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Margaret A. McLaren [10]Margaret McLaren [1]
  1. Margaret A. McLaren (2009). Amy Allen , The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008) ISBN: 9780231136228. Foucault Studies:83-87.
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  2. Margaret A. McLaren (2006). From Practices of the Self to Politics. Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):195-201.
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  3. Margaret A. Mclaren (2003). Book Review: Bat-Ami Bar On. The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
  4. Margaret A. McLaren (2003). The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding (Review). Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
  5. Margaret A. McLaren (2002). Feminism, Foucault, and Embodied Subjectivity. SUNY Press.
    Addressing central questions in the debate about Foucault's usefulness for politics, including his rejection of universal norms, his conception of power and power-knowledge, his seemingly contradictory position on subjectivity and his ...
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  6. Margaret A. McLaren (2001). Feminist Ethics: Care as a Virtue. In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), Feminists Doing Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc. 101--118.
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  7. Margaret A. McLaren (1999). Two Feminist Views on the Self, Identity and Collective Action. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (1):120 - 125.
  8. Margaret A. McLaren (1997). Foucaultand the Subject of Feminism. Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):109-128.
  9. Margaret A. McLaren (1994). Book Review:Situating the Self: Gender, Community and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics. Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (2):410-.
  10. Margaret McLaren (1993). Possibilities for a Nondominated Female Subjectivity. Hypatia 8 (1):153 - 158.
    This essay examines one of the contributions that Sandra Bartky makes to feminist theory. Bartky critiques Foucault for his gender blind treatment of the disciplines and social practices that create "docile bodies." She introduces several gender specific disciplines and practices that illustrate that the production of bodies is itself gender coded. This essay argues that social practices are not monolithic, but are composed of various strands that may be in tension with one another.
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