & Walter L. Wallace (1996). The Mark of the Social: Discovery or Invention? Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  48. Margaret Gilbert (1996). Rationality and Coordination Cambridge Studies in Probability, Induction, and Decision Theory. Philosophical Review 105 (1):105-108.
  49. Margaret Gilbert (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 103 (412):423-445.
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  50. Margaret Gilbert (1994). Me, You, and Us: Distinguishing “Egoism,” “Altruism,” and “Groupism”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):621.
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