Search results for 'Margaret Hall' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rosaleen Murphy, Kathy Hall, Anna Ridgway, Mary Horgan, Maura Cunneen & Denice Cunningham (2011). Response to Margaret MacDonald's Review of Loris Malaguzzi and the Reggio Emilia Experience. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):641-643.score: 360.0
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  2. Joshua C. Hall (2007). Margaret Pugh O'Mara: Cities of Knowledge: Cold War Science and the Search for the Next Silicon Valley. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (3):207-209.score: 360.0
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  3. Mary Kate McGowan, Shan Shan Tam & Margaret Hall (2009). “On Indirect Speech Acts and Linguistic Communication: A Response to Bertolet”. Philosophy 84 (4):495-513.score: 240.0
    Suppose a diner says, 'Can you pass the salt?' Although her utterance is literally a question (about the physical abilities of the addressee), most would take it as a request (that the addressee pass the salt). In such a case, the request is performed indirectly by way of directly asking a question. Accordingly this utterance is known as an indirect speech act. On the standard account of such speech acts, a single utterance constitutes two distinct speech acts. On this account (...)
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  4. James W. Hall, Beverly E. Cox & Margaret B. Tinzmann (1984). Recall of Categorized and Unrelated Lists with Complete Versus Discrete Presentation and Fast Versus Moderate Presentation Rates. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (5):398-400.score: 240.0
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  5. James W. Hall & Margaret B. Tinzmann (1989). Sources of Improved Recall During the School Years. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (4):315-316.score: 240.0
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  6. James W. Hall, Audrey Ewing, Margaret B. Tinzmann & Kim P. Wilson (1981). Phonetic Coding in Dyslexics and Normal Readers. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (4):177-178.score: 240.0
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  7. James W. Hall & Margaret B. Tinzmann (1985). Presentation-Rate Effects and Age Differences in Children's Free Recall. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (3):227-229.score: 240.0
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  8. C. Margaret Hall (1973). Vital Life; Questions in Social Thought. North Quincy, Mass.,Christopher Pub. House.score: 240.0
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  9. Margaret B. Tinzmann & James W. Hall (1989). Nonstrategic Factors Underlie Improvements in Free Recall During Middle Childhood. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (4):317-319.score: 240.0
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  10. Everett W. Hall (1958). Hochberg on What is `Fitting' for Ewing and Hall. Mind 67 (265):104-106.score: 180.0
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  11. J. R. Hall (2010). Thomas N. Hall and Donald Scragg, Eds., Anglo-Saxon Books and Their Readers: Essays in Celebration of Helmut Gneuss's “Handlist of Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts.” (Publications of the Richard Rawlinson Center.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 2008. Paper. Pp. Xvi, 181; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):680-682.score: 180.0
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  12. Brian Meeks & Stuart Hall (eds.) (2007). Culture, Politics, Race and Diaspora: The Thought of Stuart Hall. Lawrence & Wishart.score: 180.0
  13. Joshua Maloy Hall (2014). Self-Mimetic Curved Silvering: Dancing with Irigaray. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (1):76-101.score: 120.0
    In lieu of an abstract, here is the opening paragraph of the essay: One of Luce Irigaray’s many important contributions to philosophy consists in invoking dance more frequently than any other canonical Western philosopher. Unfortunately, however, her treatment of dance has rarely been treated substantively in the secondary literature, especially in regard to her most influential commentators, including Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grosz, and Margaret Whitford. Accordingly, I will begin my first section by situating the theme of dance in Irigaray’s (...)
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  14. Cheryl Ann Hall (2007). Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy. Hypatia 22 (4):81-95.score: 60.0
    : Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.
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  15. Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall (2007). The Social Implications of Neurobiological Explanations of Resistible Compulsions. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):15 – 17.score: 60.0
    The authors comments on several articles on addiction. Research suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The authors maintain that a proper study of addiction must include a neurobiological model of addiction to draw the attention of bioethicists and addiction neurobiologists. They also state that more addiction neuroscientists like S. E. Hyman are needed as they understand the limits of their research. Accession Number: 24077921; Authors: Carter, Adrian 1; Email Address: adrian.carter@uq.edu.au Hall, Wayne 1; (...)
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  16. Jerome Hall (1949/1982). Living Law of Democratic Society. F.B. Rothman.score: 60.0
    Hall discusses the ideas of modern day legal philosophers such as Duguit, Geny, Ehrlich, & Kelsen, & what their conceptions mean to a democratic society.
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  17. Mark A. Hall (1997). Making Medical Spending Decisions: The Law, Ethics, and Economics of Rationing Mechanisms. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book explores the making of health care rationing decisions through the analysis of three alternative decision makers: patients paying out of pocket; officials setting limits on treatments and coverage; and physicians at the bedside. Hall develops this analysis along three dimensions: political economics, ethics, and law. The economic dimension addresses the practical feasibility of each method. The ethical dimension discusses the moral aspects of these methods, while the legal dimension traces the most recent developments in jurisprudence and health (...)
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  18. Roger T. Ames & David L. Hall (2003). Dao De Jing: Making This Life Significant: A Philosophical Translation. Ballantine Books.score: 60.0
    Composed more than 2,000 years ago during a turbulent period of Chinese history, the Dao de jing set forth an alternative vision of reality in a world torn apart by violence and betrayal. Daoism, as this subtle but enduring philosophy came to be known, offers a comprehensive view of experience grounded in a full understanding of the wonders hidden in the ordinary. Now in this luminous new translation, based on the recently discovered ancient bamboo scrolls, China scholars Roger T. Ames (...)
     
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  19. Margaret MacDonald (2011). Review of Kathy Hall Et Al. Loris Malaguzzi and the Reggio Emilia Experience. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):631-639.score: 36.0
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  20. Margaret Hubbard (1970). The Poetics D. W. Lucas: Aristotle, Poetics. Introduction, Commentary, and Appendixes. Pp. Xxviii+313. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1968. Cloth, 50s. Net. Leon Golden and O. B. Hardison: Aristotle, Poetics. A Translation and Commentary for Students of Literature. Pp. Xi+307. Hemel Hempstead: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1968. Stiff Paper, 26s. L. J. Potts: Aristotle on the Art of Fiction. An English Translation of the Poetics with an Introductory Essay and Explanatory Notes. Pp. 94. Cambridge: University Press, 1968. Stiff Paper, 7s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (2):176-181.score: 36.0
  21. A. D. Lindsay (1945). The Good and the Clever. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.score: 30.0
    THE GOOD 8 THE CLEVER say, those charming verses of Miss Wordsworth's, the first Principal of Lady Margaret Hall. A text, however familiar, is read at the beginning of the discourse, so I shall begin by reading the verses: I WISH to take,  ...
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  22. Bartholomew Ryan (2014). Kierkegaard's Indirect Politics: Interludes with Lukács, Schmitt, Benjamin and Adorno. Editions Rodopi.score: 30.0
    This book argues that a radical political gesture can be found in Søren Kierkegaard’s writings. The chapters navigate an interdisciplinary landscape by placing Kierkegaard’s passionate thought in conversation with the writings of Georg Lukács, Carl Schmitt, Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno. At the heart of the book’s argument is the concept of “indirect politics,” which names a negative space between methods, concepts, and intellectual acts in the work of Kierkegaard, as well as marking the dynamic relations between Kierkegaard and the (...)
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  23. Darren Bradley & Branden Fitelson (2003). Monty Hall, Doomsday and Confirmation. Analysis 63 (277):23–31.score: 24.0
    We give an analysis of the Monty Hall problem purely in terms of confirmation, without making any lottery assumptions about priors. Along the way, we show the Monty Hall problem is structurally identical to the Doomsday Argument.
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  24. Peter Baumann (2008). Single-Case Probabilities and the Case of Monty Hall: Levy's View. Synthese 162 (2):265 - 273.score: 24.0
    In Baumann (American Philosophical Quarterly 42: 71–79, 2005) I argued that reflections on a variation of the Monty Hall problem throws a very general skeptical light on the idea of single-case probabilities. Levy (Synthese, forthcoming, 2007) puts forward some interesting objections which I answer here.
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  25. Jan Sprenger (2010). Probability, Rational Single-Case Decisions and the Monty Hall Problem. Synthese 174 (3):331 - 340.score: 24.0
    The application of probabilistic arguments to rational decisions in a single case is a contentious philosophical issue which arises in various contexts. Some authors (e.g. Horgan, Philos Pap 24:209–222, 1995; Levy, Synthese 158:139–151, 2007) affirm the normative force of probabilistic arguments in single cases while others (Baumann, Am Philos Q 42:71–79, 2005; Synthese 162:265–273, 2008) deny it. I demonstrate that both sides do not give convincing arguments for their case and propose a new account of the relationship between probabilistic reasoning (...)
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  26. Ken Levy (2007). Baumann on the Monty Hall Problem and Single-Case Probabilities. Synthese 158 (1):139 - 151.score: 24.0
    Peter Baumann uses the Monty Hall game to demonstrate that probabilities cannot be meaningfully applied to individual games. Baumann draws from this first conclusion a second: in a single game, it is not necessarily rational to switch from the door that I have initially chosen to the door that Monty Hall did not open. After challenging Baumann’s particular arguments for these conclusions, I argue that there is a deeper problem with his position: it rests on the false assumption (...)
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  27. Walter Horn (2013). The Roots of Representationism: An Introduction to Everett Hall. LAP Lambert.score: 24.0
    American philosopher Everett W. Hall (1901-1960) was among the first epistemologists writing in English to have promoted “representationism,” a currently popular explanation of cognition. According to this school, there are no private sense-data or qualia, because the ascription (representation) of public properties that are exemplified in the world of common sense is believed to be sufficient to explain mental content. In this timely volume, Walter Horn, perhaps the foremost living expert on Hall’s philosophy, not only provides copious excerpts (...)
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  28. Graeme Smith (2007). Margaret Thatcher's Christian Faith: A Case Study in Political Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):233 - 257.score: 24.0
    Throughout the 1980s Margaret Thatcher dominated British and global politics. At the same time she maintained an active Christian faith, which she understood as shaping and informing her political choices and policies. In this article I argue that we can construct from Thatcher's key speeches, her memoirs, and her book on public policy a cultural "theo-political" identity which guided her political decisions. Thatcher's identity was as an Anglo-Saxon Nonconformist. This consisted of her belief in values such as thrift and (...)
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  29. Kerry Manders (2012). Stay the Night: Meera Margaret Singh at the Gladstone Hotel. Mediatropes 3 (2):109-132.score: 24.0
    This essay examines Meera Margaret Singh’s exhibition Nightingale in the time and place of the liminal space we call “hotel.” In intertexual dialogue with Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, the author not only reviews Singh’s intimate photographs of her mother, she reads the images with and against the architecture in which they are exhibited. The Gladstone as exhibition space redoubles Singh’s emphasis on the tense connectivity of apparent binaries: youth and age, public and private, artist and model, object and spectator, (...)
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  30. Thomas Sturm (2001). Margaret S. Archer, Being Human: The Problem of Agency. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 5 (46).score: 21.0
    A review which, among other criticisms of Archer's book, discusses some philosophical problems concerning talk of the "self" in the human sciences.
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  31. Charles Hartshorne (1961). Professor Hall on Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (June):563-571.score: 21.0
  32. Salah Labhalla & Henri Lombardi (1996). Analyse de complexité pour un théorème de Hall sur les fractions continues. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 42 (1):134-144.score: 21.0
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  33. Martijn Boven (2012). Review of Henry Somers-Hall. Hegel, Deleuze, and the Critique of Representation: Dialectics of Negation and Difference. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):384-386.score: 18.0
    In this rich and impressive new book, Henry Somers-Hall gives a nuanced analysis of the philosophical relationship between G. W. F. Hegel and Gilles Deleuze. He convincingly shows that a serious study of Hegel provides an improved insight into Deleuze’s conception of pure difference as the transcendental condition of identity. Somers-Hall develops his argument in three steps. First, both Hegel and Deleuze formulate a critique of representation. Second, Hegel’s proposed alternative is as logically consistent as Deleuze’s. Third, Deleuze (...)
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  34. John F. Halpin (1998). Lewis, Thau, and Hall on Chance and the Best-System Account of Law. Philosophy of Science 65 (2):349-360.score: 18.0
    August 16, 1997 David Lewis2 has long defended an account of scientific law acceptable even to an empiricist with significant metaphysical scruples. On this account, the laws are defined to be the consequences of the best system for axiomitizing all occurrent fact. Here "best system" means the set of sentences which yields the best combination of strength of descriptive content 3 with simplicity of exposition. And occurrent facts, the facts to be systematized, are roughly the particular facts about a localized (...)
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  35. Karen Detlefsen (2007). Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.score: 18.0
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world (...)
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  36. Karen Detlefsen (2009). Margaret Cavendish on the Relation Between God and World. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):421-438.score: 18.0
    It has often been noted that Margaret Cavendish discusses God in her writings on natural philosophy far more than one might think she ought to given her explicit claim that a study of God belongs to theology which is to be kept strictly separate from studies in natural philosophy. In this article, I examine one way in which God enters substantially into her natural philosophy, namely the role he plays in her particular version of teleology. I conclude that, while (...)
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  37. Víctor Rodríguez (2013). The Quantum Hall Effect and its Contexts. Scientiae Studia 11 (1):141-158.score: 18.0
    En este artículo, se atienden ciertas facetas conceptuales y experimentales del efecto Hall cuántico. Se argumenta que el mismo ofrece variados matices para la reflexión filosófica, desde la generación de entidades teóricas hasta la epistemología de la experimentación. La exposición pretende mantener cierta sensibilidad por la dinámica histórica en torno del tema, como así también por las implicaciones metrológicas de ámbitos cuánticos específicos. Dada la enorme producción científica sobre el tema, se hace un recorte a los fines de rescatar (...)
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  38. Jane Duran (2010). Margaret Fuller and Transcendental Feminism. The Pluralist 5 (1):65-72.score: 18.0
    Margaret Fuller's name today often appears when the Transcendentalists in general are mentioned-we may hear of her in the course of writing on Emerson, or Bronson Alcott-but not nearly enough work about Margaret herself, her thought, and her remarkable childhood has been done in recent times.1 Interestingly enough, her name surfaces in connection with some theorizing done about same-sex relationships, but the great import of Fuller's editing of "The Dial," a periodical of the time, her authoring of Woman (...)
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  39. Ana Franco-Watkins, Peter Derks & Michael Dougherty (2003). Reasoning in the Monty Hall Problem: Examining Choice Behaviour and Probability Judgements. Thinking and Reasoning 9 (1):67 – 90.score: 18.0
    This research examined choice behaviour and probability judgement in a counterintuitive reasoning problem called the Monty Hall problem (MHP). In Experiments 1 and 2 we examined whether learning from a simulated card game similar to the MHP affected how people solved the MHP. Results indicated that the experience with the card game affected participants' choice behaviour, in that participants selected to switch in the MHP. However, it did not affect their understanding of the objective probabilities. This suggests that there (...)
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  40. Deborah Boyle (2013). Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom. Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.score: 18.0
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. (...)
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  41. Walter Horn (2010). Reid and Hall on Perceptual Relativity and Error. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (2):115-145.score: 18.0
    Epistemological realists have long struggled to explain perceptual error without introducing a tertium quid between perceivers and physical objects. Two leading realist philosophers, Thomas Reid and Everett Hall, agreed in denying that mental entities are the immediate objects of perceptions of the external world, but each relied upon strange metaphysical entities of his own in the construction of a realist philosophy of perception. Reid added ‘visible figures’ to sensory impressions and specific sorts of mental events, while Hall utilized (...)
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  42. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca. Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.score: 18.0
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
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  43. Margaret J. Osler & Richard A. Watson (2003). Reply by Margaret J. Osler and Richard A. Watson. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):407-407.score: 18.0
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  44. Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century. (Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages, 7.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. 1: Pp. Lxix, 1–468; 1 Black-and-White Figure. 2: Pp. Iv, 469–1040. €120. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (2):377-379.score: 18.0
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  45. Darryl Macer (2010). Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, Ed. 2008. Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):259-260.score: 18.0
    Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, ed. 2008. Human genetic biobanks in Asia: Politics of trust and scientific advancement Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9234-6 Authors Darryl Macer, UNESCO Bangkok Regional Adviser in Social and Human Sciences for Asia and the Pacific, Regional Unit for Social and Human Sciences in Asia and the Pacific (RUSHSAP) 920 Sukhumvit Road, Prakanong Bangkok 10110 Thailand Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 7 Journal Issue Volume 7, Number 2.
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  46. Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's. Hypatia 17 (1).score: 18.0
    : Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  47. Margaret Battin (2009). Margaret Battin Replies. Hastings Center Report 39 (2):8-8.score: 18.0
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  48. Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings. Hypatia 17 (1):156 - 173.score: 18.0
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  49. Zelia Gregoriou (2013). Pedagogy and Passages: The Performativity of Margaret Cavendish's Utopian Fiction. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):457-474.score: 18.0
    This article explores the pedagogical significance of non-static and hybrid utopian readings and writings by focusing on Margaret Cavendish's educationally-philosophically neglected female utopia The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. It questions the exaggerated, inflated and exclusivist emphasis on the pedagogical benefits of homologous spatial signifiers of entry into utopia and return to home and draws examples of utopian passages across genres, texts, minds and worlds from the writing of Cavendish. Such passages can be read as (...)
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  50. Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century.(Skaldic Poetry of The. [REVIEW] Speculum 85:377-379.score: 18.0
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