1. Sarah Wu, Hitha Amin, Maria Barth, Vanessa Malcarne & Vinod Menon (2012). Math Anxiety in Second and Third Graders and Its Relation to Mathematics Achievement. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Although the detrimental effects of math anxiety in adults are well understood, few studies have examined how it affects younger children who are beginning to learn math in a formal academic setting. Here, we examine the relationship between math anxiety and math achievement in 2nd and 3rd graders. In response to the need for a grade-appropriate measure of assessing math anxiety in this group we first describe the development of Scale for Early Mathematics Anxiety (SEMA), a new measure for assessing (...)
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  2. Frances S. Chen, Maria Barth, Stephen L. Johnson, Ian H. Gotlib & Susan C. Johnson (2011). Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) Polymorphisms and Attachment in Human Infants. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
    Ordinary variations in human infants’ attachment behaviors—their proclivity to seek and accept comfort from caregivers—are associated with a wide range of individual differences in psychological functioning in adults. The current investigation examined variation in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene as one possible source of these variations in infant attachment. One hundred and seventy-six infants (77 Caucasian, 99 non-Caucasian) were classified as securely or insecurely attached based on their behavior in the Strange Situation (Ainsworth et al., 1976). The A allele at (...)
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  3. Susan C. Johnson, Carol S. Dweck, Frances S. Chen, Hilarie L. Stern, Su-Jeong Ok & Maria Barth (2010). At the Intersection of Social and Cognitive Development: Internal Working Models of Attachment in Infancy. Cognitive Science 34 (5):807-825.
    Three visual habituation studies using abstract animations tested the claim that infants’ attachment behavior in the Strange Situation procedure corresponds to their expectations about caregiver–infant interactions. Three unique patterns of expectations were revealed. Securely attached infants expected infants to seek comfort from caregivers and expected caregivers to provide comfort. Insecure-resistant infants not only expected infants to seek comfort from caregivers but also expected caregivers to withhold comfort. Insecure-avoidant infants expected infants to avoid seeking comfort from caregivers and expected caregivers to (...)
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