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  1. Maria Rentetzi (2011). Packaging Radium, Selling Science: Boxes, Bottles and Other Mundane Things in the World of Science. Annals of Science 68 (3):375-399.
    Summary This article discusses the intersection of science and culture in the marketplace and explores the ways in which radium quack and medicinal products were packaged and labelled in the early twentieth century US. Although there is an interesting growing body of literature by art historians on package design, historians of science and medicine have paid little to no attention to the ways scientific and medical objects that were turned into commodities were packaged and commercialized. Thinking about packages not as (...)
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  2. Maria Rentetzi (2010). 'I Want to Look Like a Lady, Not Like a Factory Worker'Rose Rand, a Woman Philosopher of the Vienna Circle. In. In M. Dorato M. Suàrez (ed.), Epsa Epistemology and Methodology of Science. Springer. 233--244.
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  3. Maria Rentetzi (2008). The U.S. Radium Industry: Industrial In-House Research and the Commercialization of Science. [REVIEW] Minerva 46 (4):437-462.
    A fierce debate ensued after the announcement in 1913 in the U.S.A. that all rights and ownership of radium-bearing ores found on public land would be reserved by the government. At stake was the State monopolization of radium that pitted powerful industrialists with radium claims, mainly in the Colorado area, against the Bureau of Mines and prestigious physicians who wished to reserve radium for medical uses. This article describes the strategies of one of the biggest U.S. radium industries that dominated (...)
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  4. Maria Rentetzi (2005). The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):377 - 391.
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in the (...)
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  5. Maria Rentetzi (2004). The Women Radium Dial Painters as Experimental Subjects (1920–1990) or What Counts as Human Experimentation. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 12 (4):233-248.
    The case of women radium dial painters — women who tipped their brushes while painting the dials of watches and instruments with radioactive paint — has been extensively discussed in the medical and historical literature. Their painful and abhorrent deaths have occupied the interest of physicians, lawyers, politicians, military agencies, and the public. Hardly any discussion has concerned, however, the use of those women as experimental subjects in a number of epidemiological studies that took place from 1920 to 1990. This (...)
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