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Profile: Margret Grebowicz (Goucher College)
  1.  35
    Margret Grebowicz (2005). Consensus, Dissensus, and Democracy: What Is at Stake in Feminist Science Studies? Philosophy of Science 72 (5):989-1000.
    If feminists argue for the irreducibility of the social dimensions of science, then they ought to embrace the idea that feminist and non-feminist scientists are not in collaboration, but in fact defend different interests. Instead, however, contemporary feminist science studies literature argues that feminist research improves particular, existing scientific enterprises, both epistemically (truer claims) and politically (more democratic methodologies and applications). I argue that the concepts of empirical success and democracy at work in this literature from Longino (1994) and Harding (...)
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  2.  44
    Margret Grebowicz (2011). Democracy and Pornography: On Speech, Rights, Privacies, and Pleasures in Conflict. Hypatia 26 (1):150 - 165.
    This article investigates the intersections of secrecy/interiority, the state, and speech/ expression, and their implications for the rights of women. I propose a critique of commercial pornography that reanimates MacKinnon's claim that pornography and American democracy are in a relationship of mutual reinforcement, and incorporates poststructuralist (Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Butler) commitments to secrecy and unintelligibility, as well as their role in the production of pleasure.
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  3.  21
    Margret Grebowicz (2005). Feyerabend's Postmodernism. Studies in Practical Philosophy 5 (1):112-133.
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  4.  30
    Margret Grebowicz (2007). Standpoint Theory and the Possibility of Justice: A Lyotardian Critique of the Democratization of Knowledge. Hypatia 22 (4):16-29.
    : Grebowicz argues from the perspective of Jean-François Lyotard's critique of deliberative democracy that the project of democratizing knowledge may bring us closer to terror than to justice. The successful formulation of a critical standpoint requires that we figure the political as itself a contested site, and incorporate this into our theorizing about the role of dissent in the production of knowledges. This essay contrasts Lyotard's notion of the differend with Chantal Mouffe's agonistic model.
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  5.  5
    Margret Grebowicz (2006). Relocating the Non-Place. International Studies in Philosophy 38 (2):39-53.
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  6.  7
    Margret Grebowicz (2006). Scholar's Symposium: The Work of David Carr. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (4):443-444.
  7.  7
    Margret Grebowicz (2002). Outer Space. Philosophy Today 46 (5):120-127.
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  8.  4
    Margret Grebowicz (2006). “Where Have the Philosophers Been All This Time?”: Reading Maxwell's Revolution. [REVIEW] Metascience 15 (1):141-144.
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  9. Margret Grebowicz (2005). 'Between Betrayal and Betrayal': Epistemology and Ethics in Derrida's Debt to Levinas. In Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust & Kent Still (eds.), Addressing Levinas. Northwestern University Press 75--85.
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  10.  4
    Margret Grebowicz, Helen Merrick & Donna Haraway (2013). Beyond the Cyborg: Adventures with Donna Haraway. Columbia University Press.
    This long-overdue volume explores her influence on feminist theory and philosophy, paying particular attention to her more recent work on companion species, rather than her "Manifesto for Cyborgs.
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  11. Margret Grebowicz (ed.) (2007). Gender After Lyotard. State University of New York Press.
    Examines Lyotard’s writings in light of contemporary feminist theory.
     
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  12. Margret Grebowicz (2005). “Marie Goes To Japan”: Thinking, Praxis, and the Possibility of the New. Janus Head 8 (2).
    Why “do” philosophy, if not to contribute to social consciousness , to develop ideas for change, to articulate the desperations of the present and the possibilities of futures which will help people, however loosely we define “people”? This is one of the most popular objections to philosophy: that it is not practical, and therefore not really politically useful. And in today’s philosophical arena, this argument is directed specifically against postmodern philosophies. However, there is another sense of the word “postmodern,” which (...)
     
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  13. Margret Grebowicz (2002). Reading Well: Notes onThe Prayers and Tears of Jacques Derrida. [REVIEW] Sophia 41 (1):73-82.
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  14. Margret Grebowicz (2007). Standpoint Theory and the Possibility of Justice: A Lyotardian Critique of the Democratization of Knowledge. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (4):16-29.
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  15. Margret Grebowicz (2007). Standpoint Theory and the Possibility of Justice: A Lyotardian Critique of the Democratization of Knowledge. Hypatia 22 (4):16-29.
  16. Margret Grebowicz (2010). Splitting the Origin : Writing and Responsibility. In Martin McQuillan & Ika Willis (eds.), The Origins of Deconstruction. Palgrave Macmillan
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  17. Margret Grebowicz (2014). The National Park to Come. Stanford Briefs.
    _The National Park to Come_ examines the sense of "the national" that our national parks construct and the kind of citizen they produce in the process. Who is the visitor in these spaces? Who is the national and who the foreigner? To whose children is the ostensibly unpeopled wilderness of the future owed? At what cost, and to whom? Grebowicz explores how such politicized modes of being-in-nature are maintained on the emotional level, shaping our basic sense of coherence, futurity, collectivity, (...)
     
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  18. Margret Grebowicz (2014). The National Park to Come. Stanford Briefs.
    _The National Park to Come_ examines the sense of "the national" that our national parks construct and the kind of citizen they produce in the process. Who is the visitor in these spaces? Who is the national and who the foreigner? To whose children is the ostensibly unpeopled wilderness of the future owed? At what cost, and to whom? Grebowicz explores how such politicized modes of being-in-nature are maintained on the emotional level, shaping our basic sense of coherence, futurity, collectivity, (...)
     
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  19. Margret Grebowicz (2014). The the National Park to Come. Stanford Briefs.
    _The National Park to Come_ examines the sense of "the national" that our national parks construct and the kind of citizen they produce in the process. Who is the visitor in these spaces? Who is the national and who the foreigner? To whose children is the ostensibly unpeopled wilderness of the future owed? At what cost, and to whom? Grebowicz explores how such politicized modes of being-in-nature are maintained on the emotional level, shaping our basic sense of coherence, futurity, collectivity, (...)
     
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  20. Margret Grebowicz (2013). Why Internet Porn Matters. Stanford University Press.
    Now that pornography is on the Internet, its political and social functions have changed. So contends Margret Grebowicz in this imperative philosophical analysis of Internet porn. The production and consumption of Internet porn, in her account, are a symptom of the obsession with self-exposure in today's social networking media, which is, in turn, a symptom of the modern democratic construction of the governable subject as both transparent and communicative. In this first feminist critique to privilege the effects of pornography's Internet (...)
     
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