Search results for 'Margaret Keatings' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  35
    Margaret Keatings & Diana Dick (1989). Ethics and Politics of Resource Allocation: The Role of Nursing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):187 - 192.
    The use of ethics in everyday nursing practice will become increasingly important to the individual nurse, and nursing as a profession, as technology has a greater impact on health status and the provision of health care. Resource allocation is only one example of an ethical issue in which nursing must have input. Nursing can expand its contribution to society by ensuring that it plays a major role in shaping public policy and legislation. If nursing is to continue to serve the (...)
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  2.  4
    Kerry Manders (2012). Stay the Night: Meera Margaret Singh at the Gladstone Hotel. Mediatropes 3 (2):109-132.
    This essay examines Meera Margaret Singh’s exhibition Nightingale in the time and place of the liminal space we call “hotel.” In intertexual dialogue with Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, the author not only reviews Singh’s intimate photographs of her mother, she reads the images with and against the architecture in which they are exhibited. The Gladstone as exhibition space redoubles Singh’s emphasis on the tense connectivity of apparent binaries: youth and age, public and private, artist and model, object and spectator, (...)
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  3.  6
    Graeme Smith (2007). Margaret Thatcher's Christian Faith: A Case Study in Political Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):233 - 257.
    Throughout the 1980s Margaret Thatcher dominated British and global politics. At the same time she maintained an active Christian faith, which she understood as shaping and informing her political choices and policies. In this article I argue that we can construct from Thatcher's key speeches, her memoirs, and her book on public policy a cultural "theo-political" identity which guided her political decisions. Thatcher's identity was as an Anglo-Saxon Nonconformist. This consisted of her belief in values such as thrift and (...)
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  4.  20
    Thomas Sturm (2001). Margaret S. Archer, Being Human: The Problem of Agency. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 5 (46).
    A review which, among other criticisms of Archer's book, discusses some philosophical problems concerning talk of the "self" in the human sciences.
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  5.  64
    Peter Beilbarz (1992). Reviews : Fredric Jameson, Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (Duke/Verso, 1991); Margaret Rose, The Post-Modern and the Post-Industrial (Cambridge University Press, 1991); Alex Callinicos, Against Postmodernism: A Marxist Critique (Cambridge, Polity, 1990). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 33 (1):167-171.
    Reviews : Fredric Jameson, Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism ; Margaret Rose, The Post-Modern and the Post-Industrial ; Alex Callinicos, Against Postmodernism: A Marxist Critique.
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  6.  70
    Stewart Duncan, Minds Everywhere: Margaret Cavendish’s Anti-Mechanist Materialism.
    This paper considers Margaret Cavendish's distinctive anti-mechanist materialism, focusing on her 1664 Philosophical Letters, in which she discusses the views of Hobbes, Descartes, and More, among others. The paper examines Cavendish's views about natural, material souls: the soul of nature, the souls of finite individuals, and the relation between them. After briefly digressing to look at Cavendish's views about divine, supernatural souls, the paper then turns to the reasons for Cavendish's disagreement with mechanist accounts. There are disagreements over the (...)
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  7.  22
    Boaz Miller (forthcoming). “Trust Me—I’M a Public Intellectual”: Margaret Atwood’s and David Suzuki’s Social Epistemologies of Climate Science. In Michael Keren & Richard Hawkins‎ (eds.), Speaking Power to Truth: Knowledge and the Public Intellectual in a Changing World‎. Athabasca University Press‎
    Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki are two of the most prominent Canadian public ‎intellectuals ‎involved in the global warming debate. They both argue that anthropogenic global ‎warming is ‎occurring, warn against its grave consequences, and urge governments and the ‎public to take ‎immediate, decisive, extensive, and profound measures to prevent it. They differ, ‎however, in the ‎reasons and evidence they provide in support of their position. While Suzuki ‎stresses the scientific ‎evidence in favour of the global warming theory and (...)
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  8.  7
    Deborah Boyle (2015). Margaret Cavendish on Perception, Self‐Knowledge, and Probable Opinion. Philosophy Compass 10 (7):438-450.
    Scholarly interest in Margaret Cavendish's philosophical views has steadily increased over the past decade, but her epistemology has received little attention, and no consensus has emerged; Cavendish has been characterized as a skeptic, as a rationalist, as presenting an alternative epistemology to both rationalism and empiricism, and even as presenting no clear theory of knowledge at all. This paper concludes that Cavendish was only a modest skeptic, for she believed that humans can achieve knowledge through sensitive and rational perception (...)
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  9.  10
    Bruno J. Strasser (2010). Collecting, Comparing, and Computing Sequences: The Making of Margaret O. Dayhoff's "Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure", 1954–1965. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (4):623 - 660.
    Collecting, comparing, and computing molecular sequences are among the most prevalent practices in contemporary biological research. They represent a specific way of producing knowledge. This paper explores the historical development of these practices, focusing on the work of Margaret O. Dayhoff, Richard V. Eck, and Robert S. Ledley, who produced the first computer-based collection of protein sequences, published in book format in 1965 as the Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure. While these practices are generally associated with the rise (...)
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  10.  11
    Zelia Gregoriou (2013). Pedagogy and Passages: The Performativity of Margaret Cavendish's Utopian Fiction. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):457-474.
    This article explores the pedagogical significance of non-static and hybrid utopian readings and writings by focusing on Margaret Cavendish's educationally-philosophically neglected female utopia The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. It questions the exaggerated, inflated and exclusivist emphasis on the pedagogical benefits of homologous spatial signifiers of entry into utopia and return to home and draws examples of utopian passages across genres, texts, minds and worlds from the writing of Cavendish. Such passages can be read as (...)
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  11. Karen Detlefsen (2007). Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world (...)
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  12.  28
    Deborah Boyle (2013). Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom. Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. (...)
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  13.  3
    Martin Lipscomb (2006). Rebutting the Suggestion That Anthony Giddens's Structuration Theory Offers a Useful Framework for Sociological Nursing Research: A Critique Based Upon Margaret Archer's Realist Social Theory. Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):175-180.
    A recent paper in this journal by Hardcastle et al. in 2005 argued that Anthony Giddens’s Structuration Theory might usefully inform sociological nursing research. In response, a critique of ST based upon the Realist Social Theory of Margaret Archer is presented. Archer maintains that ST is fatally flawed and, in consequence, it has little to offer nursing research. Following an analysis of the concepts epiphenomenalism and elisionism, it is suggested that emergentist Realist Social Theory captures or describes a more (...)
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  14.  56
    Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings. Hypatia 17 (1):156 - 173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  15.  10
    Bernard G. Prusak (2011). Double Effect, All Over Again: The Case of Sister Margaret McBride. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):271-283.
    As media reports have made widely known, in November 2009, the ethics committee of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona, permitted the abortion of an eleven-week-old fetus in order to save the life of its mother. This woman was suffering from acute pulmonary hypertension, which her doctors judged would prove fatal for both her and her previable child. The ethics committee believed abortion to be permitted in this case under the so-called principle of double effect, but Thomas J. Olmsted, the (...)
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  16.  12
    Eugene Marshall, Cavendish, Margaret.
    Margaret Cavendish Margaret Lucas Cavendish, the Duchess of Newcastle, was a philosopher, poet, playwright and essayist. Her philosophical writings were concerned mostly with issues of metaphysics and natural philosophy, but also extended to social and political concerns. Like Hobbes and Descartes, she rejected what she took to be the occult explanations of the Scholastics. […].
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  17.  38
    Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca. Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
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  18.  19
    Jacqueline Broad (2007). Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion, and Witchcraft. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 38 (3):493-505.
    Many scholars point to the close association between early modern science and the rise of rational arguments in favour of the existence of witches. For some commentators, it is a poor reflection on science that its methods so easily lent themselves to the unjust persecution of innocent men and women. In this paper, I examine a debate about witches between a woman philosopher, Margaret Cavendish , and a fellow of the Royal Society, Joseph Glanvill . I argue that Cavendish (...)
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  19. Karen Detlefsen (2009). Margaret Cavendish on the Relation Between God and World. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):421-438.
    It has often been noted that Margaret Cavendish discusses God in her writings on natural philosophy far more than one might think she ought to given her explicit claim that a study of God belongs to theology which is to be kept strictly separate from studies in natural philosophy. In this article, I examine one way in which God enters substantially into her natural philosophy, namely the role he plays in her particular version of teleology. I conclude that, while (...)
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  20.  15
    Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century.(Skaldic Poetry of The. [REVIEW] Speculum 85:377-379.
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  21.  13
    Margaret Cormack (2010). Margaret Clunies Ross, Ed., Poetry on Christian Subjects, 1: The Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; 2: The Fourteenth Century. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. 1: Pp. Lxix, 1–468; 1 Black-and-White Figure. 2: Pp. Iv, 469–1040. €120. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (2):377-379.
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  22. Sarah Hutton (2003). Margaret Cavendish and Henry More. In Stephen Clucas (ed.), A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle. Ashgate
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  23.  12
    Eileen O'Neill (2013). Margaret Cavendish, Stoic Antecedent Causes, and Early Modern Occasional Causes. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 3 (3):311-326.
    Margaret Cavendish was an English natural philosopher. Influenced by Hobbes and by ancient Stoicism, she held that the created, natural world is purely material; there are no incorporeal substances that causally affect the world in the course of nature. However, she parts company with Hobbes and sides with the Stoics in rejecting a participate theory of matter. Instead, she holds that matter is a continuum. She rejects the mechanical philosophy's account of the essence of matter as simply extension. For (...)
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  24.  30
    Scott Woodcock (2009). Five Reasons Why Margaret Somerville is Wrong About Same-Sex Marriage and the Rights of Children. Dialogue 48 (04):867-.
    ABSTRACT: In written work and a lecture at the 2008 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences that was co-sponsored by the Canadian Philosophical Association, Margaret Somerville has claimed that allowing same-sex marriage is unethical because doing so violates the inherently procreative function of marriage and thereby undermines the rights and duties that exist between children and their biological parents. In my paper, I offer five reasons for thinking that Somerville’s argument for this conclusion is unpersuasive. In each case (...)
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  25.  7
    James E. Force (2011). Margaret Jo Osler (1942–2010). Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1).
    Professor Margaret Jo Osler of the University of Calgary, an historian of early modern science and philosophy (and a member of the Board of Directors of the Journal of the History of Philosophy since 2002) died on September 15, 2010. Born on November 27, 1942, she proudly proclaimed herself to be a "red diaper baby" and particularly delighted in telling her right-wing friends how her middle name was her parents' homage to Stalin. An energetic scholar with a vibrant and (...)
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  26.  4
    Margaret Davies, Ngaire Naffine, Anthony J. Connolly, Margaret Thornton, Rosalind F. Atherton & Peter Drahos (2003). Margaret Davies and Ngaire Naffine. Are Persons Property? Legal Debates About Property and Personality [Book Symposium.]. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 28 (2003):189.
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  27.  28
    Jane Duran (2010). Margaret Fuller and Transcendental Feminism. The Pluralist 5 (1):65-72.
    Margaret Fuller's name today often appears when the Transcendentalists in general are mentioned-we may hear of her in the course of writing on Emerson, or Bronson Alcott-but not nearly enough work about Margaret herself, her thought, and her remarkable childhood has been done in recent times.1 Interestingly enough, her name surfaces in connection with some theorizing done about same-sex relationships, but the great import of Fuller's editing of "The Dial," a periodical of the time, her authoring of Woman (...)
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  28.  4
    Sophie Dulucq (1997). Margaret COURTNEY-CLARKE, Ndebele. L'art d'une tribu d'Afrique du Sud, Arthaud, 1991, 204 p. Clio 2:26-26.
    Ce très bel ouvrage de la photographe namibienne Margaret Courtney-Clarke, publié primitivement aux États-Unis en 1986 (Rizzoli), a contribué à faire connaître internationalement les peintures ndebele d'Afrique du Sud, ces larges figures géométriques en aplat sur les murs des concessions, ces compositions savantes aux couleurs lumineuses, aux motifs complexes rythmés de noir et de blanc. La réunion des Musées de France a même édité un jeu de cartes inspiré de ces motifs décoratifs, en ..
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  29.  2
    Charlene Haddock Seigfried (2013). The Role of Place in Jane Addams and Margaret Preston. The Pluralist 8 (3):1-16.
    My exploration of the nature of and importance of place will focus on two women: Jane Addams and Margaret Preston.1 As far as I know, Jane Addams never met Margaret Preston, who was Australia’s foremost woman painter between the two world wars, nor did they influence each other in any way. However, they partially overlap in time: Jane Addams 1860–1935, Margaret Preston 1875–1963. They also share similar approaches to the ties that bind us to the countries in (...)
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  30.  2
    Margaret Dunlop (1996). Arphorn Chuaprapaislip in a Conversation with Margaret Dunlop. Nursing Inquiry 3 (4):245-246.
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  31.  2
    Margaret Dunlop (1997). Paola di Guilio in a Conversation with Margaret Dunlop. Nursing Inquiry 4 (3):203-204.
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  32.  5
    Martin J. Kelly (1999). Margaret Mead in Samoa. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (116):169-174.
    In 1983, Harvard University Press published Derek Freeman's Margaret Mead And Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth. Many anthropologists judged the book to be an unwarranted attack on the late Margaret Mead for the field work she did in 1925-26 for Coming of Age in Samoa, published in 1928. The implications from this now famous book served as evidence for a general liberal view of culture in America, resonated with the work of John Dewey as (...)
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  33.  22
    Margaret J. Osler & Richard A. Watson (2003). Reply by Margaret J. Osler and Richard A. Watson. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):407-407.
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  34.  17
    Darryl Macer (2010). Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, Ed. 2008. Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):259-260.
    Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, ed. 2008. Human genetic biobanks in Asia: Politics of trust and scientific advancement Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9234-6 Authors Darryl Macer, UNESCO Bangkok Regional Adviser in Social and Human Sciences for Asia and the Pacific, Regional Unit for Social and Human Sciences in Asia and the Pacific (RUSHSAP) 920 Sukhumvit Road, Prakanong Bangkok 10110 Thailand Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 7 Journal Issue Volume 7, Number 2.
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  35.  13
    Alistair Mutch (2004). Constraints on the Internal Conversation: Margaret Archer and the Structural Shaping of Thought. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (4):429–445.
    Margaret Archer has recently provided a persuasive account of the importance of the internal conversation to reflexivity. This raises questions about the shaping of such conversations by involuntary agential positioning. The work of Bourdieu and Bernstein is reviewed to suggest that structural influences can operate by condi-tioning the resources available for the conducting of the internal conversation. Particular emphasis is placed on the transfer of taken for granted ideas from one domain of practice to another.
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  36.  13
    Margaret Battin (2009). Margaret Battin Replies. Hastings Center Report 39 (2):8-8.
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  37.  15
    Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's. Hypatia 17 (1).
    : Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  38.  1
    Iep Author, Cavendish, Margaret.
    Margaret Cavendish Margaret Lucas Cavendish, the Duchess of Newcastle, was a philosopher, poet, playwright and essayist. Her philosophical writings were concerned mostly with issues of metaphysics and natural philosophy, but also extended to social and political concerns. Like Hobbes and Descartes, she rejected what she took to be the occult explanations of the Scholastics. … Continue reading Cavendish, Margaret →.
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  39. Margaret P. Battin (2004). Brooke Hopkins Margaret P. Battin. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press 312.
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  40.  0
    Margaret A. Boden (1977). Human Values in a Mechanistic Universe: Margaret A. Boden. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 11:135-171.
    The truth can be dangerous. It is because they realise this that the Roman Catholic Church forbid cremation. Cremation is, of course, theologically permissible, and in times of epidemic the Church allows it. But in normal times it is forbidden — Why? The reason is that the Church fears the influence of the image associated with it. It is difficult enough for the faithful to accept the notion of bodily resurrection after having seen a burial . But the image of (...)
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  41. Margaret Chatterjee, R. Balasubramanian & V. C. Thomas (eds.) (1993). Perspectives in Philosophy, Religion, and Art: Essays in Honour of Margaret Chatterjee. Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
     
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  42.  0
    Margaret Chatterjee (1967). The Presuppositions of Inter-Religious Communication—a Philosophical Approach1: Margaret Chatterjee. Religious Studies 3 (1):391-400.
    Religion has in the past, it may be truefully admitted, done more than its share of fostering the spirit of ‘we’ over against ‘they’. Economic and political factors have unfortunately, throughout history, clogged the channels of communication between men of one faith and those of another. The most unhappy aspect of the relation between religion and society has been the way in which the former has fostered the distinction between the insider and the outsider. Typical of this is the fact (...)
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  43.  0
    Colin Ford (2003). Julia Margaret Cameron: A Critical Biography. J. Paul Getty Museum.
    British photographer Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) has been described as "one of the Finest portraitists of the nineteenth century-in any medium.
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  44.  0
    Margaret Fuller, M. Carey Thomas, Barbara M. Cross & Catherine Beecher (1966). The Educated Woman in America. Selected Writings of Catherine Beecher, Margaret Fuller and M. Carey Thomas. British Journal of Educational Studies 14 (3):103-104.
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  45.  0
    Hugh Magennis (1996). “Listen Now All and Understand”: Adaptation of Hagiographical Material for Vernacular Audiences in the Old English Lives of St. Margaret. Speculum 71 (1):27-42.
    The two extant Old English lives of the virgin-martyr St. Margaret of Antioch, in London, British Library, Cotton Tiberius A. iii, and Cambridge, Corpus Christi College Library 303, reflect the specific interest in this saint that appears to have developed in England in the late Anglo-Saxon period. More broadly, they are representative of the widely evident interest in this period in making hagiographical material available, in prose, to vernacular audiences. Although Ælfric played the leading part in that enterprise, numerous (...)
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  46. Eileen O'Neill (ed.) (2005). Margaret Cavendish: Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Margaret Cavendish's 1668 edition of Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, presented here in a 2001 edition, holds a unique position in early modern philosophy. Cavendish rejects the Aristotelianism which was taught in the universities in the seventeenth century, and the picture of nature as a grand machine which was propounded by Hobbes, Descartes and members of the Royal Society of London, such as Boyle. She also rejects the views of nature which make reference to immaterial spirits. Instead she develops an (...)
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  47. Margaret Jane Radin (1994). Alexander Morgan Capron and Margaret Jane Radin. Contemporary Issues in Bioethics 16:258.
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  48.  83
    Ellen F. Davis (2011). Book Review: Margaret Barker, Creation: The Biblical Vision for the Environment (London; New York: T & T Clark International, 2010). 326 Pp. £16.99 (Pb), ISBN 978-0-567-01547-1. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (1):92-95.
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  49.  86
    Sheila Shaver (2011). Review: Margaret R. Somers, Genealogies of Citizenship: Markets, Statelessness, and the Right to Have Rights (Cambridge University Press, 2008). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 105 (1):130-134.
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  50. Karen Detlefsen (2006). Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3 (199):240.
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