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  1. Margaret Martin (2012). Cane , Peter , Ed. The Hart-Fuller Debate in the Twenty-First Century Oxford, OR: Hart, 2010. Pp. 360. $75.00 (Cloth). Ethics 122 (4):801-806.
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  2. Margaret Martin (2012). International Criminal Law : Between Utopian Dreams and Political Realities. In François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.), Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.
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  3. Margaret Martin (2010). Raz's The Morality of Freedom: Two Models of Authority. Jurisprudence 1 (1):63-84.
    Seventeenth century philosophers were pre-occupied with the justification for the use of coercion; the nature and scope of the citizen's duty to obey the law was a central concern. The typical philosophical accounts which attempt to articulate the conditions under which a citizen has an obligation to obey the law tend to fall into two camps: those that ground the obligation to obey the law in consent, and those that ground it in benefits received, or possibly a combination of both. (...)
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  4. Aubrey J. Yates, Margaret Martin & Vincent Di Lollo (1970). Retrieval Strategy in Dichotic Listening as a Function of Presentation Rate and Structure of Material. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):26.
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