Search results for 'Maria C. Lugones' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Maria C. Lugones (1990). Structure/Antistructure and Agency Under Oppression. Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):500-507.score: 290.0
  2. Maria Lugones (2007). Heterosexualism and the Colonial / Modern Gender System. Hypatia 22 (1):186-209.score: 150.0
    : The coloniality of power is understood by Anibal Quijano as at the constituting crux of the global capitalist system of power. What is characteristic of global, Eurocentered, capitalist power is that it is organized around two axes that Quijano terms "the coloniality of power" and "modernity." The coloniality of power introduces the basic and universal social classification of the population of the planet in terms of the idea of race, a replacing of relations of superiority and inferiority established through (...)
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  3. Marìa Lugones (2010). Toward a Decolonial Feminism. Hypatia 25 (4):742-759.score: 150.0
    In “Heterosexualism and the Colonial/Modern Gender System” (Lugones 2007), I proposed to read the relation between the colonizer and the colonized in terms of gender, race, and sexuality. By this I did not mean to add a gendered reading and a racial reading to the already understood colonial relations. Rather I proposed a rereading of modern capitalist colonial modernity itself. This is because the colonial imposition of gender cuts across questions of ecology, economics, government, relations with the spirit world, (...)
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  4. María Lugones (2000). Multiculturalism and Publicity. Hypatia 15 (3):175-181.score: 150.0
    : This review considers the process of expansion of subjectivity that María Pía Lara introduces in Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere. As the complexity of Lara's understanding of multiculturalism is exhibited, the process of achievement of self-realization and autonomy is critiqued as inconsistent with the hidden transcript/public transcript distinction. The "we" to be fashioned intersubjectively in the dialogical process of subjective expansion cannot countenance that crucial distinction to the understanding of those narratives.
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  5. María Lugones (1987). Playfulness, "World"-Travelling, and Loving Perception. Hypatia 2 (2):3 - 19.score: 120.0
    A paper about cross-cultural and cross-racial loving that emphasizes the need to understand and affirm the plurality in and among women as central to feminist ontology and epistemology. Love is seen not as fusion and erasure of difference but as incompatible with them. Love reveals plurality. Unity-not to be confused with solidarity-is understood as conceptually tied to domination.
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  6. Maria Lugones (2006). On Complex Communication. Hypatia 21 (3):75-85.score: 120.0
    : This essay examines liminality as space of which dominant groups largely are ignorant. The limen is at the edge of hardened structures, a place where transgression of the reigning order is possible. As such, it both offers communicative openings and presents communicative impasses to liminal beings. For the limen to be a coalitional space, complex communication is required. This requires praxical awareness of one's own multiplicity and a recognition of the other's opacity that does not attempt to assimilate it (...)
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  7. María Lugones (1992). On Borderlands/La Frontera: An Interpretive Essay. Hypatia 7 (4):31 - 37.score: 120.0
    Borderlands/La Frontera deals with the psychology of resistance to oppression. The possibility of resistance is revealed by perceiving the self in the process of being oppressed as another face of the self in the process of resisting oppression. The new mestiza consciousness is born from this interplay between oppression and resistance. Resistance is understood as social, collective activity, by adding to Anzaldúa's theory the distinction between the act and the process of resistance.
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  8. María Lugones (1990). Review: Hispaneando y Lesbiando: On Sarah Hoagland's "Lesbian Ethics". [REVIEW] Hypatia 5 (3):138 - 146.score: 120.0
    This review looks at Sarah Hoagland's Lesbian Ethics from the position of a lesbian who is also a cultural participant in a colonized heterosexualist culture (la cultura Nuevomejicana) within the powerful context of its colonizing heterosexualist culture (Angloamerican culture). From this position separation from heterosexualism acquires great complexity since the position described is that of a plural self. In Lesbian Ethics lesbian community is the community of separation where demoralization is avoided by auto-koenonous selves. Because heterosexualism is not a cross-cultural (...)
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  9. María Lugones (2009). Cosmology and Gender in Sylvia Marcos's Taken From the Lips. Clr James Journal 15 (1):283-288.score: 120.0
  10. María Lugones (2014). Musing: Reading the Nondiasporic From Within Diasporas. Hypatia 29 (1):18-22.score: 120.0
  11. María Lugones (2005). Multiculturalismo Radical y Feminismos de Mujeres de Color. Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 25:61-76.score: 120.0
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  12. Maria Lugones (2002). Impure Communities. In Philip Alperson (ed.), Diversity and Community: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Blackwell Pub.. 58--64.score: 120.0
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  13. Maria Lugones (1998). Motion, Stasis, and Resistance to Interlocked Oppressions. In Susan Hardy Aiken (ed.), Making Worlds: Gender, Metaphor, Materiality. University of Arizona Press. 49--53.score: 120.0
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  14. María Lugones (2003). Pilgrimages/Peregrinajes: Theorizing Oppression Against Mulptiple Oppressions. Lantham.score: 120.0
  15. María Lugones (forthcoming). Radical Multiculturalism and Women of Color Feminisms. Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política.score: 120.0
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  16. Maria Lugones & Pat Alaka Rosezelle (1995). Sisterhood and Friendship as Feminist Models. In Penny A. Weiss & Marilyn Friedman (eds.), Feminism and Community. Temple University Press.score: 120.0
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  17. Alison Bailey (2007). Strategic Ignorance. In Shannon Sullivan & Nancy Tuana (eds.), Race and Epistemologies of Ignorance. State Univ of New York Pr. 77--94.score: 36.0
    I want to explore strategic expressions of ignorance against the background of Charles W. Mills's account of epistemologies of ignorance in The Racial Contract (1997). My project has two interrelated goals. I want to show how Mills's discussion is restricted by his decision to frame ignorance within the language and logic of social contract theory. And, I want to explain why Maria Lugones's work on purity is useful in reframing ignorance in ways that both expand our understandings of (...)
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  18. Jen Mcweeny (2010). Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of María Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin. Hypatia 25 (2):295 - 315.score: 36.0
    This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply epistemohgical.
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  19. Paula M. L. Moya (2006). Book review: Maria Lugones. Pilgramages/peregrinajes: Theorizing coalition against multiple oppressions. Lanham, md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (3):198-202.score: 36.0
  20. Gaile Pohlhaus (2011). Wrongful Requests and Strategic Refusals to Understand. In Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.score: 36.0
    In The Alchemy of Race and Rights Patricia Williams notes that when people of color are asked to understand such practices as racial profiling by putting themselves in the shoes of white people, they are, in effect, being asked to, ‘look into the mirror of frightened white faces for the reality of their undesirability’ (1992, 46). While we often see understanding another as ethically and epistemically virtuous, in this paper I argue that it is wrong in some cases to ask (...)
     
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  21. Alison Bailey (1998). Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a View of Privilege-Cognizant White Character. Hypatia 13 (3):27 - 42.score: 24.0
    I address the problem of how to locate "traitorous" subjects, or those who belong to dominant groups yet resist the usual assumptions and practices of those groups. I argue that Sandra Harding's description of traitors as insiders, who "become marginal" is misleading. Crafting a distinction between "privilege-cognizant" and "privilege-evasive" white scripts, I offer an alternative account of race traitors as privilege-cognizant whites who refuse to animate expected whitely scripts, and who are unfaithful to worldviews whites are expected to hold.
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  22. Alison Bailey (2001). Taking Responsibility for Community Violence. In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), FEMINISTS DOING ETHICS.score: 24.0
    This article examines the responses of two communities to hate crimes in their cities. In particular it explores how community understandings of responsibility shape collective responses to hate crimes. I use the case of Bridesberg, Pennsylvania to explore how anti-racist work is restricted by backward-looking conceptions of moral responsibility (e.g. being responsible). Using recent writings in feminist ethics.(1) I argue for a forward-looking notion that advocates an active view: taking responsibility for attitudes and behaviors that foster climates in which hate (...)
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  23. Gaile Pohlhaus (2001). Diversity and Communication in Feminist Theory. Social Philosophy Today 17:153-162.score: 18.0
    When diversity figures in ways that insulate women's differences from one another rather than theorizing about them together, it is difficult to see how interactionamong women that recognizes their differences is possible. In turn, the possibility of communication may seem inordinately difficult when taking place among diverse groups about their differences. While not denying these difficulties, I want to avoid approaches and practices that may draw us into a stalemate in considering possibilities for communication. In the following, I bring together (...)
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  24. María Pía Lara (2000). A Reply to My Critics. Hypatia 15 (3):182-186.score: 15.0
    : My text is written to answer the questions asked at the APA Meeting's presentation of the book Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere by professors María Lugones and Eduardo Mendieta. The answer seeks to clarify that Lugones's infrapolitics position is not so distant from mine. I also address Mendieta's question directed more to the aesthetic domain. There, I seek to show how my position could be taken as a creative effort to extend some of Habermas's (...)
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  25. Mariana Ortega (2006). Being Lovingly, Knowingly Ignorant: White Feminism and Women of Color. Hypatia 21 (3):56-74.score: 12.0
    : The aim of this essay is to analyze the notion of "loving, knowing ignorance," a type of "arrogant perception" that produces ignorance about women of color and their work at the same time that it proclaims to have both knowledge about and loving perception toward them. The first part discusses Marilyn Frye's accounts of "arrogant" as well as of "loving" perception and presents an explanation of "loving, knowing ignorance." The second part discusses the work of Audre Lorde, Elizabeth Spelman, (...)
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  26. Ann Garry (2011). Intersectionality, Metaphors, and the Multiplicity of Gender. Hypatia 26 (4):826-850.score: 12.0
    Although intersectional analyses of gender have been widely adopted by feminist theorists in many disciplines, controversy remains over their character, limitations, and implications. I support intersectionality, cautioning against asking too much of it. It provides standards for the uses of methods or frameworks rather than theories of power, oppression, agency, or identity. I want feminist philosophers to incorporate intersectional analyses more fully into our work so that our theories can, in fact, have the pluralistic and inclusive character to which we (...)
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  27. Alison Bailey (1998). Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a Theory of White Character Formation. Hypatia 13 (3).score: 12.0
    This essay explores how the social location of white traitorous identities might be understood. I begin by examining some of the problematic implications of Sandra Harding's standpoint framework description of race traitors as 'becoming marginal.' I argue that the location of white traitors might be better understood in terms of their 'decentering the center.' I distinguish between 'privilege-cognizant' and 'privilege-evasive' white scripts. Drawing on the work of Marilyn Frye and Anne Braden, I offer an account of the contrasting perceptions and (...)
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  28. Mariana Ortega (2001). "New Mestizas," "'World'-Travelers," and "Dasein": Phenomenology and the Multi-Voiced, Multi-Cultural Self. Hypatia 16 (3):1 - 29.score: 12.0
    The aim of this essay is to carry out an analysis of the multi-voiced, multi-cultural self discussed by Latina feminists in light of a Heideggerian phenomenological account of persons or "Existential Analytic." In so doing, it (a) points out similarities as well as differences between the Heideggerian description of the self and Latina feminists' phenomenological accounts of self, and (b) critically assesses María Lugones's important notion of "world-traveling." In the end, the essay defends the view of a "multiplicitous" self (...)
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  29. Mariana Ortega (2001). New Mestizas," "'World'-Travelers," And. Hypatia 16 (3).score: 12.0
    : The aim of this essay is to carry out an analysis of the multi-voiced, multi-cultural self discussed by Latina feminists in light of a Heideggerian phenomenological account of persons or "Existential Analytic." In so doing, it (a) points out similarities as well as differences between the Heideggerian description of the self and Latina feminists' phenomenological accounts of self, and (b) critically assesses María Lugones's important notion of "world-traveling." In the end, the essay defends the view of a "multiplicitous" (...)
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  30. Charles W. Wright (2004). Particularity and Perspective Taking: On Feminism and Habermas's Discourse Theory of Morality. Hypatia 19 (4):47-74.score: 12.0
    : Seyla Benhabib's critique of Jürgen Habermas's moral theory claims that his approach is not adequate for the needs of a feminist moral theory. I argue that her analysis is mistaken. I also show that Habermas's moral theory, properly understood, satisfies many of the conditions identified by feminist moral philosophers as necessary for an adequate moral theory. A discussion of the compatibility between the model of reciprocal perspective taking found in Habermas's moral theory and that found in María Lugones's (...)
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  31. Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.) (1998). Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge.score: 12.0
    The essays in Daring to Be Good challenge the private/public split that assumes ethics is a private, individual concern and politics is a public, group concern. This collection addresses philosophical issues and controversies of interest to feminists, including prostitution, the ethics of the Human Genome research project as it impacts Native Americans, and reproductive technology. Contributors include:Bat-Ami Bar On, Sandra Lee Bartky, Chris Cuomo, Ann Ferguson, Jane Flax, Lori Gruen and Maria Lugones.
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  32. Fred Evans (1998). Voices, Oracles, and the Politics of Multiculturalism. Symposium 2 (2):179-189.score: 12.0
    Maria Lugones and other writers of post-colonial discourse emphasize hybrid over univocal identities. I argue that a significantly expanded version of Mikhail Bakhtin’s notion of “dialogized heteroglossia” reveals that the linguistic community and the “voives” at play in the latter constitute a form of dialogic hybridity. This view of the linguistic community offers an alternative to the notion of pure identities and the politics of exclusion that it has supported either overtly or tacitly. Moreover, a political principle - (...)
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  33. Mechthild Hart (2013). Laboring and Hanging Out in the Embodied In-Between. Hypatia 28 (1):49-68.score: 12.0
    In this essay I describe how my involvement in the political struggles of an immigrant domestic workers' collective inspired me to hang out not only with the workers, but also with the writings of María Lugones and Hannah Arendt. The essay invites the reader to engage in a playful rereading of Arendt's notion of the worldlessness of laboring in the private realm by putting her into dialogue with Lugones's notion of the hangout that defies the public–private split Arendt (...)
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  34. Saba Fatima (2011). Who Counts as a Muslim? Identity, Multiplicity and Politics. Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 31 (3):339-353.score: 12.0
    My aim in this paper is to carve out a political understanding of the Muslim identity. The Muslim identity is shaped within a religious mold. Inseparable from this religious understanding is a political one that is valuable in its own right in order to secure any sustainable possibility of participating politically as Muslims within a democratic liberal democracy, such as the United States. Here I explore not the historical or theological formation of the Muslim identity, rather a metaphysical understanding of (...)
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  35. Shireen Roshanravan (2014). Motivating Coalition: Women of Color and Epistemic Disobedience. Hypatia 29 (1):41-58.score: 12.0
    This essay engages Chandra Mohanty, M. Jacqui Alexander, and María Lugones in a “plurilogue” to elaborate and exhibit a method that animates the differential mode of Women of Color politics while rendering more acute the strategies each scholar offers against the racialized, gendered oppressions of colonialism and global capitalism. Ella Shohat describes “a multifaceted plurilogue” as a “dissonant polyphony” that “links different yet co-implicated constituencies and arenas of struggle” (Shohat 2001, 2). The emphasis on reading differences within Women of (...)
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  36. Christine Cuomo (1998). Feminism and Ecological Communities. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Feminism and Ecological Communities presents a bold and passionate rethinking of teh ecofeminist movement. It is one of the first books to acknowledge the importance of postmodern feminist arguments against ecofeminism whilst persuasively preseenting a strong new case for econolocal feminism. Chris J.Cuomo first traces the emergence of ecofeminism from the ecological and feminist movements before clearly discussing the weaknesses of some ecofeminist positions. Exploring the dualisms of nature/culture and masculing/feminine that are the bulwark of many contemporary ecofeminist positions and (...)
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  37. Jennifer McWeeny (2014). Topographies of Flesh: Women, Nonhuman Animals, and the Embodiment of Connection and Difference. Hypatia 29 (2):269-286.score: 12.0
    Because of risks of essentialism and homogenization, feminist theorists frequently avoid making precise ontological claims, especially in regard to specifying bodily connections and differences among women. However well-intentioned, this trend may actually run counter to the spirit of intersectionality by shifting feminists' attention away from embodiment, fostering oppressor-centric theories, and obscuring privilege within feminism. What feminism needs is not to turn from ontological specificity altogether, but to engage a new kind of ontological project that can account for the material complexity (...)
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